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14

As you wish dining allows for more flexibility for when you want to eat. The main difference being who you are being served by. Flexible dining (As you wish) allows you to eat as early as the dining room opens, to later in the evening. Depending on different factors, you may prefer one over the other. Here's some pros/cons. Flexible/As You Wish ...


21

The benefit really depends on your desires. Second seating (or any other set seating) gives you a set time to eat, a guaranteed place to sit at that time and usually the same waiter throughout the sailing who learns your dining preferences. The As You Wish lets you choose your dining time each day, but like any other restaurant there is no guarantee that ...


17

This is a very contentious topic on some other boards. However, given the way you ask the question, you should probably choose As You Wish. Up until a few years ago, practically all Main Dining Room service was based on First and Second Seating. You would sit at the same table, same table mates, same wait staff and same time every night. Some people ...


2

As a matter of anecdote, my relatives brought whole bags of fruit from e.g. Hong Kong. Don't think you need to declare it or anything. It is customary to bring food from travels in Russia, even if there exist laws that de jure prohibit it.


3

The food you're bringing should be ok. There's no mention of fruit in the list of prohibited items on the Russian customs website, and since that's the ultimate authority (albeit with a strange English translation) my answer is, it's ok. I found no mention of fruit or peanut butter anywhere else (though those were all traveller-type blogs) including ...


5

Aperitivo? Apericena? Aperiwhat? In the traditional sense, an aperitivo is a pre-dinner drink, where pre-dinner means that it is usually consumed before having dinner. It can be either alcoholic or non-alcoholic and its purpose is to open up one's appetite before the meal. In order to fully open up one's appetite, the aperitivo is usually accompanied by a ...


13

Note: I am Italian, and travelled my homeland peninsula from north to south, and from west to east. Sorry to contradict some of the previous answers, but no, aperitivo/apericena are not limited to the Milan area. Maybe it started as a cultural movement in the north of Italy, but I can assure you that nowadays (well, it is since I can remember - that would ...


8

The question is rather broad, I'll try to answer each point. Each answer is based on my experience and can be very subjective. Aperitivo experience greatly vary. It's about meeting with friends or colleagues after work, having a couple of drinks which come with something tasty to eat. How can I find out whether a specific bar offers an aperitivo? Some ...


4

FWIW My experience in Milan is that it varies from place to place. Sometimes it is complimentary if you are drinking, sometimes you pay extra with your first (or second...) drink to have food as well. The food might become free at the end of the evening if you have been there for a while and there are leftovers. Sometimes it is a modest mid-evening snack, ...


6

You're asking a lot of questions, and I can answer a few of them. First, I was under the impression that the aperitivo was something more of the Milan area, but perhaps it has grown into a much wider phenomenon. When I first encountered it, I definitely thought it was a phenomenon. There does not seem to be an online resource to find out about places ...


-1

The 'buffet' style this article you mention talks about is not common. In general you can expect a plate of small snacks, not a full meal. The buffets will definitely be more expensive than 4 euro, so I doubt if it'll really be that 'cheap dinner' you talk about. But I guess that depends on how much you eat.


1

There is a sign at the security control at the departure gates at Bole Airport that says "berbere (cultural spices)" is not allowed in hand luggage. So it seems that in addition to berbere, mitmita etc would not be allowed. I cannot find the reason for this, but would be interested to know.


3

Processed pepperoni This is a bit unclear, one paragraph says they're prohibited and another says canned and unopened pork products are ok. I think you should be careful with this one and leave the pepperoni unopened. Fresh (chilled or frozen), dried, cured, and fully cooked meat is generally prohibited from most countries. [...] Pork should be ...


1

The terms and conditions for a Qantas flight I'm on explicitly mentions that JetStar usually doesn't supply food and beverage as an inclusion. This suggests that they aren't merely bluffing about not supplying it: Jetstar (JQ) & Jetstar Asia (3K) Flights - Onboard Inclusions/Exclusions Food, beverages and entertainment are not included in most ...


53

Since 2015, restaurants in Czech Republic have to use standardized food allergy charts. Since the standardized allergens are numbered, restaurants often list just the numbers for each food, with a legend available (but the legend may be only in Czech). This is based on EU regulation 1169/2011, which lists the allergens in Annex II: Cereals containing ...


5

With regards to alternatives, how about carrying a spork? Some designs such as the Tritensil seem to get good reviews. You might want to look at some comparison sites for reviews, such as this one or this one. Some more novel types of spork on Amazon:


4

I often travel with a couple of plastic spoons and forks in my hand luggage, these usually live in my hand bag and nobody ever noticed them when going through security, not even when the contents of the bag was hand searched. One item that did stand for good use for quite a time was a 'spork' that I got with a baked potato in Newcastle, UK. It did have a ...


1

It is not allowed: If you are travelling from a country outside the EU, you cannot bring any meat or dairy products into the UK unless you are travelling from the Faroe Islands, Greenland or Iceland, when you are allowed a combined weight of up to 10kg per person. You may bring in a limited quantity of other animal products, such as fish, ...


7

You are free to pack these with you in checked luggage (the items have to be sheathed or otherwise covered); the restriction is for carry-on luggage only. Generally speaking, anything that can be used as a weapon is prohibited on board the aircraft. In some places, the restrictions are more tough than others. In the US, for example, anything that can be ...


1

I recall once that a special-order meal got mixed up and there weren't enough of them (vegetarian), so the cabin crew scrounged around and came up with a couple meals' worth of snacks and the safe sides of extra meals for that person, instead... and with the offer of more, if they were still hungry after. Obviously this was something of a special ...


5

It depends where you want to deliver goods, at least in case of nemlig.com: http://www.nemlig.com/om-nemligcom/hvor-leverer-vi.aspx# Check zip number, they deliver things in Copenhagen area and in some towns on Zealand island. Minimum order is 400 DKR. You can contact their customer service via telephone number +4570337233 or use chat function under '...


4

Depending on how much preparation you need to do. My advice is to use the local 7-Eleven or Circle K convenience stores. The vast majority of them will come equipped with a boiling water tap and a microwave. You will also find that you will never be more than a few paces from the nearest convenience store. We don't like to walk in Hong Kong, because its ...


14

Cook anything in hotel room with our pressure cooker and/or with our induction stove. Standard at pretty much every hotel around the world. Fire hazard. Don't allow their restaurant' kitchen for this 5 minute cooking thing. Standard at pretty much every restaurant around the world. Health, safety, fire etc. Are you familiar with a commercial gas ...


5

for cheaper alternatives try a youth hostel: http://www.hostelworld.com/hostels/Hong-Kong/Hong-Kong But be sure to verify that it is a licensed Guest House. You're supposed to prepare your own food in most of these hostels, so it should be exactly what you want. Also, avoid Chungking Mansions at all costs which is reserved for adventurers.


22

Rent an apartment hotel (serviced apartment) or an Airbnb apartment instead. These always include kitchens and basic cooking utensils. Also, in Hong Kong you can trust product labeling: if commercial baby food says "no dairy" on it, it won't contain any dairy.


3

Yes, he probably can - with leeway for the fact sometimes some guards may refuse (the probably is 'more yesses than noes', not 'never no'). Higher chances of getting through happen with food leaning towards solid, visible, identifiable. My parents travel a lot, and often carry homemade food for the same reasons (health, preference, vegetarian). They have ...



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