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6

As far as the EU treaties are concerned, the referendum does not cause a Brexit. To cause a Brexit, the PM has to officially inform the other EU members that the UK is leaving. This notification may be several weeks or months in the future. The two-year period mentioned later starts at that point. With this notification, the official negotiations on the ...


2

Nothing will happen for at least the next two years; because that's how long it will take for the famous Article 50 to kick into effect. Even then, individual agreements/concessions may be negotiated by the UK with the EU regarding the freedom of movement. In short, no need to panic right now, but keep an eye in the next two years.


15

Changes that will directly affect British nationals... The British passport has "European Union" on the front cover. It will remain valid during the negotiations and a new design will most likely be phased in as existing passports expire; The European Health Insurance Card (Ehic) which enables British nationals to get emergency medical treatment, will ...


10

Nothing for quite some time. No law has changed. This was merely a non-binding referendum. Presumably the executive will agree with the people and Article 50 will be triggered by the PM, but even then, this is the first time it's ever happened so 1) it'll take a couple of years to sort out and 2) people aren't exactly sure how it'll happen. As a result -...


52

As of today, no. Nothing has currently changed (other than currency prices, which are of interest to international travelers). There will be a prolonged negotiating period over the next several years (specifically, two years after Article 50 is invoked unless a different agreement is reached), and immigration controls will inevitably be a large part of ...


8

No, there are no requirements for airlines within the EU to provide free drinking water. I know that it is both common and in some countries even required by law for bars and restaurants to serve tap water for free. If tap water is good enough, I guess that not even Ryanair would have charged you for drinking tap water aboard the plane, but it might not have ...


2

To avoid any problems, make sure you stay airside in Turkey otherwise you'll have to face Turkish customs and the UK will see you as arriving from a non-EU country. Is there a problem if I enter Turkey with more than 200 cigarettes ? If you enter Turkey, anything on top of the 200 cigarette limit is subject to a 57.6% duty1 rate2 and an 18% VAT and a ...


4

As much as you like It's your money, we don't care how much you bring with you: the more you bring, the more you can spend, we're fine with that. However there are two important things to note You must declare any amount over €10,000 (this applies to the UK as well as the EU, noting that the currency is still Euros when entering the UK! This would be the ...


2

I can't give financial advice or comment on the markets - for financial advice from people who know what they're talking about, try http://money.stackexchange.com and check what sort of currency speculation related questions they accept before posting - but in general if you need money to travel and the markets are unpredictable, you can reduce your risk by ...


4

According to a couple of experts interviewed by the UK Telegraph: Bill O’Neill, head of the UK investment office at UBS Wealth Management, said: Obviously relative growth rates are part of it, as that always drives the value of currency. But in Europe it’s a different world. We’re talking about the next potential move for UK interest rates ...


3

Travel Insurance is not a commodity, and can vary widely between companies. You'll usually be offered insurance at the same time as booking a holiday, but can arrange separately - here's what you need to check out; Is Your Destination Covered? It sounds obvious, but policies vary and if you don't know what you're looking for, they can be confusing. ...



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