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2

I was going to comment on gmauch's answer but my reputation points don't allow me to. I have personally brought tea and sweets (and other food products) into Canada more than once from Europe. You will have no problem at all bringing them in.


5

According to Canadian Food Inspection Agency in the section Products allowed into Canada from countries other than the United States you are Ok bringing herbs, spices and tea, so your bags and leaves of tea should not be a problem. About candies it says you can bring up to 20Kg, which should also be enough, right? Be advised that these requirements may be ...


6

I went to Japan on Feb. 2014, I am allergic to shellfish. I did a lot of research. First thing, it is illegal to bring an epi-pen to Japan and almost impossible to get a special permit to get them in the country. I got the printed card and also a pandora charm that said I was allergic to shellfish. I carried with me Benadryl everywhere. Server at restaurants ...


2

It sounds like you are referring to kilishi, which is very thin strips of meat spiced and sun-dried. If it were from another country, the answer would be maybe. Commercially packaged shelf-stable beef products are sometimes admissible. However, there are exceptions: It will be very difficult to bring any sort of meat from Nigeria into the US because of the ...


2

CBP tends to confiscate meat products. You might find this site helpful.


23

Refusing to eat totally is indeed very rude. In fact, it might be taken as an insult if you were the main guest. Anyway, you can always ask for a plate and a spoon, fill the plate and eat the way you are used to. This will totally save the situation and will be understood positively since people know how foreigners eat, but not eating at all is something ...


4

Ok, my initial disclaimer is this answer is based purely off second-hand or worse knowledge, i.e. Googling. Malacca is definitely on my list of places to get to, but I haven't been there yet so no first-hand knowledge. There appears to be at least one restaurant that calls out some Chitty influences: Amy Heritage Nyonya Cuisine Melaka’s nyonya ...


4

I would suggest renting a room with Airbnb. Very often hosts allow guests to use the kitchen. This is usually specified in the listing description. A quick search for Fajardo reveals 500+ rental offers (rooms and apartments) meaning you have plenty of choice location-wise. As a corollary to this idea you could rent a full flat thus having the guarantee of ...


3

According to hostels.com and hostelworld.com, there is at least one hostel in Fajardo, Puerto Rico, called the Moon Bay hostel. Their list of facilities includes "Full kitchen with brand new appliances!" so with little doubt you can buy your own food and cook it at the hostel. I haven't seen any picture of the kitchen among the pictures shown though, just a ...


2

Adding a new answer on 14 Feb 2015 to cite an article in the New York Times which was published on 11 Feb 2015... Failing the availability of a course... The New York Times published an article The Kitchen-Counter Chocolatiers along with a brilliant photo essay Chocolate Making at Home which provides some tips you may find helpful in connecting with small ...


12

While the answer from a Parisian is probably 'all over' or 'my local patisserie', for those among us who aren't locals, Pierre Hermé (72 Rue Bonaparte, 75006 Paris, France) is probably a good place to start. However, they tend to use it as part of other desserts, like their Gateau: Dacquoise biscuit with crunchy hazelnuts, hazelnut crisp, thin wafers ...


5

Yes, there always are customs laws. Free import: 1kg of coffee; 1kg of instant coffee; 500g of tea; 1kg of chocolate; 1kg food made of sugar; Prohibited Meat and dairy products Free export: Local drinks and foodstuffs up to a total value of TRY 100, each commodity not to exceed 5 kgs Prohibited ...


10

Let me start by saying that chocolate making is not something that is a very common past time even for us Swiss people (at least not if you are talking making chocolate from scratch). Nevertheless I think you have several options here. Those will also mostly depend on whether your wife is fluent either in French or German: Cooking courses for local people ...


0

Some coffeeshops may also have them. For example it seems that some Espresso Royale branches (Midwest) have microwaves. For chains like Espresso Royale, I don't think the staff there will really give a damn if you microwave your curry for a few minutes; indeed, they probably won't even notice.


0

I don't know if this also applies in the US, but I've notices that Mcdonald usually have a microwave in their fast food restaurants. I think they are meant for heating baby food.


11

In addition to the other excellent answers, from personal experience when you are farther away from larger highways there are less likely to be large "truck stops" and travel centers. However, gas stations are generally run by clerks who are usually bored and generally friendly, and they rarely if ever object to you using the gas station microwave for your ...


13

You can buy a microwave that operates on 12 volts. They aren't as powerful as mains voltage ones (600 watts or so, compared to 1500 watts) but they do the trick. You can buy them from places that cater to RVers or mail order. Here is one example Note that even at 600 watts, the current draw is 55 amps. You should plan on wiring it directly to your car ...


17

TA Travel centers and similar truck-stop like facilities might be your best bet. They cater to people spending lots of time on the road. They often have showers and other facilities that go beyond regular retail restaurant/gas station stops


0

Try a city specific expat-focused website. Shenzhen Party, Shanghaiist, Beijinger, etc etc. Lots of Engl language content about the eateries around town.


0

I've checked numerous freeze-sensitive things over the years. Once, back in the 80s I had damage (and that from a 1-hr flight.) Since then everything has been fine, even on very long flights.


2

Hi I'm a flight attendant and have checked in freeze sensitive items like the above (wines , cheese... even champagne and a whole clingwrapped roasted duck) to bring home throughout my 2-year career. Yes, it's only 2 years but I do check in such stuff frequently (between monthly and quarterly basis). I would stow them quickly in the fridge when I get home. ...



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