Hot answers tagged

24

No you can't turn up late to check-in on a delayed flight, unless the check-in closing time is delayed along with the departure time. Note that usually this is not the case. The check-in closing time is set relative to the scheduled departure, and usually remains the same, regardless of whether the flight is delayed or not. Hence if you show up at the ...


24

Ryanair moved all its flights to Charleroi according to their own communication with the original flight times until at least the 29th. You are right that Charleroi can not accommodate all flights for all airlines from Zaventem. But not all airlines are moving to Charleroi. Some are moving to other airports and others are cancelling. As an example, Brussels ...


15

FlightStats has information going back several years. Their level of coverage is generally excellent, although it can vary a little depending on the airline/location. You will need to create a free account in order to view data more than a few days old. Specifically for your flight they don't have any specific information, only scheduled information that ...


12

Yes, and No. Flight numbers do frequently get used for multiple flights on the same day. For example today UA712 is used for both a Chicago to San Diego flight and a subsequent San Diego to San Francisco flight. In this case, both of these flights used the same aircraft (an Airbus A320, United "ship" number 4616). On Saturday, UA338 will fly from Salt ...


10

No, you cannot. This information is not available to the public nor is it obtainable from the airline(s) without some court order. I would imagine it is near impossible for even normal law enforcement to get it as there is no "show me anyone who has a flight booked on this date" query possible (as far as I know), since this information is distributed ...


9

I believe that using a website like flightstats (http://www.flightstats.com/go/Home/home.do) will do the job. You can search by route, flight or airport. If that does not work, checking the arrival airport's website normally lists all arrivals on the date of your choice as well as where they arrive from and what airline. That would probably do the trick if ...


8

Once you bought it, you are pretty much stuck with it. Some airlines offer a 24 hour grace period for canceling or re-booking, but a week later you are out of luck. If your ticket's fare rules allow changes, you might be able to get the better (non-stop) flight, but the change fees will wipe out any fare difference and probably end up costing you more.


7

Your name is not a unique identifier, and as such is insufficient to identify you. However, it is likely that your organization has provided either your Identity Card number of Passport number when it reserved in your stead, and THIS is a unique identifier. Likewise if you have a frequent flyer number. The next hurdle is that there is no central repository ...


7

It depends on the terms and conditions of the airline you booked with, and your country's laws, but in general the most you will ever get back from an airline in a case like this is to allow you to cancel the flight and get a full refund. That's also the norm for major changes to a flight. Your description of the conversation so far sounds like that of an ...


7

There's a service called Flightradar24, and they have this to say in the description: In addition to ADS-B data, we also get data from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) in the United States. This data is based on radar data and includes all commercial air traffic in US and Canadian air space (i.e. not just planes with ADS-B transponders). Unlike ...


7

One of the provided answers is wrong, at least in the UK (and probably throughout the EU). Under the Data Protection Act you have the right to request any and all data that a company has recorded about you (with some exceptions) and even in some cases, data which is not about you but has some direct effect upon you. Taking the legal route, you would have to ...


6

Flights get cancelled for a variety of reasons, but cancelling simply due to insufficent passengers is not a common one. Every plane has multiple uses during the day and cancelling flight A means the plane is not in position for flight B or flight C. It also means flight crews are no longer in the right place. Weather cancellations can come from upline, ...


6

Try FlightAware.com. Like FlightRadar24 and Flightwise, FlightAware provides information about flights in progress such as geographic coordinates, radar track, and current speed an altitude. Unlike the others, however, FlightAware offers a unique URL for each flight, including future flights, that can be bookmarked or distributed in emails or other messages. ...


5

FlightView.com has great reports on historic flights (I work in sales there). They're the only flight data provider which are selected as consultants to the FAA, so you know you're getting the most accurate data.


5

I don't have any evidence for it but I suspect it might be necessary to satisfy APIS requirements. If you can provide a nickname, you could conceivably evade automatic checks against no-fly lists and similar databases. Also, many people (e.g. from places like Indonesia) go by names that are completely different from what's on their passport. As @pnuts ...


5

You ever heard of 'Rule of Acquisition #5'? Once you have their money, you never give it back. That applies here too, but: 'non-refundable' does not necessarily mean 'lost' - most airlines allow to cancel or change the flight, and the price gets 'stored' with them for up to twelve months (counting from the day you bought the ticket, not when you canceled). ...


4

It's fairly common for a single flight number to cover multiple flight segments (legs): for example, Qantas flight 1 (QF1) is both Sydney to Dubai and Dubai to London. In the US, it's apparently common to use the same flight number on separate services flown by separate planes, leading to situations like yours. I don't think this serves any practical ...


4

I've flown to Iceland 7 times in the last 4 years from London and have always used one of the following airlines Iceland air Wow (formally Iceland Express) Iceland Air is the better carrier - more legroom, en flight entertainment, luggage included etc. Whereas Wow is the budget option and you have to pay for everything (booking, paying by credit card, ...


4

I believe you're probably interested in something like Flightradar24.com - you enter the flight in, and you can see exactly where it is, altitude, speed etc. I've used it on a regular basis for when relatives or friends are flying in to my city.


4

I think those two cancellations are just isolated instances. I have found another website which logs the LYS-IST route and in a span of about a month, those are the only cancellations shown. Airportia - TK1808/THY1808 - LYS to IST Flight History


3

Tackling the real issue of finding out the location instead of getting the information from the airlineā€¦ Have you attempted to grab the information from the intermediaries? For instancem the company may be booking through the same intermediary every year. In that case, you may be able to know from them which weather to expect by asking the "right ...


3

In your particular case you might know when the flight leaves because it's unlikely another plane materializes but in general you need to be quite vigilant: it happened to me that the delay was decreased! Say, you show up for a flight to leave at 1pm, the flight now shows at 3pm but then it boards at 2pm and leaves at 2:30pm. You need to be vigilant with ...


2

The flight tracker websites actually have an incentive to not be exactly correct, and they argue that this is for security. The cynical mind would suggest it just gives them a bit of a cost saving when it comes to information polling, updates etc. Generally they will be within five minutes or so and reasonably accurate on flight paths (around here they ...


2

Via the NYTimes I found that TripIt can serve as an itinerary repository that can be shared. People can then use this repository to check flight status. With the map tab, my itinerary should be able to make magic-lines on a map as my trip progresses.


2

It seems you want to build or use specifically a web app. Still, the recently updated Kayak app for iOS allows you to track flights, as does the even more recently updated Flight+, which has a rather gorgeous interface.


2

You ask if it's legal. Yes, otherwise as for the reasons explained in the other answers, airlines could not operate delayed or multi leg flights using the number, To expand on the other answers you need to remember that each plane has its own identifiers, so when an airline books a slot with air traffic control it will be saying,for example, Plane GB-AAA , ...


2

Most frequent flights from Reykjavik are to London and Copenhagen. Some possibilities for an overnight stay other than London or Copenhagen are Paris, Amsterdam, Oslo or Stockholm. You can see a list of airlines that fly to Reykjavik on this page: http://www.kefairport.is/English/Service/Airlines/ Link to the website of the KEF airport: ...


2

Via the Thomas Cook airlines website I found that the flight on September 21 has the number TCX2354 and on September 22 it has the number TCX2774.


2

The check-in time has no relation to the flight being delayed. The counter will close on time, even if the flight never departs on time. This is because there are other things that need to happen for the flight to leave that are dependent on the check-in desk: Passenger manifest. Seat reservations/upgrades/changes. Luggage has to be tagged, the tags have ...



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