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18

Daytime, there are two very good options: HSL bus 615 is easy and affordable. The trip to central railway station costs 5€ and takes some 35 mins. The bus runs every 10-20 minutes between 06:30 and 00:30 on weekdays (Sat 07:00-1:00, Sun 06:05-00:30). (From city to airport, first departure is 05:10 and last 22:45.) At the airport it leaves from T1 ...


17

Are there any current major Finnish cities where the architecture is medieval, or at least "pre modern" (before the late 1600s)? In short, no. Compared to most countries in central and southern Europe, Finland has very few remaining medieval buildings (or indeed buildings older than 100-200 years, sadly). Most buildings back then were wooden (and ...


17

I don't know if boarding a freighter by asking around in the port or approaching the ship's captain is still possible nowadays, many things I read suggest it is not. In a large port like Rotterdam, there is also no way to get anywhere near most ships without a car and some credential. On the other hand, there are many opportunities to travel on a freighter ...


16

The Danish police and the Schengen calculator are right, and the Finnish border guard must be severely confused about the rules he's supposed to administer. (It sounds to me as if he thought a 6-month period started when she entered on July 1, and that she would need to be present at the border for some formalities when the next 6-month period starts. That ...


16

Certainly, there are lots of campsites in Finland. Even better, Finland has the concept of 'jokamiehenoikeus' or freedom to roam, and : "One may stay or set up camp temporarily in the countryside, a reasonable distance from homes, pick mineral samples, wild berries, mushrooms and flowers (as long as they are not protected species)." What you might ...


14

In short, no. Even the Yrjönkatu pool is a bit of a historical quirk that has probably survived largely thanks to general conservatism (it's Finland's oldest and operated very much the way it did in 1928) and patronage from Helsinki's gay district Eerikinkatu (conveniently located right next door) — no, it's not a gay club or anything, but even ...


14

As Ilmari commented, the recent NY Times travel blog post by "frugaltraveler" is very good. It even mentions my favorite bar, Pub Magneetti. I like his other recommendations too: free concerts & somewhat hippie atmosphere at Alppipuisto; public sauna in Kallio; berry-picking). Some more ideas below. Many of these may not be "only in Helsinki" things, ...


13

This heavily depends on the type of train you are planning to use. In general there are 5 different type of trains you can use with your Interrail/Eurail pass regional trains which are included in a pass and no reservations are possible trains with reservations available but not compulsory. If you don't buy such a reservation before boarding the train you ...


11

K-18 tickets are for people 18+ and it means that they're selling alcohol, usually. If you have a non-K 18 ticket, you don't get access to the seperate bar area.


11

No, there are no passenger trains between Finland and Sweden. There is actually a train line crossing the border between Haparanda and Tornio, but it is currently (since 1988) only used by freight trains. Coming from Sweden, you could take a train to Luleå, from which you have to bridge about 160km on the bus to Kemi, where you will have access to the ...


10

As a Chinese national, you can stay within Helsinki airport up to 24 hours whilst in transit without a visa - however you will need to remain in the international "air-side" area. There are two hotels in the airport (GLO and Hilton), however both are outside of security so you will not be able to access them without a visa. There are also a number of other ...


10

Yes, you can. Finland is part of the Schengen Area, which means US passport holders may enter without requiring a visa for up to 90 days within any 180 day period.


10

Because you are an EU national you have the right of free movement inside EU. The national ID card is enough, the portuguese one is called Cartão de Cidadão.


8

You can buy reindeer meat (poronliha) in any supermarket. The "Herkku" gourmet supermarket in the basement of the Stockmann department store (corner of Mannerheimintie and Aleksanterinkatu) is pretty epic and a good place to buy this or anything else Finnish; not the cheapest, mind you, but not hugely expensive either. The canonical way to prepare it is ...


8

If you were willing to pay approx. 8–9 euros for lunch, there would be lots of good options. For example: Satkar Kamppi (Nepalese restaurant, tripadvisor, home page): vegetarian options in the lunch menu for 8.40 euros. Note that the quoted prices in the lunch menus are precisely what you will pay (assuming you drink water). There are no additional taxes ...


8

A city that is very near to Helsinki (maybe 1 hour by direct bus connection) is Porvoo. There are some medieval buildings remaining, but unfortunately it is also very touristy. You can also visit it from Helsinki by boat or train.


8

Yes, as long as you have a valid multiple entry Schengen visa, you can enter and exit the Schengen territory as many times as you want. Which in this case means you're allowed to fly from the UK to Finland. Of course, you need to have a separate visa for the UK if you need one.


8

A couple of pointers: Tennispalatsi (Helsinki Art Museum) There will be two ongoing exhibitions in December: Akseli Gallen-Kallela - European Master The Power of Colour - Works from the Collections of the State Tretyakov Gallery Akseli Gallen-Kallela: Ad astra, 1907 Tip: free entrace to Tennispalatsi on Fridays :) [Or at least used to be - I'm trying ...


7

I can at least answer the question for Suomenlinna. Take the ferry over there which takes approximately 15 minutes and leaves quite regularly from Helsinki's city center (Market Square). Then it really depends on your taste. You can easily spend a whole day on Suomenlinna. There are bars where you can get a drink, very tasty restaurants, some museums and ...


7

Right, it seems Porvoo ain't much of a beach town (unlike, say, Hanko, another Helsinki day trip destination). Here's what I found out. Immediately north of the main tourist area, there's Maari (Maren) where you can "you can dip your toes in the water" according to tourist info lady. But this is river water, and she couldn't say if it's clean enough for ...


7

You will almost certainly be better off buying a separate SIM for each country. This may change in the next few years as roaming charges may be eliminated completely within the EU, but for now separate SIMs for each country is the best option. Personally, I use the following : In the UK, I use O2. The SIM is "free" and available from any number of shops, ...


7

Helsinki (and Finland itself) has been characterized by a number wild, free-spirited innovators. Two main sites illustrate this point: One is the so-called rock church. It was built at the location of a huge rock that no one thought could be moved. The architects were laughed at for "trying." But they didn't MOVE the rock, they carved the church out of the ...


7

Each playroom coach have 4 regular seats that can be reserved, no surcharge applies. Just book your ticket normally at the VR Shop, making sure to select one of the trains equipped with a playroom of course. Look for the little teddy bear icon next to Services: Then "continue to seat selection", and request a seat "Next to Playroom": Note that you ...


6

Roads in Finland are good, although not luxurious. Helsinki-Tampere is all motorway, as is the last part of Lappeenranta-Helsinki, the rest you'll be driving on two-lane country highways. In short, any of those cars should be just fine. There are a few quirks to driving in Finland explained in detail at Wikivoyage, the main one being that you always need ...


6

Seurasaari is quite similar to Suomenlinna, only smaller. A straight circuit of the island on foot takes about an hour, but there are plenty of interesting old buildings to poke your nose into (most free, a few not), a couple of nice rustic cafes and even two nudist beaches (one for men, one for women), so it's easy to spend half a day here as well. Most ...


6

Legally you can, although you will have to convince the officer at the border control that you have clear intentions of leaving to Finland very soon and your visit to Germany is definitely temporary. Your residence permit in Finland allows staying in other Schengen countries up to 90 days of any 180-day period.


6

According to EGTRE, the single rail border crossing between Sweden and Finland carries freight only. Sweden and Finland use different track gauges, and freight is transshipped between Swedish and Finnish cars in Harparanda. The line across the border is dual-gauge, but according to EGTRE the standard-gauge track does not see regular use.


6

The UK has a perfectly nice Helsinki embassy, so this isn't an issue of remote location. It's a great location, but British posts abroad require an authorised 'visa section' before they can issue visas and the embassy in Finland does not have one. This is the standard case for all British missions in the Scandinavian region. Is Finland an exceptional ...


5

First of all let me say I am not from Helsinki, or even a Fin myself. But I have visited several times. You mention local people places, here's a Google map I made with some marked spots. The fortress island to the south is not a place where locals venture much. But I thought I'd still point it out. If you're interested in that sort of thing it might suit ...


5

I wrote a blog post about my trip to Suomelinna - it's doable as a half day trip, if you want, but you could also take a picnic and enjoy the grassy areas if it's nice and sunny (beware, it was freezing with an off-shore breeze in summer when I was there). The boat takes 15-20 minutes including boarding. Wikitravel has several guides for Helsinki - ...



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