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23

Let me first state that I've lived in Dubai for a solid 19 years (years 0 to 19). In these 19 years, I have done almost everything there is to do in Dubai and been almost every place there is to go (including going to night clubs even though I was under age). At the outset, let me clarify this: I'd wish to visit Dubai with my girlfriend, but after ...


14

Various online sources (Lonely Planet, Tripadvisor, USA Today, Dubai FAQ) seem to agree that as long as you don't start making out in public and telling people that you're not married, or attract the attention of the police in other ways, you'll be breaking the law but are very unlikely to get into trouble. People in general, and hotel staff especially ...


12

Maybe you know it already, but might be helpful for other readers, too: wheelmap.org It's an OpenStreetMap where users can mark if places/buildings are wheelchair accessible. You can filter the map to only show places related to tourism. Also, at least in Germany, some cities/areas have accessibility guides that list accessible hotels, free time ...


12

Further to earlier answers, the information given so far is bit vague and so might mislead. The EU spouse has very strong rights to travel freely within the whole of the EU (Schengen is irrelevant to this) with their spouse and children. These rights include the right for the Third Country national to live indefinitely and work in the member state ...


12

The official Source of Truth(tm): http://europa.eu/youreurope/citizens/residence/worker-pensioner/non-eu-family-members/spouses-children-parents_en.htm In particular: http://europa.eu/youreurope/citizens/travel/entry-exit/non-eu-family/index_en.htm Your registered partner and extended family - siblings, cousins, aunts, uncles, and so on – can ask the ...


11

I think you'd be pleasantly surprised by the museums - they're VERY interesting and not at all dry, especially the new Darwin Center at the Natural History Museum. People tend to be quite polarised about the London Eye - but the ability to go up high above central London in a glass ball is fun for all. Richmond Park (if walking is ok) is a great trip ...


9

Take the Docklands Light Railway from the Bank. The trip is scenic past some very modern buildings built around the old docks of London. It is also cool with driver free trains for the technically interested. Get off at Island Gardens and walk west along the water to Greenwich foot tunnel. An old tunnel under the Thames with elevators or stairs in both ...


8

Lisbon is known as the "City of the Seven hills". That means its kind of up and down a lot of the time. The most flat areas are near the river. I'm born and raised in Lisbon and it was until I went around with my own children that I realised some details that are worth sharing here. To compensate for these "down sides" I should say also that Portuguese are ...


7

In a nutshell, travel in Thailand is super-easy. Basically, in any place of interest to travellers, you will find both all the facilities you need and people who speak enough English to guide you to them. Outside the absolute peak of high season (basically Christmas/NY), you can always find a place to stay, and booking hotels online is very easy: ...


7

Kids that age are too large for car seats and probably don't need booster seats. Their parent should bring: books, handheld video games, smartphones, headsets, crossword or similar puzzle books that they enjoy (and plenty of pens/pencils/etc in case some get dropped or lost) snacks like granola bars or carrot sticks that they like paper towels/wetwipes ...


6

I am sure that the reunification visa is a permanent one, so it wouldn't make sense for the authorities to worried about you staying longer than you should. That wasn't the case with the student visa, so since this is a different visa you shouldn't worry.


5

Yes. It's possible, and safe (in terms of "Safety") but not always easy. The only challenge that you normally will have is that places are too busy. Since you are traveling in the high season with a larger group (2 people fit in almost anywhere anytime, a table for 8 will not always be getting a table). While summer is less of a risk than Chinese New Year ...


4

How long I need at the peace dome? It's just the ruin of a relatively small building to look at from the outside. The whole park, including the Sadako Sasaki memorial, takes an hour, tops. There's a museum that probably takes more time, but probably not a good place to take toddlers to. Is Miyajima a whole day trip With toddlers, it's at least a ...


4

I suppose I could have done this before posting, but maybe the answer here will be helpful to someone else. I called the consulate of Costa Rica in Houston, Tx and asked this question. Their answer was that "yes, they have to all have visas or else they would be illegal." I got a little chuckle out of the phrase, "they would be illegal", but there it is: ...


4

Spouse of EU national visa situation depends on a few things, but as a rule assume that you need a visa, if for no other reason than to prove that your are a legite couple. FIRST, if you marriage has been registered at your ambassy and dully validated by the EU national home country, then every provisions of EU treaties AND national legislation applies. If ...


4

From Sydney Airport's page: A family entering Australia can pool their individual allowances. For example: a family of 4 (2 adults and 2 children) are entitled to bring in: 4.5 litres of alcoholic beverages (2 x adults alcohol allowance of 2.25L= 4.5L) + 100 cigarettes (2 x adults tobacco allowance of 50 cigarettes = 100) + ...


4

I found YouTube the best preparation for flying with small children. Before I went on a plane with my kids for the first time, I started viewing a lot of "airplane" video's. We watched this landing in Madeira video over and over. It is where I learned that Airbus airplanes calls the pilots retards just before touching down ;). You should be cautious not ...


4

I guess that answer might depends on the country you are living in. I am in a similar situation as you are and I am not aware of any nationality related issue. What seems to be an issue is that many insures require you to be a resident (not a citizen) of the country they are in. I am for example a Dutch citizen living in Belgium, but I can't get Dutch ...


4

I don't see what the problem with the scenario is - I can buy travel insurance by simply telling an insurer that my family and I will be in Spain for two weeks, and that we won't be taking part in any risky sports (skydiving etc) They don't ask whether it is booked through a single travel agent or whether we are organising every bit separately. I am ...


4

The best country to visit when in a wheelchair is most likely the US. All public places have to be wheelchair-accessible, and nobody steals the designated parking spots. What you want to visit depends on what you like most. There aren't that many old cities, of course (though e.g. Boston and San Francisco are nice), but there are plenty of amazing museums, ...


3

As long at the marriage is valid your eu spouse will get a Schengen visa for free and in 15 days. If you look at the Schengen visa application form you will see that some section have a star ("*") this means eu family members will not have to fill those sections that include finances and your job details. And no medicial insurance or any thing else needed. ...


3

This may sound a little mean but if you're really concerned with them misbehaving or crying during the descent, one thing my mother used to is give us Dramamine. Granted she was frequently traveling with three of us under ten, and often by herself. And we all had a track record of being difficult travelers, particularly with respect to the ear pain during ...


3

Why didn't you read the directive? You would have found answers to your questions: "With a view to facilitating the free movement of family members who are not nationals of a Member State, those who have already obtained a residence card should be exempted from the requirement to obtain an entry visa ..." So, first of all the visa requirement is valid. ...


3

This website clearly states that "... spouses and dependents (unmarried children under the age of 21) of J-1 exchange visitors who accompany or later join the J-1 holder in the United States" must apply for J2 visa. Even if your wife applies later for a B2 tourist visa, she may have to provide your details in the application. The consular will be able to ...


2

You'll still be required to obtain an entry Visa for your wife, unless she obtains residency in your home country. Unfortunately, Europe basically won't recognize your marriage in that regard until she obtains her citizenship in France as your spouse. Are bank account statements really an issue? You just get one and go to the consulate in Indonesia. Here's ...


2

First, check whether you need a visa at all. You haven't indicated your nationality, so presumably you have found that you need a visa. According to Family visitor visa eligibility, an uncle is not one of the types of family members that would make you eligible for a family visa (it is generally only immediate family and direct ancestors or descendants). ...


2

Caveat: The Home Office has just published their report (dated Summer 2014) called Review of the Balance of Competences between the United Kingdom and the European Union Single Market: Free Movement of Persons which may (or may not) affect policy decisions impacting your question. Not immediately, but possibly in the foreseeable future. The UK is ...


2

If you never lived elsewhere in the EU, EU law has no bearing on the matter and regular UK law applies. Being married to a UK citizen is not enough to enter the country and your wife will need a visitor visa to enter the UK on a visit and a ‘family of settled person’ visa to move there. If you live in France and your wife has a carte de séjour “membre de la ...


1

On Akena hotels website ( http://www.hotels-akena.com/fr/carte-generale.html ) they claim that some of their hotels have some 4 person room. It is worth having a look ;)


1

Portuguese culture seems to be extremly fond of (small) children. We don't speak portugueese but we had the best discussions in Portuguese thanks to our children, who were 4 at the time. The two words I now know is "crianca" and "linda". Anyhow with small children I wouldn't so much focus on location, but more on family-run accommodation. Your best bet are ...



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