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2

Many hotels or B&Bs will serve breakfasts (mostly with a choice of either a traditional Irish fried breakfast, or cereal/pastries). Probably just as good as going elsewhere. Sometimes hotel breakfasts can be expensive for what you get, but unless you know a local cafe selling breakfast, a hotel breakfast is probably your best bet.


2

For dinner (in the evening) from 6 to 9ish is when people would start. Lunch is around 12 noon to 2pm, with 1pm being the most popular. Some restaurants may have "early bird" offers, where you can eat cheaper if you start (and hence finish) earlier (i.e. start before/at 5:30pm). A restaurant might be open until midnight, but may not be serving food all ...


6

Konoko (more commonly kuchiko) and konowata are both examples of chinmi, strong-tasting delicacies intended to be eaten in small quantities as an accompaniment to liquor. There thus aren't any restaurants that specialize in them, they're more the kind of thing you will (or will not) find on a rotating menu of today's specials. But here is one random ...


1

Wong Kei on Wardour Street (in China Town) used to have tables up stairs for bigger groups, and singles and pairs were sent downstairs to sit on these long bench-like tables. This is sort of catering for eating alone, as everyone else downstairs is as well. I haven't been since they refurbished though, so it may have changed (can anyone confirm or deny?) ...


6

I often end up eating alone, and you won't stand out. You particularly won't stand out if you are in a hotel aimed at business men/women, but the food / atmosphere may be boring, and you want to avoid that. I know of no restaurants in London that cater explicitly for single diners (and it would seem a very odd concept). You just get a table for two. Bring a ...


13

Eating Alone Rocks! I will not deny that there might be a social stigma associated with eating alone in some cultures/countries. Comments like "what a loser" immediately come to mind. Truth be told, people will always watch/stare/comment/judge since curiosity is an intrinsic part of human nature. The bottom line is that you should not care. There is ...


5

What you want is a casual dining place. Any formal restaurant tends to have all groups and couples, so you'd stand out. If you like Mideastern food, try Edgware Road. There are many Mid-eastern cafés. One of my favourites is Beirut Cafe. (Nearest Tube: Marble Arch) If you like Vietnamese food, try Kingsland Road. There are half a dozen Vietnamese ...


7

Borough Market, near Southwark Cathedral, very often has a lot of stalls selling good food during the day with a few benches to sit on, but maybe not so much at night. I spend a lot of time in London on my own and there are a lot of "apartment" style hotels, where you get (essentially) a studio flat. There will be a kitchenette, plates and cutlery and it ...


33

London has a constant flow of business travellers who are on their own and likely to be seen dining single. Also, there are several neighbourhoods that cater to the singles crowd. As a consequence, there is no stigma attached to eating alone like there might be in other cosmopolitan cities. But more to the point, London restaurants will happily ...


42

I can reassure you that eating anywhere in London is not perceived as out of the ordinary. Any place you want to have lunch/dinner of just a coffee they will serve you with out any hesitation. London is a very busy city, individuals eating alone is common especially in the city centre where most businesses are placed.


2

Generally speaking laws are based on jurisdictions, not the person. Just because something is legal/illegal in your country, doesn't make it illegal/legal in a country you're visiting. Cops enforce their laws not yours. Plus, it would be a nightmare for bouncers to evaluate legality of the person based on their home country (this person is from Ontario, so ...


1

Can a visitor who is “of age” In the United States you are "of age" at 18, you just cant drink/buy until you are 21. Sadly there is no way around it, I am from mexico and in mexico drinking age is 18, once you cross the border you will get fined if you drink alcohol and are younger than 21. It also works both ways, people in the United States can ...


5

Tim Urban's wonderfully thorough piece Everything You Don't Know About Tipping explains what tipping in the US is about. Unless a server was actively hostile, rude and offensive to you, it's not right to deprive them of their income. That's just how it works in the US. Furthermore, as is mentioned, if they get good tips, servers see it as a reflection of ...


1

It would be illegal to buy alcoholic beverages, and depending on where you are, it might be illegal to consume them, but for the most part, if you drink in a private setting, you are safe. Parents frequently allow their underage children to drink at home, and are only arrested for doing so if they also allow other people's children to drink as well. Don't ...


1

Typically you are always subject to the laws of the jurisdiction you are in unless you have diplomatic immunity. So if you are in the US, the US drinking laws apply to you. If you are in Germany, the German drinking laws apply to you. Your nationality doesn't matter - the laws of the place you are in matter.


1

Just for additional information and warning: A lot of restaurants in New England and along the Canadian border will add an automatic 18% gratuity to your bill. This means they've decided how much you're going to tip and put it on your bill. They will always tell you that they're adding it, or forewarn you that it will be added... but only ever in small ...


1

No, you will not be able to drink legally within the United States. Purchasing alcoholic beverages as a minor, or knowingly purchasing alcohol for a minor, are both criminal offenses in all 50 states. Conversely, if someone underage were to travel to Australia and drink with you, then as long as they're old enough under Australian law, they are allowed ...


7

The short answer to the question is no: local laws apply everywhere you go, and the standard minimum drinking age in the United States is 21. The long answer is that yes, it is absolutely legal for someone under the age of 21 to purchase and consume alcohol in the United States— in certain areas, under the right circumstances. But those circumstances will ...


9

Simply put, no. As an UK immigrant myself, first arriving at age 19 (and effectively drinking in the UK since age 16) I certainly experienced this first hand. You have to be 21. Significantly, age is nearly always determined by requesting and reviewing a drivers license which has a picture of the person plus the date of birth. This is unlike my ...


-5

Drinking laws apply to the area you are in, Not the area you came from. In the United States the legal drinking limit is 21. HOWEVER I have been drinking since the age 18(now 29) :). If you know people, you will have fun.


1

In Hungary you may build a fire/have a barbecue while respecting the general rules of campfires (stay far from the forest area, clean the land of dry stuff before lighting a fire, put it out when you leave etc.). During the year the state officialities may issue "fire restriction periods" which are made public on websites and radio (but unfortunately only in ...


18

Age limits and such like are always those of the place you are in. While you are in another country you have to obey the local laws on drink, and other stuff, whatever your laws are back home. The good news is that you can do things that are legal in the place you are, even if they are illegal back home (with some exceptions), which is great news if you are ...


6

The answer in the broad sense is maybe. Due to State vs. Federal application of laws there are circumstances in which people under the age of 21 are allowed to drink within the state. But you will not be allowed to do this at a bar!! And you will not be allowed to purchase at the store! Some states may allow it in a presence of a parent. So if you are ...


50

The federal standards (that states lose highway funds for not following) are that you cannot purchase or publicly possess alcoholic beverages under the age of 21. Technically this is implemented as state laws, but it applies in all 50 states and DC. That means neither of you can buy alcohol legally. In addition, the general rule is that you can't ask someone ...


4

The quality of the food is irrelevant to the tip. The cook gets payed a full wage and does not receive any of the tip. Therefore your only concern when deciding how much to tip should be on the service provided by the waiter or waitress. DO NOT reward the service staff for the work of the kitchen. Personally, if I get bad service then I tip about half of ...


3

While in the US, you should definitely tip. This should only be based on the service; you're tipping your waiter/waitress, NOT the cook. I generally use 20% as my starting point, if I don't feel that they did a good job I'll drop down to 15% (or further if need be). Likewise, I'll go up to 30% if I feel like the server really earned it. In almost all cases, ...


1

In all but the most exceptional circumstances try to tip between 10-20% (even 10 is a bit low) however certain scenarios would definitely lean towards not following this standard, keep reading for my own personal example. I went to a Chili's restaurant for dinner, it wasn't busy at all and we were seated immediately. Our server took our order and then we ...


1

A feedback to the managerial staff of how the waiter/waitress served you will do it I believe. However it the food is great surely leaving a tip is something that can be consider, since in the kitchen there are some dedicating cook that are making everything they can to put a smile on your face when you're leaving the restaurant.


1

2 Raw Cafés in Lima facebook.com/rawcafeclub probably more but we love the Raw Café, highly recommend the Nuggets and the Pizza Classic, the Burger is great too ;) in Cusco I know the GreenPoint with vegan and raw option, only a few contain gluten but it's all marked greenpointveganrestaurant.com and the Shaman Vegan Raw Restaurant shamancenter.org in ...


6

I've never received such poor service that the waitperson did not deserve a tip for their time. Most cases where the server did the worst job, they were obviously in, or just out of, training and still slightly overwhelmed. I typically use 15% as a starting point. If it was on the extreme end of bad, I'll play fast and loose, maybe round to the nearest $1 ...


2

Dried fruits in packages are not a problem. Fresh fruits are prohibited. If the masala chai is in a factory package it should be fine as well. If it is home packed or from a fresh market, then USDA inspectors would have the final say.


10

In many locations, tips are not only for the waitstaff, but are actually shared with the busboys, the bartender, and sometimes other members of the staff - usually not the cooks, but even occasionally then. They're also a significant fraction of their wages, most waiters earning a few dollars an hour "plus tips" rather than a full, normal wage. When I ...


27

cdkMoose is correct in that the quality of the food should not influence your tip. However, your question appears to operate on a bit of a false premise, and I think it should also be said that leaving a small tip for poor service should be done only in exceptional circumstances. By exceptional circumstances, I mean active hostilty or extreme rudeness on ...


56

Tipping is for the service, the menu price is for the food. If the service is bad, leave a small tip. This will show the wait person that you didn't forget to tip, but felt that their service was undeserving. On the converse, it is important not to leave a poor tip if the food was bad but the service was good. The wait staff can not make the food ...


16

I like to tip them the smallest value coin I have; that way they knew I didn't forget a tip. Then I talk to the manager or email feedback.


4

Typical food from Portugal. I will write the names in Portuguese and whenever possible translate it. Some of the dish names are dedicated to someone (their creator or restaurant that first served it) and some are named after the cooking process or the cooking device where it's made. Its hard to translate since some of these are really Portuguese types of ...


0

Yes, Berlin is somewhat cheaper than other places in Western Europe. Eating out tends to be more expensive elsewhere in Germany, in the South or West of course but even in places like Magdeburg or Leipzig or in small towns. In Berlin, you can certainly find a Mittagstisch or street food (Currywurst, Döner) for about €5. At the same time, while the economy ...


1

What is one meant to do with the water? Simply drink it after your coffee (hot chocolate) or if you prefer at the middle of it - it does not have any specific rule: instead it's for your pleasure. Although to my experience they generally come with a sparkling (frizzante /frɪtˈzante/) shot of water rather than normal ones. Beside the points @JoErNanO ...


11

The practice of accompanying an espresso with a glass of water is typical in southern Italy, and in particular in Naples in which coffee is something of a mystical ritual. Recently other establishments across Italy (and worldwide) have begun following this practice. High-end places might serve you a glass of water as an implicit statement saying that their ...


0

Not a South African, but I have family there. Piemans Pantry is a very popular brand in South Africa. The products are also available in supermarkets. In North Krugersdorp (in Gauteng and near Johannesburg), we got pasties and meat pies from a shop that is owned by a family friend called The Food Farm with a connected The Factory Shop. The Factory Shop ...


9

From personal experience, between 6 and 9 PM but in some cases later. I usually eat early and did get dinners at 6 PM, most diners did come in around 7, the time I left, but in some more expensive places people would just come in around that time and make reservations for later in the evening. I would say, like in many countries, it depends on the class of ...


0

To add to the excellent answers above: you should always bring some food onto the plane in case you get hungry during mid-flight. Some of the common food I seen are bread, sandwiches, and instant noodles (the flight staff should be able to provide hot water).


6

Generally, on long-haul flights food is served shortly after start and then again shortly before landing. As a rule, the higher the class, the closer to takeoff/landing the food will be served. Because there are less people in higher classes, it's faster to go around with the drinks first. The airline usually try to have the longest possible time in which ...


7

As mentioned in an answer to another similar question, the best source for this kind of information is the website of the airline itself. In your case, ANA has a page, where you can choose your route and it will give you the menu for the flight. As it is called 'lunch/dinner', you can probably safely assume that the food will be served not too long after ...


-2

If you want Spaghetti Bolognese, go to Bologna! I once ordered Spaghetti Bolognese in Genova, Italy. The waiter told me: "If you want Spaghetti Bolognese, go to Bologna!", then she served pasta & pesto which is typical for Genova. Rudeness aside, it's good point: why travel half the globe to sit and eat the same thing as you have at home? In Italy ...


2

The UK wasn't one of the destinations you mentioned, but I suspect the situation is similar. Firstly, most UK restaurants describing themselves as Indian are in fact Bangladeshi or Pakistani run. Secondly, the food you get served there is nothing like the food you get in India (or, as I've been told, Pakistan or Bangladesh). The main differences (to my ...


21

Specific to Paris (and vegetarian food) : There are many Indian restaurants next to Gare du Nord, on Rue du Faubourg Saint-Denis, which has a significant Tamil presence. Passage Brady has many Indian restaurants too. Quality can vary, but I specifically recommend two restaurants, Sangeetha and Saravana Bhavan, both Chennai-based south Indian vegetarian ...


1

If it's anything like Australia: ask a taxi driver! We have many Indian taxi drivers here and they always know the best, cheapest Indian restaurants. I'm from the UK and I know the situation is the same there, but I'm not so sure about mainland Europe, sorry. I've travelled a lot, and it is definitely always possible to find Indian food. You want to avoid ...


4

In addition to the kebabs, falafels, pizzas and US-style burger joints European cities have their own variants of cheap, available, mostly eat-on-your-feet food. These are not as healthy as the Asian counterparts, unfortunately. Netherlands: Patat (french fries), kroket (deep fried thing with pulverised meat), and other meaty products like frikandel, and ...


8

When I left the UK to live in germany I missed Indian food more than anything. These days it's easy: Google is your friend. There are Indian restaurants everywhere. If you check out Trip Advisor you will even get reviews, though they are sometimes suspect.



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