Tag Info

New answers tagged

-3

In Italy you can drive as fast has you can. (I used to live in Sicily) No one is going to chase you down for speeding, so there is no speed limit. But some roads have traffic cameras, which is annoying, but you can go to Auchan, which is a supermarket exactly like Walmart and buy a GPS and all GPS automatically have a radar to tell you were the traffic ...


6

No, it's simply done to make it more convenient, more "elegant" if you will. Just as they might, say, pull the stems from apples or polish apples. Some joints actually start to pull the banana skin down for you, to make it even easier! :)


2

There actually is a right answer to this. Surprised it's not here yet. Look at the airport this way: | (*) Departures Jet Bridge _|_ ________________________________________________ (*)/===\(*) ...


0

During the extreme weather events of 535–536, snow fell in China in the summer, see here:


3

In addition to the point mentioned about baggage generally flowing downhill (which definitely makes baggage collection on the ground floor / basement a good idea), and the tendency for for drivers waiting to pick up spending longer than drivers waiting to drop off, there is one other point that has not been mentioned. Passengers generally spend very little ...


1

Rain. When someone drops you off at an airport, you can go inside immediately. When you are being picked up, you usually have to stand around for a while. If departures were on the upper level, either they would have to build awnings or everyone would get wet and miserable. As it is, the people waiting for a ride are sheltered by the departure lanes ...


3

In addition to the reasons others have listed, an additional advantage to having the departures on top of the arrivals is that you can then add another floor for departures, if desired. As others have mentioned, departures is where most of the airport amenities will be on the airside. Thus, in order to add more space for amenities, many airports actually ...


5

I think the basic reason comes down to baggage and gravity. If you want gravity to help move the baggage forward, it makes sense to have the baggage check in at the top, the baggage claim at the bottom, and the loading dock at tarmac level somewhere in between. This not only saves energy in moving baggage along the conveyer belts, but also cuts down on ...


7

Note that these are just assumption based on observation. To add to the other answers: Good design can be born in many ways. Either by creation, but also by trial and error (or a mix of both). With airports people just realized that this setting works. Note that this setting (2 floors) is typical in large airports. A good reason for having 2 floors is ...


31

In addition to SpaceDog's answer, the main issue which forces airport designs to make arrivals at the lower level and departures at the higher level is land space due to vehicles. Cars, Taxis, busses, etc. when dropping people for departures they take much less time to do so, just drop and leave. Which means less space is required for that and upper levels ...


52

Warning, guesswork ahead -- I couldn't find anything definitive. Checked baggage is handled at ground level (i.e. that's where it comes out of the plane). Therefore it makes sense to have baggage claim on the same level to save the not inconsiderable energy it would require to move baggage up a floor (and then inconvenience people having to take it down ...


1

Since nobody has found a shorter distance, it seems that Namibia and Zimbabwe are the closest pair.



Top 50 recent answers are included