New answers tagged

1

Since you are asking this on Travel SE I assume you also would want to visit such an island. I think I have found exactly what you are looking for, with the only downside, that it is not a Pacific island but in Europe: Île du Levant According to Wikipedia some 90% of the island is military and thus off-limits but the rest can easily be visited. Being ...


1

Besides the antique cable cars, which are a protected National Monument, San Francisco runs historic streetcars on a daily basis. ("F" line.) Most are the PCC streetcars from the 1940s and 50s. Some are Peter Witt streetcars originally from Milan, which were built in 1928. There is one from Melbourne, Australia built in 1929.


3

They are DMU's with two axles used only by CFR (national rail company), built from 1935 to 1950, first refurbished in the 60s changed their motor from a Ganz of 130 hp to a Raba-Man of 180 hp, at the second main refurbishment from 2008 some of them got a new motor a Volvo Penta 226 hp, and a new paint scheme. More details (but in romanian) http://transport-...


5

In 1960, a round-trip from New York to London cost $350, according to a Pan Am advertisement. The same trip today, booked out-of-season, in economy class, with a layover and sufficiently in advance costs around $550, an increase of 60%. The official inflation rate was around 800% over the same time period, so it seems that the cheapest air fares have ...


5

You can be a part of a clean up project for $10,000 http://www.mnn.com/lifestyle/eco-tourism/stories/take-a-cruise-to-the-north-pacific-garbage-patch


5

They’re not exactly the oldest and they are not a subway but an S-train, but they still fulfil the remaining requirements somewhat, especially since they use third rail electrification: The S-Bahn in Berlin still has four historic EMUs that will operate for touristic reasons. Two are class ET 165 as seen in the image (taken from Wikipedia). They were ...


1

In Romania, Malaxa railbus class 77, built in the 30s, runs on different routes, with a low number of passagers.


10

Depending on your definition of the word "bridge", Hamburg definitely comes on top with 2496 bridges.


4

The Great Pacific Garbage Patch doesn't exist, not in the sense you are thinking. The name "garbage patch" may conjure up an image of a gigantic bouillabaisse of floating trash: empty soda bottles, soggy cast-off clothing, old pizza boxes. It's nothing of the kind. The "garbage" consists of tiny plastic particles, too small or almost too small to see, and ...


2

it moves around, so there's no fixed place to visit there's nothing to see. Not only are the bits and pieces small and mostly invisible against sea water, they're also mostly below the surface disaster tourism is generally discouraged in any civilised nation there's simply not enough (luckily) interest to organise tour boats (well, tour cruise liners, a ...


1

All hunter/gather tribes that is uncontacted is usually naked at first. It's not until shortly after they done the loincloths. On the island of Yap (Micronesia) you may find some people in regular clothing but the clothing of choice is loincloths. Wrap around types that provide more coverage then the amazon style. Besides exposing a lot of thigh is ...


7

The best option I've been able to find is Bar SixtyFive, on the 65th floor of Rockefeller Center: The highest outdoor terrace bar in New York City creates an elevated lounge experience 65 stories above the landmark Rockefeller Center. Bar SixtyFive at Rainbow Room offers playful bistro fare and curated cocktails in a polished vintage gem framed by awe-...


3

It has so far not been pointed out that at least in some countries you can not get married (or give notice of a marriage) if you do not have a certain special "marriage visa." This depends on the regulations of the country where you would want to marry (and you and your significant other's citizenships) so a general answer is out of scope but a prime ...


0

If you are a citizen of country A, and travel to country B, it would be up to country B whether they marry you or not, and up to country A (and any other country in the world) whether they recognise the marriage or not. I would first enquire with your local registry office (even if it isn't the one that you are a citizen of) - in many places, they will be ...


2

Some more practical considerations: It will take considerably longer to do a turn around (cleaning) of the airplane between flights. Seats on airplanes have to be certified against turbulence, safety, fire suppression and even floatation. Others mentioned that there is minimum requirements for evacuation of aircraft; but there are other considerations as ...


3

On the specific issue of meal service, the airlines could copy ancient Roman elite dining practices. See Why did Romans lie down on couches while dining? for a good illustration. Provide a pillow or headrest that can be raised at the head end of the bed. Add a fold-down tray table. The space for the fold-down tray table could turn into extra bed length for ...


3

Here is an update for 2016: Early on 3 March, Emirates flight 449 made history when it touched down in Dubai from Auckland. The Airbus A380 covered an estimated 9,000 miles between New Zealand’s largest city and the airline's hub, making it the current longest non-stop scheduled commercial flight by a distance. The Independent Here is what we can look ...


5

This isn't strictly a new answer (yet), but presents a dataset of antipodal airports someone might use to find a better route. Read on for the most antipodal airports and a shocking reveal about the Santiago-Xi'an route. Continuing this exploration, I turn to the work of an a3nm, who previously engaged in some airport antipode-related tomfoolery. Using his ...


12

So far... Santiago, Chile-Xi'an, China. 26h5m. The antipode of the Santiago airport is just east of Zhen'an, China, which is barely within 100km of the Xi'an airport. Fly this itinerary with just one convenient layover in CDG and you're there. I also like Aukland-Gibraltar (or Tangier or Malaga, though the flights seem fastest to GIB and their airport is ...


1

Definitely, no. Source: lots of own trips crossing it. That might be the case of ships though. But how many people is still crossing the Equator line in a ship? Not many.


25

I have been on flights a couple of times where the pilot made an announcement, but nothing more than that. Flying across the Equator in this day and age is a non-event, same as flying over the International Date Line or the Arctic Circle. While it might be cool to someone who doesn't travel much, it is not unique enough to warrant a celebration (especially ...



Top 50 recent answers are included