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6

It is likely that the establishment first offering pizza in NYC is now lost in the mists of time. Having said that, you can check out Lombardi's Pizza, 22 Spring Street (at the corner of Spring and Mott; also a one-time boundary of New York's Little Italy). Lombardi's has been operating on the same location since 1905, and for a pizza house, that's truly ...


2

I think the most standard scenario is visibly leaving the money (or a credit card) in the book/cup/whatever. Make sure banknotes cannot fly away and wait. The waiter will expect you to do that and try to check again shortly. Just laying the cash and leaving is not the end of the world but it's clearly not the usual way, at least in France. If they are too ...


5

Just FWIW I'd say for (1) yes it's perfectly OK to put the money in the folder, and just get up and leave. you're the heavily paying customer, you've paid and you're done. at a cafe that would be normal. maybe the staff will wave bye-bye to you. at a nice restaurant, the staff SHOULD come and fuss over you as you leave! for (2) inside the book, just so ...


4

I don't think there is a single correct way to do this. Leaving cultural difference aside, and drawing from personal experience (as a guest, not as a waiter), I would say you can either of the things you mentioned, the waiters will act accordingly. If you have exactly the amount you want/have to pay (including cash), you can either put the money on the ...


1

Your main question has been answered by others, but regarding the prepaid card idea; most hotels will put a hold on your card (prepaid or not) for a certain amount (e.g. $40). That in essence, 'holds' the money for them, should they need to use it for incidentals. Therefore, you can't simply use a prepaid card that has $1 on it, because when they try to put ...


14

One thing to consider is that, despite what common sense or simplistic views of economic theory might suggest, many businesses actually rely to a large extent on the customers' honesty. For example, I have worked at a café in an area with many tourists (i.e. people we don't know and who have no reason to fear having a bad reputation or being denied service ...


33

There are a few things you have to consider. I worked before at a hotel refilling those minibars. So I know a bit of how it works. Some hotels have an electronic system. This system registers if something has been taken from the minibar. Please note them some people replace a can of coke (or take it out and after putting it back) and the system will see ...


8

I travel quite a bit and there are a number of different ways that the minibar set up might work. In more upmarket hotels the mini bar is often automated. With small pressure sensors that activate it the item is removed. It tells the hotel billing computer to add the charge to your final bill. In a hotel where i stayed recently the minibar was empty, with ...


0

I think the name is Zedazeni I also tried the drink myself it was very tasty


7

Silly rabbit, Trix are for Americans! Or maybe not. Butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) appears in Health Canada's "Food additives permitted for use" list, with a specific permission for "Dried breakfast cereals". So unless they're wildly exceeding the limits, it seems unlikely that Trix would be banned for this, even though that chemical name sounds ...


1

My mom brings cheese back from France frequently. She declares it and tells them what it is if they ask. Vacuum sealing hasn't come up in the past. I don't think cheese from Holland will be handled any differently than cheese from France. The customs people are mainly concerned about non-aged unpasteurized whole milk cheese (eg. Camembert). Her cheese ...


0

If you take it along with you declare it as dairy, that way worst case scenario they will just take it away from you. If you don't declare it they might charge you a $800 US fine for bringing a dairy product into the country and not declaring it.


7

Your source is confirmed by the US embassy in the Netherlands : "Voedsel dat men kan meenemen naar de V.S : ... Kaas (alleen vacuum verpakt en gepasteuriseerd; geen kazen gemaakt van rauwe melk). De meeste Nederlandse kazen zoals Goudse, Edammer en Leerdammer zijn toegestaan.". Translation: "Foods that one can take to the US: ... Cheese (only vacuum ...


4

There is a whole bunch of news articles w.r.t the cheese issue: Food Safety News The Complete Patient NY Times and the list goes on. At issue is the cheese made from Raw/Unpasteurized Milk which is currently considered to pose a potential health risk based on the FDA/Health Canada Report and another one so the concern is that if the cheese is made from ...


4

There's no hard evidence in this thread on ThaiVisa.com, but it's clear something happened in 2008 (during which time Coke Light was nearly unavailable) that led to this differential. Speculation includes an attempt to drive purchases of Coke Zero, a production shortage, or simply a desire to raise prices.


3

Many soft drinks come in both glass bottles and in cans. The bottled version is less expensive, because the bottles are returnable. The cans not returnable, so you pay more since the container is not reusable. When you get into specialty versions, such as Coke Light, Coke Zero, etc, they tend to only come in cans, so they can be labeled as such. The ...


3

Because people are willing to pay more, price is set at the highest level that does not depress demand too much. It may be that locals will drink the cheaper coke, but travellers are willing to pay more for the Diet, so allowing the market to be segmented.


11

Two possibilities spring to mind. Coca Cola is produced by local partners, http://www.coca-colacompany.com/our-company/bottler-web-sites it is possible that the local partner in Indonesia does not have the space on its production line to make diet coke, which means that it would have to be imported, hence the higher price. The second thought that I had ...


2

Dry ice (CO2) is a better alternative to regular ice. Doesn't leak, much colder, lighter... Freezing is not all that effective if the item has a low water content, like some cheeses. Check with the airline, but in general dry ice is considered a "mildly hazardous" item - pack it properly in a vented container, no more than X kilograms and it's good to go. ...


5

Ha. Before I moved here, I remember my very first time visiting Melbourne, and asking my friends to take me out to an authentically Australian dinner. They said there's no such thing, and we ended up eating Spanish tapas. And over the years, I've come to understand why. Basically, Australian cuisine can be divided into two categories: What people think ...


7

I would suggest a method as simple as any. Freeze it before you leave, put it in your check-in luggage and as soon as you reach the other side, put it in the freezer. I have done this many times with products which require refrigeration (can be milk based as well) and everything remains okay after the flight. If you wish to be extra careful or if the ...


1

Yes, there are. Hachijo islands and Ogasawara islands are famous for spicy food. Islanders put their chilli peppers literally anywhere and they are REALLY hot. I am not sure, but could be a variation of Thai Birds' Eye Chili peppers. Islanders make spicy vinegar-based sauces similar to Tabasco sauce (just few times hotter), use peppers instead of wasabi to ...


0

If you don't pick up your bag, it will be left on or by the belt for a little while, then taken to the baggage desk as an unclaimed bag. Eventually they will send it off to their storage area, but as long as you get there to claim it within an hour or so of landing it likely will still be at the desk.


1

Unclaimed bags typically are collected and go to a special handling area where they're stored for a while before being seized and eventually either destroyed or auctioned off. That's not specific to ORD, it's common practice all over. But why do things like that in the first place? Why not get your luggage and then go get something to eat? There are no ...


3

At Keflavík, there are scheduled arrivals and departures as late as 2AM. The tax free shop is open 24h, but it is difficult to find the opening hours for the other shops, cafés and restaurants. At least Kaffitár, a coffee shop, is open until 1AM and serves snacks and light meals.



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