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0

Yes you can. You'd be better off finding a bureau de change though. Bureaux de change will usually be able to do the card transaction in euros and as a general rule have better exchange rates than ATMs.


1

Is there a reason you cannot have your current smart phone unlocked? (Not owning one for example) It's certainly possible to buy unlocked phones in the UK, where your journey apparently starts. The costs are normally quite considerable for a smart phone, although there are some budget options. Carphone Warehouse would be the chain most likley to suit your ...


3

Yes, you can. Maestro Cards work with every ATM in Switzerland. The currency of the card doesn't matter. The fees depends on the issuing institute (bank). ATMs of the Swiss Post (the yellow ones) charge an extra fee.


3

I'm also planning my first trip to Europe towards the end of this summer. From what I've researched you can buy unlocked GSM phones in Europe (See this answer), but I wouldn't think that's the best way to approach this, after all, I've heard electronics are more expensive in Europe... If you're in the US, like me, you could just try to buy online cheap, ...


3

In my experience, travel insurance usually covers you until the date of your planned return home, or the actual date when you return home, whichever is later. This generally only applies if your delay is caused by something out of your control that is covered by your policy. So, if you fall ill on the last day of your trip and have to be taken to hospital, ...


0

I am not aware of any stats that would support that notion nor is there any rule that explicitly ties the amount of money you have to the visa you get. The consulate basically has two options when issuing a visa: Issue something that covers the trip you described on the application, with a bit of buffer in case something happens. That's the most likely ...


2

Having money is a great way to help get a tourist visa, but it doesn't necessary mean that more money will result in a longer validity -- or even get a visa at all. As an example, people are currently paying around EUR 9,000 and up to EUR 25,000 to get unlawfully trafficked into Europe, so if money were the sole factor they could show those funds as ...


0

This question has absolutely nothing with SE travel. There many online websites that can do that yet there are triple that amount of scammers. Genuine websites rarely do individual devices and most of the time you have to load your account with £50 or so. Like one of the comments suggested contacting your carrier is what you should first. Having said that ...


2

What a great question! I have given 'free walking tours' in London for a long time. Also in England (e.g., Yorkshire). Also in France. And from time-to-time I guide a 'free tour' on the Route Napoléon which involves either cars or motorcycles and lasts several days. They are all heavily oriented to history and/or literature. I have also guided free ...


5

You seem to be ignoring price, and refuting evidence of the price in your comments throughout here. While there may be $500 one-way tickets from NYC, NYC is on the tip of the US closest to Europe. There's no way you can reasonably assume all Americans would use NYC as their gateway to Europe, or could do so in a timely and cheap manner. Going from DFW -> ...


1

In most cities, you want to either spend a few hours or a week or two, and there's not much point doing anything in between. You can pick off the highlights in a few hours (except maybe in London and Paris), and it will take a week or two to get to know the place and properly relax into it. So if you want to visit more than one city on your holiday, you ...


5

I'm going to have to disagree with Calchas. I know a lot of people who engage in this mode of traveling, but I can't think of a single person whom I would say enjoys it. Others have given reasonably good explanations of the phenomena, but I'd like to point out an error the question-asker has made -- it's not just Americans and Asians visiting Europe that ...


2

But even people arranging their own "Europe trip" seem to repeat that pattern. Perhaps the answer to your question then, is that many people enjoy this mode of travelling. I have to say, there is almost a hint of snobbery in both the question and the answers. As though the only proper way "to experience" a place is to spend six months in it fully ...


7

I wanted to add an answer that does not contradict the others, but instead includes some personal reflections. When the younger crowd sets out to "DO" Europe, their 'peer status' rises in proportion to the number of places visited. It means, for example, that 4 or 5 hours in France counts as "DOING" France just as much as 4 or 5 days does. It gives the ...


9

First of all I have to say I totally agree with jpatokal answer. But on top of that I wanted to point out a flaw in the reasoning of your question; There are two possible reasons to go on a holiday: To relax, not being stressed To see stuff you never get the chance to see normally Now, for some people it makes sense to combine those things - like it ...


4

Some people just appreciate that type of travel, myself included, while I am not an American nor Asian and I have more than 30 days vacation annually. I would love to spend a 10 days vacation in visiting more cities, try a bit of that city and a bit of the other one. This gives me joy and happiness. Although I do not have tight schedules, I just do that as ...


2

I have seen the same happening with Europeans in Australia and New Zealand, with young Europeans on their first InterRail pass or long road trip. There is so much to discover and so little time to do it in. It takes time to learn to slow down and do only a few locations in a trekking holiday. Many people do one location holidays, which is all right for ...


20

I'd posit two reasons: limited time and not understanding the size of the continent. In both the US and Japan, the standard vacation time allotment is ten (10) days per year, which translates to two weeks. (And in Japan, if you're a salaryman, using all your allowance is considered near-treasonous towards your company.) Substract a week of that for ...


1

(disclaimer, I've just heard about them recently, and never used them as I prefer discover by myself) I would look at "greeters" : http://www.globalgreeternetwork.info/ Here is the France greeters' map: http://www.greeters.fr/?page_id=878&lang=en Max.


4

The whole point of invitations as they are used in Western Europe (and in particular in the EU or Schengen area) is to make sure you have a genuine purpose and someone who is willing and able to host you. They are not necessary for tourism or any other purpose than visiting a person you already know and hotels do not extend any (nor do they need to). That's ...


0

I have been used the TripIt.com. This website and app has some incredible tools. You can assign your email account for the service read the content of your emails and organize the map for you. At first moment is a little scary a external tool reading your emails. But this is really helpfull. After received the confirmations emails from the hotels, ...


0

This is a bit late for you, but there's a website now for your purpose. http://www.vamo.com can help you plan this multi city trip. You just add all the cities into the trip, it will try to find the best transportation for you (including flight/train/rental car/etc), so you don't have to do all the searches yourself. If you have specific ordering in mind, ...


11

While within one of the EU countries, you could travel by bus and train quite easily, even when crossing borders within the Schengen zone you might not run into trouble. But traveling from the UK to the Schengen zone you will have to show proof of permission to travel from your parents. I checked out the Eurostar rules, as it is the easiest way to travel ...


1

For traveling to Northern England/Scotland using the train provider "Virgin East Coast" there are no strict regulations for underage passengers traveling alone, (source: Minimum age for unaccompanied children). They instead state that travelers should be mature enough to understand the risks of train travel. In terms of tickets, when you reach 16 you might ...


2

In a nutshell, you don't need to buy anything (not even the ticket out of the Schengen area) but you need to credibly establish the purpose of your trip. And sometimes a reservation could help with that. See Does Schengen visa proof of transport requirement include travel inside Europe? for a discussion of the underlying logic in a somewhat different ...


19

There are many other landscapes in the Sahara, although I am not sure whether any of them really fits the bill. I suspect most of it is actually more arid than the American West (but you could perhaps find some similarity with the Death Valley). Here are a few suggestions (not that most of these places is easy to reach or can boast of any significant ...


3

I tend to just use rough estimations when I travel to the US. On a holiday, you rarely need the exact equivalent: 1l = 0.25 gallons 1m = 1 yard 100ml = 4 fluid ounces (same goes for grams to ounces) 1.5km = 1 mile 1kg = 2 pounds For temperature, subtract 30 from the Fahrenheit and divide by 2 - not 100% accurate, but it'll certainly help you dress ...


10

Something I haven't seen in the other answers: There's a conversion for prices you need to think about. Each state (and city) sets its own sales tax. The prices shown in a store do not include this tax. Tax rates can be as low as 0 or as high as 10%. gasoline prices shown do include the tax.


3

The only conversion that seems to me that you should really know is the currency conversion. Other than that: I am German and I lived a year in the USA and I went to High School there and if you'd asked me about how big a person who is 6 foot tall is in meters I'd now by instinct somehow know that this is rather big for a person and since big persons are ...


11

As a counterpoint to the other (useful) answers, I would like to invite you not to worry too much. The most useful units to master are probably miles (to plan your trip) and miles-per-hour (for speed limits). But you already know miles and road signs and your car's speedometer will both use mph anyway. So you can always relate the two without fully grasping ...


31

Important for car (if you rent one, it will automatically have mph, but it is still useful how fast you are going for e.g. braking distance): All values are rounded for convenience; the most frequent values are Speed 30 mph = 50 km/h 55 mph = 90 km/h 65 mph = 100 km/h Every car has cruise control. If you want to explore the USA by car, I recommend ...


7

US pints and gallons are about 80% the size of UK pints and gallons due to the US pint being 16 US fluid ounces and the UK pint being 20 UK fl. oz. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pint The about is because the US fl. oz. is about 4% larger than the UK fl.oz.


7

As a tourist in the USA, using hotels and restaurants, I needed inches, miles, temperatures in Fahrenheit and the odd liquid measurements like gallons and quarts. When doing supermarket shopping you can chose your containers and go be guessing. But if you want to be sure how much you buy, you should know all regular container sizes. If you are helped in a ...


2

Just got back from a month in England, France, Belgium, Netherlands. Texting worked perfectly; phone was fine at 20 cents/minute (though when wifi is available, Google voice is 1 cent per minute); the data at "2G" made me long for the old days with my dial-up modem (56k): typical speeds I got on the free international data roaming plan were 10 to 15k (not ...


1

Buy a U.S. to Milan ticket with departure whenever you next want to be in Milan and as long a stay as permitted by the fare rules (e.g., six months or one year). Then buy a Milan to U.S. ticket with departure for when you want to come home, and a return for when you next want to go to Milan. Repeat as desired. You are nesting tickets, which is permitted ...



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