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31

No, you do not have any right to stop the person in front from reclining, and yes, it's childish behaviour on your part to try to stop them. Everybody on a plane has the right to recline their own seat, and flight attendants can and will enforce this if asked. You put "rest" in quotation marks, but maybe they really do need to recline: they might be sick, ...


18

Short answer, no -- not really. You could always take a change of clothes (or at least a different top) in your carry on and attempt to freshen up in the toilets. Take some wet wipes too. You could also try and find a shower in the city before heading to the airport. Depending what airport you're in there may be a way to pay for lounge / shower access -- ...


12

Yes, it is correct and fine to wipe your hand, face, neck with it, be it with hot or cold towels. You can see that pretty much everywhere in Asia. In Japan, you will be given one at hairdressers to specifically to wipe your face with it. Specially when it's hot and humid outside, a cold towel on your neck is something very nice!


12

Actual practice varies widely by country, but there are (at least) four reasons why hotels frown on having more guests in a room than you originally told them. Fire code. Hotels and rooms are rated for maximum occupancy: if they get busted for having two people in a room for one, or (worse) 101 guests in a hotel rated for 100, there are serious legal ...


12

There's good reason why we shower and use deodorant - it's difficult to hide that smell (plus you feel better after one). However, given that wasn't an option, there are a few key points. The smell is trapped mainly in certain areas on the body - key sweat points: (source) So if you want to reduce the smell, you want to target those areas. (Note, those ...


10

Sleep on your side. Sleeping on your stomach might also work. Avoid sleeping on your back at any rate. Sometimes if I sleep on my stomach I get circulation problems to various areas of my body that I don't seem to get any other time. This never happens when sleeping on my side however. Also keep an eye on yourself. If you notice at any point that you've ...


10

So, there are two mechanical solutions to, what is, fundamentally social problem, but before I provide them, I want to make clear that employing these is an easy way to be regarded as a jerk by your fellow passengers, and not without merit; the seat is designed to recline, and while putting it back can be inconsiderate, restricting the use of the feature by ...


10

So, if you're just joining them for dinner, you're NOT expected to bring a plate. However, even for a situation like that it's often expected to bring a wrapped gift for your hosts, so certainly if couchsurfing I'd consider bringing something. Ideally, gifts that can't be purchased in Japan would be a nice idea, and it'd be very special if from your home ...


10

You'll find that it varies from host to host, and this is often indicated on their profile. Some are excited to meet new people, but can't actually host - so they'll often just say they want to meet you in town for a coffee or similar. Others will have a bed and a spare room, and can be amazingly generous. However they do understand that you're ...


9

I always leave my luggage with the hotel during the day after I check out. Before the flight I then change my clothes and freshen up. Hotel lobby toilets are generally cleaner and more peaceful than other public washrooms. Then leave in good time for the airport. I sweat more when I am stressed so I avoid rushing to the airport. (Hotels are also a good ...


8

Well, I happen to be one of those people who sweat buckets, emphasis on the s. So much that I asked the doctor about it and there is not much to prevent this but a few things can go a long way. We sweat to cool down and remove toxins, so your goal is to stay cool and consume less sodium (AFAIK salt is the major toxin but I'm not a doctor). Staying Cool: ...


8

The first thing to know about Couchsurfing is that it is completely free. You are not required to "pay" for your stay offering a dinner, bringing a gift, etc. The only rule that applies is to behave politely. You are not even required to spend some time with your host, even though in some cases this could fall in the "unpolite behaviour". This said, the ...


8

The best thing would be to simply make sure that the kid does not need to spend money while there. If the kid comes back to his parents and states "I only spent 100 for a souvenir", this would be much better than you sending then the money in any other way. Possibly find a compromise that the kid can spend some things by himself, like inviting you all for ...


7

Lifehacker actually has a post about ways to find out which seats are actually non-reclining, so that you can try and book the seats behind them. A similar article of theirs shows the (meaner) option of blocking the seat with something like a water bottle. (from gawkerassets) There's the aforementioned Knee Defender, as well, but that's where you start ...


6

I am pretty sure there is no explicit convention on this and if there is it is not due to water use - water is not that expensive and showers are a relatively economic use of water (compared to baths or even just flushing the toilet). What's more a likely factor to offend people you live with is blocking the bathroom for a long time, or if hot water comes ...


5

No It really not rude and offensive in fact I have seen many chinese people doing it in the resturants well You may also see some people taking sip with the bowl not with the spoon. The problem with it is that when chinese people drink, they make noise like SHRRRRRR ! which is not good at all. But now as china's culture is also in evolution process so maybe ...


5

As with so many cultural things in any country, there are some big no-no's that you have to avoid 100%, but there are also a lot of grey areas. Due to China being a huge country and every part of it being in a different stage of development, socially, financially, industrially etc, it is normal that you will see all kinds of behavior. And people are in ...


5

So generally, no, there is almost no country that has an issue with particular clothing of any kind. HOWEVER, there are two major caveats: sports teams, and gangs. For example, wearing a La Boca soccer jersey at the La Plata stadium in Buenos Aires could see you in a bit of trouble. And wearing the wrong gang's colours in another gang's neighbourhood in ...


5

Sleep face down, on your stomach. As far as I know, snoring is more common when you sleep on your back. Sleeping face down, on your stomach, reduces snoring. It's pretty safe to do unless you have back pains, and make sure your pillow is a "low" one - not too fluffy and high because otherwise your neck will hurt a lot.


5

I just came across "The etiquette of seatbacks and elbow room" It nicely answers the OP. I would suggest to read the full blog, but the ettiquete is outlined as follows: Look Before You Lie Back Use Only What You Need Mealtime: Sit Up Straight For red-eye flights: " I say equip planes with a third light next to the "seatbelt" and "no smoking" ...


5

It really depends on the host. I try to help out with dishes and buy&prepare the food, or bring a postcard from your city and leave a nice note on the fridge before you leave. Some hosts expect you to hang out with them. I went to a bar with a local band playing in Vancouver i wouldn't have visited otherwise, and it was actually a nice evening. Other ...


5

In addition to the other answers, I would like to share some of my recent experience. In the subways of the large cities, one is of course expected to offer your seat to older people or pregnant women. In contrary to the Western subways I've been in, it is also expected that you offer your seat to small children. (This probably has something to do with the ...


4

My wife and I have hosted many people from many countries. We give them a nice bed, their own room, usually entertain them and, almost always, breakfast as well. We are experiencing an increasing number of guests who don't even make a gesture of thanks. When we joined we understood that there was supposed to be some kind of reciprocity. I always offer to ...


4

Believe it or not, those nasal strips with the tacky commercials actually work. Spend the couple of bucks, stick one on your nose, and you'll breathe better and snore less. Essentially, what they do is physically pull your nostrils open just a little bit wider, allowing you to breathe through your nose more easily, which prevents most snoring. Similarly, ...


4

What I usually do after a long flight is head straight for the restroom at the airport. Brush my teeth, put on some more deodorant, and maybe even change my shirt if I think I really smell. Then I go collect any checked luggage (if any) and head out into town. This usually makes me feel "fresh" enough until I get a chance to actually clean up at my ...


4

Yes, you can get rid of body odor using a waterless washcloth (+ change clothes). Don't try to cover it with perfumes or deodorants. They are moisturized sponges that require no rinsing or towel (it evaporates quite fast). It is mainly produced for those who cannot use a shower - like the disabled and elderly - and they leave your skin as clean as after a ...


4

I've often done similar things to the situation you describe in your question, but I've rarely ended up with the same problem you have. I think with a few small tweaks you might be able to get round it too... Firstly, if you're going to spend the day doing anything in a city before a flight, you'll probably want to shower and change. Doesn't seem to matter ...


4

Unfortunately there is no definitive answer that I could find on the subject. There are several blogs that say that it is OK to do this: Foodster China Pulse [China Highlights][4] And some that say NO: Asiania Personally that seems to be Ok in some western restaurants as well. Like Texas Roadhouse, where throwing Peanut Shells on the Floor is their ...


4

I'm Indonesian. To my knowledge, tipping is not common in Indonesia (no unwritten rules or the like). But yes, sometimes they expect a tip, especially when the guest (local or foreigner) is considered rich. Most Indonesians assume that people coming from developed countries are rich. Even when they are not, the currency exchange rate makes them rich in ...



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