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9

You will have to do research to find out which trains you can use without surcharges, but it is possible. It is still likely you will spend more money on the rail pass than you would on early booked point to point tickets, but if you are a rail buff and therefore are in the trains often you may have a good deal. The best thing to do is to read the right ...


8

Yes, but you may have less options and pay more: www.wikihow.com: Visit a Eurail Aid Office if you need help with your Eurail Pass, or if you arrive in Europe without having purchased a pass. Eurail Aid Offices are almost always located within large train stations; consult the list at //www.eurail.com/eurail-aid-offices to find one in your ...


8

The best way to find out whether you need a reservation on a certain train is to look up the train in a rail planner. I use the German planner for this, as it is easy to use and gives good information. Enter the cities you want to travel and adjust date and time of day, if traveling more than a few months from the time you check, just pick a random date but ...


5

On that route and train (ICE) reservation is optional and costs 4 EUR with the kind of pass you have: http://www.eurail.com/plan-your-trip/reservation-guide/reservation-fees/international-train-reservation-fees Here is infomation on how you can book it: http://www.eurail.com/plan-your-trip/guide-eurail-train-reservations/how-do-i-book-my-reservations


4

I am curious what answers will show up. My best possibility this far is the train Kharkiv-Uzhhorod. If I try to book that for next Tuesday (train 235O, leaving Kharkiv at at 10:31 and arriving in Uzhhorod the next day at 12:10) I get a price of 465 UAH, which corresponds to about €16. The distance according to Google Maps is slightly under 1300km, giving ...


4

From my experience, you can. I'm from New Zealand, and bought my 10 day Eurail pass in Luxembourg last year. I used it in Luxembourg, Germany and Poland, but could have used it in any of the other Eurail zone countries.


4

There is no direct train. You have to change in Warsaw or Poznan. However, via the webiste of the German Railways (bahn.de), it is possible to book a bus from Berlin to Krakow for 29 EUR. There are also other operatoirs on that route (e.g. Eurolines). The following thread may be relevant too What is the cheapest way of traveling from Berlin to Krakow?


4

Eurail Pass Explained In general the Eurail pass is valid on train lines only. Metropolitan public transport is usually not included in such rail-passes. The Man in Seat 61 says: Railpasses cover all the trains run by the main national train operator in each country covered by the pass, including local trains, suburban trains, regional trains, inter-...


4

In practice, once you are in, you can do (almost) what you want. Such details aren't recorded and you won't have to account for the change while you are in the Schengen area or upon exit. The main issue is the entry check. You need to have a plan that's credible and fits the visa you have. So showing up somewhere completely unexpected and not going to ...


4

More than I can explain you will find on the site of the Man in Seat Sixty-One. Eurail, as well as other rail passes in Europe, have passes for a selection of days in a longer period as well as passes that are valid over a period. And they have passes for a selection of countries (starting with just one) as well as passes for the whole of the network. You ...


3

The longest such cut-off I know about is for TGV Ouigo (IIRC tickets must be purchased at least 4 hours before departure) but I am not sure that those trains are covered by your pass. Otherwise, buying a ticket or changing a seat reservation is typically still possible even a few minutes before departure. But that's not what you should be concerned about, ...


3

How long is a piece of string? Popular trains at popular times fill up fast, less popular ones never do. There's some variation across Europe, but reservations generally open 3 months before departure. And if there are still seats available, it's generally safe to assume you can purchase reserved seats up to 1 hour before departure at the ticket counter, ...


3

There are no limits to the pass. You are allowed to take as many trips all across the EuRail countries. This is valid even for trains which require supplements or reservations. As long as you have the valid supplement or reservation, there is no limit to the pass on those trains as well. I spent 3 months with the pass traveling across most of Western Europe ...


3

Your whole trip is covered by the Eurail pass, but you should pay for reservations. If you go to the website for Eurail pass, there is a page specifically for international trains. For the Eurostar from London to Paris, you must reserve a seat. In 2nd class, it is worth 89 euros. On the page for night trains, it says that CityNightLine trains are ...


3

The Nantes–La Rochelle–Bordeaux line is an intercités line; intercités trains have no compulsory reservation. From Rennes to Nantes, you would take a TER (regional train), also without reservation. (Depending on the times, you might end up with a different mixture of TER and intercités, but my point is that this journey does not involve trains requiring a ...


3

I would advise against getting a Eurail pass. Eurail is nothing more than a travel agency, that has a product that is designed to appeal to persons unfamiliar with the European Railway System. WIth a Eurail Pass you will still have to make reservations, and pay reservation charges for the high speed trains you want to take in France. And you'll discover ...


2

If you plan in advance then a rail pass is hardly interesting. Moreover, if you are flexible, in the sense that you are willing to take a bus for one leg or another, you will save money by not buying a pass. Some time ago, when I was young and crisp, rail passes were really cool. At that time, nobody was talking about "low cost" airlines, bus lines were ...


2

The cheapest route I've taken was €18 from Ljubljana to Budapest which is 462km according to Google Maps. That comes to 0.0389 €/km. The trip took 8 hours, so I suspect the railroad was not exactly straight between the 2 points, although there were no stops other than a few minutes for border crossings.


2

The cheapest I've found is in northern Russia, from Воркута́/Вӧркута/Vorkuta (Komi Republic) – Коноша/Konosha (Arkhangelsk Oblast) , I find a ticket for a seat for 1399 RUB for 1559 km. That is €17.563, or 0.01127 €/km or 1.127 €¢/km. Further west, Göteborg – Narvik, booked early in the low season, I find tickets in a seat for SEK 562 (€60.13). The ...


1

Bari Italy to Rome €35, Rome to Milan €35, Milan to Paris €35, Paris to Brussels €28, Brussels to Amsterdam €45. All tickets were individual, seperate from each other. There was about a day or two of stopover at each place. Also, the tickets were booked well in advance. In the morning I will add the KMs from Google, and will add the price/km.


1

It is hard to advise for or against Railpasses, such as Eurail or Interrail. The Man in Seat 61 lists some arguments. Without knowing where you want to go, how flexible you want to be and how old you are, it is difficult to advise for or against. There is also a thread on this site: What is preferable, Eurail Pass or Buying Pass on the spot? In ...


1

Refer to the eurail site itself for all that information - see here for information on reservation on regional trains; in short: there's very little exceptions to the rule that regional trains don't require reservation. Here is a list (by country) of where reservation is needed or optional and what the cost would be. There's also a feature to avoid trains ...



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