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36

I use five strategies to pay for things when I travel: The best rates are often the rates you get with your American credit card or debit card. Try to charge as much as you can. The fees are very low and the exchange rates are fair. However, many American banks charge several dollars for every foreign currency transaction, so if you plan to spend a lot of ...


22

Since you are a citizen of the European Union you do not need a visa to travel to any other EU country. UK is not part of the Schengen Area, so you only need a passport (or national identity card) to cross the border and that's it. From Wikipedia: Individuals from the following countries can enter the Schengen Area, Bulgaria,[3] Cyprus,[4] and Romania[5] ...


12

I assure you, as a UK Citizen you're a member of the EU, and can travel anywhere in that area without restriction. Travelling to France is Easy - you can fly, train, or take the ferry, and as long as you have your passport with you, or national ID card, you'll be absolutely fine. Schengen is for people from other countries who may need a vetting process ...


11

The official Source of Truth(tm): http://europa.eu/youreurope/citizens/residence/worker-pensioner/non-eu-family-members/spouses-children-parents_en.htm In particular: http://europa.eu/youreurope/citizens/travel/entry-exit/non-eu-family/index_en.htm Your registered partner and extended family - siblings, cousins, aunts, uncles, and so on – can ask the ...


10

Further to earlier answers, the information given so far is bit vague and so might mislead. The EU spouse has very strong rights to travel freely within the whole of the EU (Schengen is irrelevant to this) with their spouse and children. These rights include the right for the Third Country national to live indefinitely and work in the member state ...


10

Not sure about mailboxes themselves, but post offices, yes. Geonames is free, and in its datasets of POIs, check out the list of feature codes, specifically: S.PO post office a public building in which mail is received, sorted and distributed Most post offices have mailboxes, so even if it doesn't cover every street corner mailbox, it's probably a ...


10

There are a lot of postboxes and post offices mapped in OpenStreetMap. Coverage and accuracy may vary, but I think it is generally pretty good for most of Western Europe. Considering just how many postboxes there are, and how spread out they can be in rural areas, there will be some missing from OSM. Depending on what sort of GPS device you are using, you ...


10

It does not appear that any US passenger airlines currently operate flights within the EU. I assumed that if any such flight existed, it would be with one of the big four legacy airlines (AA, UA, US, DL) and at least one end would be at a major hub. I checked the Wikipedia pages for LHR, CDG, FRA and AMS, and none of them show flights on those carriers to ...


9

If you hold a UK passport, then you hold a EU passport. You can legally live, work, travel and holiday in any other EU country for as long as you like, without requiring a visa. The UK (along with Ireland and some others) are not in Schengen (some countries are in Schengen but not the EU (like Norway)). Schengen is only to make things much easier at ...


9

As long as you stay within the Schengen area, you only need a single entry visa. Travelling between Spain and France is not counted as a new entry. You should perhaps be aware of a few pitfalls though. Andorra (on the border between Spain and France) is not part of the Schengen area. You are allowed to enter Andorra with a Schengen visa, but traveling back ...


8

I'd be fairly sure that common sense can answer this. Let's consider how sick you are. 1) Feel ill, but not sick enough that a doctor will claim you're SICK. So there's no actual evidence. A hotel is not going to keep you there for free, or everyone would claim this. 2) Ill enough that, say, you can't go to work, but don't need to go to hospital. A ...


8

A letter from the prescribing physician and paperwork from the issuing pharmacy should suffice for most countries. You could ask a border agent before departure from your home country to give you a note with some official stamps on it on their letterhead stating the medicines were legally obtained in the UK (plus number and nature of the pills, maybe), but I ...


8

[Disclaimer: my predictions of the behaviour of insurance companies are based on my experience with North American ones. I have no reason to believe European ones are different.] The word pothole has two meanings. The first is a small area of road a few inches lower than the rest, with sharp edges: This really shouldn't damage your car. If it does, any ...


8

Freedom of movement for workers is one of the fundamental building stones of the EU and EU citizens don't need to get prior authorization to work elsewhere in the EU. In practice, some countries used to (and perhaps still do) deliver some form of residence “permit” but unlike non-EU citizens, you are entitled to get one (i.e. formally the permit just ...


8

As an Indonesian Citizen transiting Germany when travelling between two non-Schengen countries you do not need a visa, presuming you are passing through one of the following airports : Cologne/Bonn (CGN), Frankfurt (FRA), Munich (MUC), Hamburg (HAM), or Dusseldorf (DUS). When traveling through these airports you will be able to "Transit Without Visa" ...


8

Being myself insured in the Netherlands, I am not 100% sure how it works for non-residents but the way health care is structured here is that there is no national health service but many independent providers and several private insurers. However, prices and insurance coverage are regulated. In practice, general practitioner (huisarts) consultations are ...


7

You really don't have a problem here. What you need to do is simple. But I'll explain why before A US citizen DOES NOT NEED A VISA for tourist or business visits to Schengen so Karlson's answer is partly wrong. You will be granted admission to the national territory of the Member State, AND to the Schengen 'area of freedom and security' simultaneously ...


7

As you say, Monaco is part of Schengen Area, which means there are no internal border controls between Monaco and its only neighbour (France). So you certainly do not need a visa. No one's even going to look at your passport. Quoting Wikipedia: Monaco has an open border with France. Schengen laws are administered as if it were a part of France [...] ...


7

The cheapest way to exchange money is to use a dedicate currency trading house. Your bank / credit card company will almost certainly charge you 2.5% on top of the exchange rate. I use XE Trade and pay half that. I've never had a single problem with XE regardless of the method I used to move money — Draft, Wire, ACH, bill payment through online ...


7

I can only answer this question for a small part of the countries you're interested in. Liechtenstein does not have its own rail service, so the Austrian respectively the Swiss rules apply here. Nevertheless there are some railway stations in Liechtenstein that are mainly served by Austrian trains. In all Austrian and Swiss trains it is strictly forbidden ...


7

Since your wife has a partner - you - from an EU/EEA/EFTA country (basically, any country that uses the Euro currency) she may be visa exempt under the following rule (data from CIBT): Applicants who hold a British blue coloured residency document "Residence Card of a family member of an EEA national" or a "Permanent Residence Card" with a validity of ...


6

I am not sure whether it is the cheapest, but Emirates currently has offers from many European cities to Delhi, Kolkata, Bangalore, Mumbai or Chennai for 550-600 Euros return. You have to change in Dubai. You can fly from Madrid to Delhi on February 24th for 464 Euros.


6

In Germany some long-distance or express trains have separate smoking compartments inside the train, and sections on the platforms where smoking is allowed - however nobody really cares where you smoke on the platform if there are ashtrays on top of the rubbish bins. You won't find many overland buses in Germany; there was a law passed in 1931 that would ...


6

You're unlikely to get a definitive answer to this question, since the exact internal visa criteria are not published. So take all advice you get with a grain of salt. So. Most countries do indeed treat multiple-entry status as an optional bonus of sorts: if you're borderline, instead of rejecting the application outright, you'll get a single entry ...


6

The rules will apply to the operating carrier. ie, the one that is actually flying the flight - not the one that you booked with. EU Compensation applies to EU airlines regardless of where the flight is to/from, AND to non-EU airlines for flights DEPARTING an EU member state. eg, a Lufthansa flight between the US and Frankfurt would be covered in either ...


6

There is a bit of confusion here because the rules are not simple: If you have a simple US visa or are returning from one, you can transit (airside) in a Schengen airport even if citizens from your country usually need to get an airport transit visa (with some limits regarding connection times and other details). That's article 3(5) (c) of the Schengen ...


5

There's an expiration date stamped on the visa, and that's when it expires. The issuer may decide to issue a single entry visa that will expire in two days or multiple entry visa that will expire in 10 years, and it will be clearly stated on the visa itself. If there are additional conditions, they will also be clearly annotated on the visa.


5

I went through automated border controls in Helsinki, Finland in Sep. 2012. I have a German passport including biometry data. I did not need any special registration. The procedure is as follows: The machine scans your passport. After that, you have to step inside and look into a camera. If the machine recognizes you, you are let through. That's it. As far ...


5

The important thing to do, is to know what flag your card belongs. What I realized in my trips was the ATM machines don't cares about the bank or country of your card. The flag is important. If the flag belongs to Visa or Mastercard, being assured that even most of ATM Machines will accept this. This is important also to discover if the bank that has ...



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