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21

Specific to Paris (and vegetarian food) : There are many Indian restaurants next to Gare du Nord, on Rue du Faubourg Saint-Denis, which has a significant Tamil presence. Passage Brady has many Indian restaurants too. Quality can vary, but I specifically recommend two restaurants, Sangeetha and Saravana Bhavan, both Chennai-based south Indian vegetarian ...


15

I would feel comfortable sitting down at any piano that doesn't have a sign saying not to. Assuming they don't have music playing that you would be in competition with, and assuming that you're good and aren't going to play the same thing over and over, I would keep the following principle in mind: It's easier to ask forgiveness than permission. - Rear ...


15

Every piano I've ever seen has had a 'not for public use' (or equivalent) sign on it. If you find one that doesn't it's still polite to ask, but they're probably content with people playing it if they don't say otherwise. Or they just installed it this morning and haven't seen the problem yet ... If you can play the piano decently I really doubt anyone will ...


14

In big cities like that, you could probably find an Indian or a few Indian restaurants (if you know where they are), although I'm not sure about all of them. I suggest googling for Indian restaurants in these cities and look where they are, as they won't have one on every corner. Quality: don't expect it will (always) be the actual same food as in India ...


8

When I left the UK to live in germany I missed Indian food more than anything. These days it's easy: Google is your friend. There are Indian restaurants everywhere. If you check out Trip Advisor you will even get reviews, though they are sometimes suspect.


7

Taking rental cars across European borders is not particularly difficult. You do need to check with the agency exactly what they allow. Cars are typically approved in the whole EU and private insurance also covers many countries but rental agencies have additional restrictions (e.g. higher-end cars often cannot be taken to Eastern Europe) and might require ...


5

As said in the comments, ASK. Pianos are expensive instruments, having every punter sit down and bang at them isn't good for them as you no doubt know. I know the one in the lobby of the local hospital here is definitely NOT meant for visitors and patients to use, is reserved for organised performances (which happen several times a week). Of course it has ...


5

The main advantage of Thalys over Intercity trains is speed: 1h10 for a Thalys vs 2h10 for an Intercity on that route. And you have a reserved seat. Regarding ticketing, the point goes to the Intercity, as you say correctly. On the other hand, if you board the Intercity in Brussels you will be sure to have a seat. I have traveled several times on that ...


5

I've definitely eaten Indian food in Paris (was a few years back so don't remember exact location). Can't speak for the other places. But I'm sure it won't be like it is at home - they'll have adapted things to fit local tastes - it's sound business. If they only like spicy things they could try Moroccan or Turkish. But as they saying goes, when in ...


5

The longest European route is the E40. It has a length of over 5'300 miles and one can visit 13 European countries and there are even plans to build additional parts. The highway is interesting because it leads to a lot of frustration in Western Europe because of the daily traffic jams (especially around Brussels), but in the Eastern part of Europe, it is ...


5

You might already know this but it seems worth saying anyway... even though there is a European Union and money (neither covering all of Europe), the different countries in Europe have wildly different cultures. A striking example among others: there are public gardens in the middle of Berlin (Germany) where the Berliners sun-bathe topless... or nude. You ...


4

The first foreign language in all of Europe is English. In all tourist destinations you will find people speaking it, often enough of them that you might think everybody in the country can communicate in English. In a few months you will not have time to learn other languages, but try to learn the local version, for each of the languages, of 'good ...


4

Yes, you have to declare it. Here is the form. There is no ambiguity ("including gifts for someone else" or "will remain in the U.S." covers either situation of you being resident or not). I'm not a customs broker (so E&OE), but the harmonized tariff code for iPhones appears to be 8517.12.0050, which would appear to be free of duty. Your friend may ...


4

In addition to the kebabs, falafels, pizzas and US-style burger joints European cities have their own variants of cheap, available, mostly eat-on-your-feet food. These are not as healthy as the Asian counterparts, unfortunately. Netherlands: Patat (french fries), kroket (deep fried thing with pulverised meat), and other meaty products like frikandel, and ...


3

Ancient Roman Roads I would say that any of the ancient Roman roads would fit your criteria for being mythical. These used to cover most of Europe, and some of them are still usable to date, be it with or without motorised vehicles. If you need help picking one of them, I'd suggest the Appia Antica (Appian Way) which runs along a number of interesting ...


3

One option is the North Coast 500. It is a new route, being promoted as Scotland's answer to Route 66. It is 500 miles (800 km), starting from Inverness, and following the coast around the north highlands. It passes through impressive scenery, and plenty of places of historic interest, and other attractions. Most of the roads are fairly quiet, so are also ...


3

In general car hires in europe will let you cross country lines, at least within the EU (which unfortunatley Montenegro is not). However, you should confirm this with the hire company - either through reading policies on their website, or by asking them. You've got two issues to be concerned with - firstly whether the hire company's insurance applies once ...


3

Unless it's explicitly forbidden by a sign, I wouldn't see a good reason not to play. If you want to make sure, you can always ask. I've seen this kind of public pianos in hotels and in hospitals, and staff were always fine with people playing, at leats at daytime. My main rationale for assuming that the piano may be used (which hasn't been mentioned in any ...


2

if you have a US number, then US users should pay their normal text fee, while non-US users would have to pay whatever they would normally have to pay to text the US (I can't see anything on the AT&T passport or roaming pages about the cost for others to contact you. This supports the idea that the cost for others to contact you is the same as if you ...


2

The UK wasn't one of the destinations you mentioned, but I suspect the situation is similar. Firstly, most UK restaurants describing themselves as Indian are in fact Bangladeshi or Pakistani run. Secondly, the food you get served there is nothing like the food you get in India (or, as I've been told, Pakistan or Bangladesh). The main differences (to my ...


1

As you already pointed out - they don't know for sure if you left within 90 days. However, it is very unlikely going to give you any problems. As recommended by @Willeke, you could bring your former travel documents/itinerary along in case there are any questions. The 90 days period only applies within a 180 days time frame, which has long expired since ...


1

If you intend primarily to use you smartphone to chat, you could take a look at Chatsim. According to it's website: ChatSim connects all your ChatApps around the world. This way you can chat free of charge and without any limits with WhatsApp, Telegram, Facebook Messenger, WeChat, Viber, LINE, QQ and all other instant messaging Apps. With only € 10 ...


1

In Hungary you may build a fire/have a barbecue while respecting the general rules of campfires (stay far from the forest area, clean the land of dry stuff before lighting a fire, put it out when you leave etc.). During the year the state officialities may issue "fire restriction periods" which are made public on websites and radio (but unfortunately only in ...


1

In the Netherlands, NS, the national rail company, has been putting pianos in some of their busiest stations lately. They are always accompanied by a "Graag spelen mij" sign. I think it roughly translates to: please play me. On many occasions I have seen travellers sit down and play. And almost every time I notice a crowd gathering around the piano to ...


1

If it's anything like Australia: ask a taxi driver! We have many Indian taxi drivers here and they always know the best, cheapest Indian restaurants. I'm from the UK and I know the situation is the same there, but I'm not so sure about mainland Europe, sorry. I've travelled a lot, and it is definitely always possible to find Indian food. You want to avoid ...


1

Your question is to broad (where in USA? where in Europe? When?) but if you don't put any restrictions (anywhere in EU, anywhere in USA, in the next two month) these are some results: AGP-LAX 14th May: 218 € with Norwegian MAD-LAX 13th May: 210 € with Norwegian BGO-JFK 16th May: 136 € with Norwegian It makes clear that Norwegian is your best option. How ...


1

The Via Regia. The Way of St. James is the western part of the Via Regia which connects Eastern Europe with the West. This is one of the longest route you can have to visit Europe.


1

An other option might be Autoroute du soleil The route through France to the south coast, it even has a radio show made after it. The difference with route 66 is that it is still alive.


1

In 2015 no passenger oriented ferries operate to/from Israel, however some cargo companies will take passengers as well. Grimaldi certainly does, I am not sure whether anyone else does. It's significantly more expensive than flying to Israel.



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