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38

I use five strategies to pay for things when I travel: The best rates are often the rates you get with your American credit card or debit card. Try to charge as much as you can. The fees are very low and the exchange rates are fair. However, many American banks charge several dollars for every foreign currency transaction, so if you plan to spend a lot of ...


21

Unless it is a significant amount, changing coins isn't worth it. The amounts are small and most banks and foreign exchanges won't accept coins generally. My solution is to collect the left over foreign coins until I fly on an airline that participates in the Change for Good program and then donate them. British Airways and Virgin also have their own ...


21

I believe you are mixing two pieces of advice. The best currencies are Euros, Canadian Dollars... This is because of the trade embargo against Cuba from the USA. This means US dollars are very expensive to exchange in Cuba, so other currencies should be used. Euros are often said to get the best exchange rate. This is not saying that vendors, hotels or ...


19

It is certainly not true that "most European countries take gold". You cannot pay for goods in a shop with gold. Nor can you walk into a high street bank with gold and walk out with currency - you would need to do it through a specialist dealer. There are places where you can sell gold jewellery, but you will get very poor prices.


17

This varies very much depending on your country of origin and your destination. Best exchange rate mean lowest spread, but keep in mind, that some banks apart of the spread, also charge extra commissions. Keeping that in mind, there are some general tendencies. Exchange rates, from best, to worst: electronic transactions (i.e. transactions made directly ...


17

There is no limit, if it's more than 10'000 USD however, you need to declare it: There is no limit on the amount of money that can be taken out of or brought into the United States. However, if a person or persons traveling together and filing a joint declaration (CBP Form 6059-B) have $10,000 or more in currency or negotiable monetary instruments, they ...


16

There is no limit to the amount of cash you can carry, however if you are carrying more than $10,000 USD (or equivalent in foreign currency) then you must declare it (full details on how to do that at the URL above). However bringing cash is very rarely the best strategy for foreign exchange. Although your credit or ATM cards might charge you a fee when ...


14

Thomas Exchange will change almost any currency into Sterling - including the Mongolian, Kazakhestan, Uzbekistan and Kyrgyzstan, Armenian and Georgian currencies, and many other obscure currencies and even pre-Euro currencies such as French Francs, Italian Lira, etc. We do not charge any additonal fees and our rates are always better than the Post Office, M ...


14

My normal advice is in this answer, which is to get a card without foreign exchange fees and take the cash out while you're over there. You'll generally get the best rate by far with this, and you don't have the safety issues of carrying round a week's worth of money in cash. If you are going to be somewhere without access to ATMs, so you need to take cash ...


14

I am not sure if you can open a bank account in France if you are not a resident. When I stayed in France for almost two years, it took me quite some time to open a bank account, even while working there. Finally I had the best service at the post office. What might be a solution is to use the gift card of the same post office. These gift cards are ...


13

Very, very easy. Any bank in NZ will happily exchange those for you, or indeed as you step off the plane, there are several currency exchange places at all the international airports. Be aware that the airports can sometimes offer worse rates than banks in town - but it depends how much you're exchanging of course, as to whether bothering with the effort ...


12

If you really want to change them, your best bets is to change the currency with people who go to the currency's country, either tourists or residents. Usually, I just keep the coins around and give them to friends when they go to somewhere I happen to have some coins from. Other than that? Just keep them as souvenirs, give them away, go visit the same ...


12

I have just been to two Exchange offices in Sofia, Bulgaria. I had banknotes from Serbia, Macedonia and Albania with me. They both offered to buy all three of them. This doesn't mean you find someone who does this in Finland but it proves that both Macedonian denar and Albanian lek are indeed convertible currencies. This is a sign from one of the ...


11

Although gold is at a high value now, it's not easy to convert into cash. A lot of places are doing "cash for gold" in shops for people to sell their old jewlery etc. However they pay maybe one tenth the price per troy ounce. I know this is the case in numerous European countries. So you'll have to buy it at 100%, and sell it at 10%, meaning a 90% drop in ...


11

Fist of all a short disclaimer: The blue market is an unofficial market not recognized by federal authorities and changing money there is illegal. Thousands of Argentinians use this market every day as buying dollars in the official market is almost prohibited by the government . I will try to answer your question without entering into the details of the ...


11

When you are departing from the UK and travelling to a non-EU country, you have to declare if you have €10000 or equivalent at UK customs (around $13000). Then on entry to the USA you will have to declare if you are carrying $10000 or more. Also make sure you have some documentation on you to show the 'source of your funds', bank statement, receipts etc... ...


10

There is no preferred currency per se for exchanging into INR in India, although US dollar, British pound, and the Euro are the most common exchange currencies. These are the three main currencies that most foreign exchange agencies support: for buying INR, it is usually not a problem as among these three currencies they will be happy to accept them. ...


10

I personally recommend just getting money out at your destination with an ATM. Quite often you can get debit cards or travel cards that let you pre-load from your home country, and then withdraw over there, fee free. However, I suspect they'll make their money other ways (ie worse rates). My tactic - on arrival, get cash out at the airport ATM or bus / ...


10

What you are talking about is this 100/50 USD bill: I have had this problem many times. If you end up with old USD bills older that series 2003-6 then it won't be accepted by most countries and money changers outside the United States. More frequently the problem I have noticed is with the bills with the front face photo to be smaller than the current ...


9

Every international airport I've visited has something like this: (This one was in Schiphol yesterday, but I've seen them everywhere.) It doesn't matter what country the coins are from or what country you're in. They'll sort them out and spend them to make the world better. Just gather up what you have and drop them off next time you see one.


9

It depends not on which country is your home but which country offers the best exchange rates. Since you have not listed either where you live or where you're planning to go we can't give you more specific advice. But here's some general advice. Usually the richer a country is, the more expensive money changing is. Developing countries often want major ...


9

Ok, Peter cleared up the more general doubt about exchangeability of the lek anywhere outside Albania. As to my original / more specific question: Is there any place in Helsinki where I can change those back into euros? Seems like no, not in Helsinki. A "Money Change" booth I stumbled upon in Kamppi Centre: no (raising a suspicious eyebrow at the ...


9

China has lifted most of the restrictions on trade in Chinese currency, so it has been possible to (legally) obtain renminbi outside China for a few years. When entering and leaving China, you are allowed to bring 20,000 CNY in local currency (appr. 3,200 USD) and 5,000 USD or equivalent in foreign currency (source: Chinese Customs). Assuming that you are ...


8

According to the girl at the reception here at a hostel in Skopje there is an Exchange office in the Ramstore mall, next to the museum of Skopje. There they do exchange RSD, however I have not tried this myself. Worth a try.


8

For large sums, rates for telegraphic transfer are usually way better than for cash, so you're almost certainly best off depositing the cash in a NZ bank and wiring it over to Canada. Of course, if you don't have a Canadian bank account yet, this gets a bit more complicated; you'd need to set up online banking and ensure that you can do a TT to Canada once ...


8

Although the official currency of Peru is sol, US dollars are widely accepted in many places. I found out three ways to exchange dollars into soles: In banks - the banks have the worst exchange rates and there were always lines. Besides, not all commercial bank exchange money. I don't recommend this. From street moneychangers - there are people in most ...


8

When I travel I usually just withdraw money from an ATM. Does that mean that in this case, I should be bringing lots of USD to exchange? Yes, it means exactly that. Does it have to be USD? Do they accept Australian dollars at all? You might be able to find someone who does, but it will be much harder and the exchange rate will not be as favorable. ...


8

The best product for these types of transactions are those cards which do not have international transaction fees - it usually won't matter which bank or scheme it is covered by. However, you should note that because you're not travelling to the USA, that some MasterCard cards first convert foreign transactions to USD then to the transaction currency. This ...


7

Did you try your bank? HSBC, for example, will convert any currency to your local currency if you are an account holder. The rates are quite good and they don't charge a fee. The downside is that they have minimum amounts for each currency type (usually around $50 here in the US) and they don't usually convert coins. Edit: Also, if one branch of a bank ...



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