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9

BA are good at rebooking especially from North America. If you need to travel today I would examine the alternatives, find some combination of flights you'd be happy with (without regard for the price) and then telephone BA with your preferences in hand. They should accommodate you for free, but you will waive your right to compensation if you agree to a ...


8

Yes, this case is covered under EU passenger rights, as British Airways is based in the EU: Secondly, you also have rights in case things go wrong. This concerns delays, cancellations and overbooking that prevent you from boarding and applies if you are: departing from any airport situated in the EU, or arriving in the EU with an EU carrier or ...


12

No. It's merely a reporting requirement, as an anti-money-laundering / drug-trade provision. You will be asked where and how you obtained the money. The country you are traveling to will likely also ask you to declare the cash, and may ask questions about it.


3

I have noticed that Travelex has advised... “No one can know for sure what will happen, however we want to ensure our customers are prepared for all possible scenarios and make contingency plans before they travel. As always, we recommend travellers take a combination of cards and cash. To avoid running out of cash, if there are shortages or ...


1

No, it's not valid for anything in Germany, except in two very specific cases: If you hold a residence permit as “family member of an EU citizen” (in which case you can visit Germany together with the EU citizen that sponsored you, but not work there). If you hold an EU blue card, in which case there are special disposition to work on a temporary basis in ...


1

All the rules regarding non-EU licences are still defined country-by-country. The main piece of EU legislation regarding driving licences is directive 2006/126/EC and it says absolutely nothing on equivalence or recognition of non-EU licences. In the case of France, the relevant rules are defined in Arrêté du 12 janvier 2012 fixant les conditions de ...


6

http://vosdroits.service-public.fr/particuliers/F1459.xhtml#N1008E According to this official site, for visitors staying 90 days or less, there is no requirement for the licensing jurisdiction to be the place where the driver resides. That may be an oversight, but still, if there's no such rule, it should be fine. You might want to double check with the ...


3

I'm not convinced there is a general rule for this that could be applied across all EU members, as different member countries have different rules and exemptions. The EU is not a collection of states in the same way that the US is. In your specific case I don't think she would be allowed to use her American license. From the French Licensing Guidelines if ...


3

Yes, your wife does need a Schengen visa (only one visa for both countries). The “Right of entry” is defined thusly in article 5 of the free movement directive (directive 2004/38/EC): Family members who are not nationals of a Member State shall only be required to have an entry visa in accordance with Regulation (EC) No 539/2001 or, where ...


2

Your wife needs to apply for a Schengen visa from a French or Spanish consulate (depending on your primary destination). However, the visa application is free and will be processed within 15 days If your non-EU family members need an entry visa, they should apply for one in advance from the consulate or embassy of the country they wish to travel to. If ...


-2

Member States shall grant your third country family members every facility to obtain the necessary visas. Such visas shall be issued free of charge as soon as possible and on the basis of an accelerated procedure. Member States may not require family or residence visas for your family members but only entry visas.(…) All the Member State consular officials ...


2

I am not sure why Relaxed writes that a 'visa de long séjour valant titre de séjour' is not applicable in this case, since it covers exactly the situation you describe. For stays longer than 90 days, the Schengen regulations define two possibilites: A national long-term visa (French: visa de long séjour valant titre de séjour) which in most cases must be ...


4

Yes, it is necessary. On a formal level, there is no gap in the law, more than 90 days is a long séjour for which third-country nationals need either a visa long-séjour valant titre de séjour (VLS-TS) or carte de séjour (or a carte de résident but that one is definitely not relevant here). As impractical as it is with all the delays and staffing problems in ...



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