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1

I try to pay for each purchase using only the next larger denomination. That what I end up with plenty of change. Paying for a 1200 rupee hotel? Use 2x 1000 rupee notes. Paying for a 120 rupee taxi? Use a 500 rupee note. Paying for a 15 rupee bottle of water? Use a 20 rupee note.


4

In Japan, Japan Post Bank ATMs give 1,000 and 10,000 yen bills only. You can request arbitrary amounts of each, and the bills to be dispensed are displayed for confirmation before the transaction is complete. The easiest way to request 1,000 yen bills when withdrawing an amount which is a multiple of 10,000 is to use the 千 (1,000) button instead of or in ...


4

Small shops are usually reluctant to take large notes at the beginning of the day, because they start with a limited amount of cash to make the change. Once they've had a few customers, they usually have enough money in the cash register to accommodate you. So, if you have troubles paying a shop with a large note, you should simply try again later, ...


4

Some ATM's in Western Europe ask you what denomination you prefer. If that is not the case, I usually try to do some mental arithmetic and withdraw an amount which cannot easily be factored by whatever large denominations exist in the foreign country. Say, for example, you are in the Euro Zone and want to avoid €50 notes. You can withdraw an amount that ...


18

Some strategies: Take less out of the ATM. It may dispense different denominations and give you smaller notes if you only ask for a little money. This, of course, may backfire on you if you have to pay an ATM fee, since the fixed fee will add up to a higher percentage of the money taken out. But if you have a free ATM (or one where only a percentage-based ...


1

If you have a Bank of America ATM card you can use Westpac ATMs in Australia and New Zeeland for free. There is still foreign exchange fee, but it's a lot less than any alternative. Check with our US bank about Australian partner banks.



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