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16

Aas long as you leave a country with the same passport that you entered in on, then you're ok. So: Option 1: Entering Aus on Aus passport, leaving on Greek = bad Option 2: Entering on Greek, leaving on Aus = bad Option 3: Entering and leaving on Greek passport = good Option 4: Entering and leaving on Aus passport = good The reason being for counts and ...


14

Assuming you are an EU citizen, you are indeed allowed to exit the airport and be able to return without problems, as long as you have a valid boarding pass for your next flight. In fact, the Schiphol website suggests that you leave the airport and stroll around the city if you have more than four hours before your next flight. The recommended check-in time ...


13

Definitely you should use your Australian passport in Australia and Greek passport in Greece (because for these countries you are their citizen and they don't really care if you have a dual nationality). And as others have said it's safest to use the same passport to enter and exit the country. However, in many countries the police would not check your ...


12

Further to earlier answers, the information given so far is bit vague and so might mislead. The EU spouse has very strong rights to travel freely within the whole of the EU (Schengen is irrelevant to this) with their spouse and children. These rights include the right for the Third Country national to live indefinitely and work in the member state ...


12

The official Source of Truth(tm): http://europa.eu/youreurope/citizens/residence/worker-pensioner/non-eu-family-members/spouses-children-parents_en.htm In particular: http://europa.eu/youreurope/citizens/travel/entry-exit/non-eu-family/index_en.htm Your registered partner and extended family - siblings, cousins, aunts, uncles, and so on – can ask the ...


12

Yes, a visa is required for EU citizens. Fortunately, getting one is free and (usually) pretty quick. The easiest way is to apply for eVisitor online. The eVisitor allows visitors to travel to Australia for short term business or tourism purposes for up to three months. eVisitor applications are free and are available to passport holders from the ...


10

A few searches through this site will discover pairs of countries that don't like to see each other's stamps in your passport. If you plan things right, you can use separate passports to make this less of a worry for you. For example you might use one passport for Israel and the other for all the countries that might not like seeing an Israel stamp, or whose ...


9

I have never tried to get my visa extended in Indonesia. Take this is a disclaimer, then, for this what I know from a mix of personal experience and what I've heard from other travellers. A lot of fanfare was made in 2009-2010 when it was announced that VOAs would be made extendable. Technically, the visa-on-arrival is extendable for 30 days in addition to ...


9

As long as you have proof that you'll be exiting (a bus or plane ticket out of Canada), they should have no problem with you travelling on your EU passport. Visa and passport requirements: Visas are not required by nationals referred to in the chart for stays of up to six months, except the following: holders of passports endorsed 'British Subjects' ...


8

As you say, Monaco is part of Schengen Area, which means there are no internal border controls between Monaco and its only neighbour (France). So you certainly do not need a visa. No one's even going to look at your passport. Quoting Wikipedia: Monaco has an open border with France. Schengen laws are administered as if it were a part of France [...] ...


8

Are you sure that the first leg of your flight leaves you in international zone of Schipol? As far as I remember, you still are in European zone, where you can take the train to Amsterdam. International controls take place between the two flights.


8

Freedom of movement for workers is one of the fundamental building stones of the EU and EU citizens don't need to get prior authorization to work elsewhere in the EU. In practice, some countries used to (and perhaps still do) deliver some form of residence “permit” but unlike non-EU citizens, you are entitled to get one (i.e. formally the permit just ...


7

As long as you leave and enter on the same passport it is fine... for instance I have a South African and Swiss passport. Leave and enter SA on my SA passport and enter and leave Switzerland on my Swiss passport. No hassles! It does seem weird but for all the country cares you haven't left an airplane the whole time!


7

TL;DR Get the card no matter what if you are travelling for extended periods of time in EU. It doesn't cost anything and helps a great deal if an unfortunate situation occurs. If you can't present your card for some reason, you might have to pay ordinary rates (could be very costly!), but you can apply for reimbursement from your health authorities back ...


7

In some countries (though not in Europe), there is a tax (normally required to be paid in cash) on either entry or exit to the country. If you're in international transit, you'd be able to avoid that, but entering the landside of the airport and leaving would trigger it. That could be what you're thinking of? Secondly, there are various flight and airport ...


7

It depends on your citizenship. Generally, the official homepage states: Foreign nationals require a valid and accepted travel document to enter Switzerland. In addition, a visa is required in certain cases. Furthermore, sufficient funds must be available or procurable by legal means to cover the cost of living during the transit through or the ...


7

From Kate's first link: International marriage information: Couples from outside the United States can be married in Las Vegas. Most countries will want a certified copy of your marriage certificate and an Apostille from the Nevada Secretary of State. The marriage certificate costs $10 and the Apostille costs $20. The Nevada Secretary of State can send the ...


7

Yes, you can. When re-entering the US just make sure that they are aware that you have a visa and are entering using that rather than the VWP. (Now that there are no longer I94 forms when entering by air, it's worth mentioning this every time you pass through immigration - especially given that you likely also have an active ESTA) Presuming you are ...


7

EU citizens who travel to or live in a third country where their Member State of nationality does not have an embassy or consulate have the right to consular protection by the consular authorities of any other Member State. That Member State has to assist these unrepresented EU citizens under the same conditions as its own nationals. Source: ...


6

The visa requirements for Puerto Rico are exactly the same as for the USA (source). In other words, as an [Edit] ESTA-eligible citizen (most EU countries, but not all, see here), you ought to, in most circumstances, be able to use a visa waiver for a short term holiday by applying for an ESTA.


6

I have dual nationality (UK - Australia), and I always show both on departure. This stops them getting worried that they will have to deny me access to the flight because of visa issues. They should still only use one of them (the 'local' one) for their record keeping though. On arrival I just show the local one as that is less hassle for everyone.


6

Obtaining Bhutanese visa for citizens of other than India, Bangladesh and Maldives seems quite difficult. According to the official website of Tourism Council of Bhutan you will need to book a tour with a local licensed tour operator directly or through a foreign travel agent which will submit the visa request for you: Other than Indian, Bangladeshis and ...


6

My answer does not reflect official rules and laws, just my own experience. I visited over 80 countries and many of them officially require proof of onward travel, ten of them are in South America. The only time anybody ask me about onward travel was when checking in for a flight to New Zealand in Sydney. In some other cases I had return flights with the ...


6

As you are staying less than 3 months in North America, there will be no problem. When you enter the US the first time, you'll have to fill a small green paper, the I-94. This form should be given back when you leave the US, and it is a proof you actually left US territory. So you will not give it back when you go to Vancouver, but when you leave Seattle ...


6

There won't be any issue, just maybe a bit of a hassle. The Visa Waiver Program functions differently for air and land travel since the introduction of ESTA. Since you plan to do both, you will need to go through both procedures. Arriving by plane: At least two weeks before your journey go to the ESTA homepage and fill out the electronic form. Note that ...


6

According to the official EU website: In addition to their own valid passport or ID card, all children travelling: alone; or with adults who are not their legal guardian; or with only one parent may need an extra (official) document signed by their parents, second parent or legal guardian(s) authorising them to travel. You should first ...


5

Schiphol even advertises with the opportunity. They offer a so called Floating Dutchman, also for transfer passengers.


5

Puerto Rico is officially an unincorporated territory of the United States. For all due purpose, that mean that it's a part of the US at the federal government level, in much the same way that any other US state is. As a result, all immigration/visa/etc rules are exactly the same as if you were entering any other US state. All immigration is handled by ...



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