Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

59

First time I've heard of this, and I think it's nonsense. There is a strong social convention that people should give up their seats (not just the designated priority seats) for elders, very young kids, the disabled/injured and pregnant. Nobody will be offended or think you rude for doing that. They might call you out if you don't. The recipient most likely ...


31

I live in Japan (Tokyo) and no one gives up their bus or train seats unless the standing person is clearly incapable of standing for long (old, injured, pregnant). Then they are fairly good about it. What's really entertaining is watching two elderly people with canes / walkers etc. arguing about which one of them need the seat more. And it's the "good" ...


21

I believe you are mixing two pieces of advice. The best currencies are Euros, Canadian Dollars... This is because of the trade embargo against Cuba from the USA. This means US dollars are very expensive to exchange in Cuba, so other currencies should be used. Euros are often said to get the best exchange rate. This is not saying that vendors, hotels or ...


18

Actual practice varies widely by country, but there are (at least) four reasons why hotels frown on having more guests in a room than you originally told them. Fire code. Hotels and rooms are rated for maximum occupancy: if they get busted for having two people in a room for one, or (worse) 101 guests in a hotel rated for 100, there are serious legal ...


12

Yes, it is correct and fine to wipe your hand, face, neck with it, be it with hot or cold towels. You can see that pretty much everywhere in Asia. In Japan, you will be given one at hairdressers to specifically to wipe your face with it. Specially when it's hot and humid outside, a cold towel on your neck is something very nice!


10

Your first point is almost universally true. Whilst there are a few onsen that allow swimming suits and the like, the vast majority do not. The only one I've experienced was in Kagoshima, and this was because it was a small but famous onsen; too small to segregate men and women and so Japanese yukata were permitted. As for your second point, yes, you ...


10

I give my seat pretty often in Tokyo. I can tell that it is never rude. On the contrary they are very grateful, so much that usually I prefer to keep a distance afterwards. Also sometimes they won't accept it to avoid bothering you, so I insists and say that I will get off soon anyway.


9

I'm Indonesian. To my knowledge, tipping is not common in Indonesia (no unwritten rules or the like). But yes, sometimes they expect a tip, especially when the guest (local or foreigner) is considered rich. Most Indonesians assume that people coming from developed countries are rich. Even when they are not, the currency exchange rate makes them rich in ...


8

TL;DR: You shouldn't. Taiwan is nowhere near as "bow-heavy" as Japan, but the same rule applies: foreigners are not expected to know or understand how to bow, and that's fine. Anybody meeting or being introduced to you is going to shake hands Western style. If you see people bowing at temples, funerals, whatever, what they're doing is none of your ...


8

No, I do it regularly. There are even spaces on trains and busses that are marked for the elderly, pregnant, disabled, etc. where the able-bodied may sit but are to give up their seat if anyone in greater need of it shows up. It is not uncommon that the person you are giving the seat up to may initially refuse your kindness because it is polite to be slow ...


8

I live in Japan and every day commute with trains and metro. And can assure you that nobody will think you are rude by offering the seat. From my personal experience: I have a rule to always give up my seat to Disabled/injured people Pregnant women (in Japan they wear a badge like this ...


7

To me the 'simplest' solution would be to welcome them to the city, and say you're happy to host, but that you're busy and can really only take people for a couple of days. Ask them which days suit them the best. It's up to them whether or not that works. They may find something more suitable, or they'll be happy to meet you, and then move on, perhaps to ...


7

In addition to codinghands's great answer I would like to add a few pointers: Make sure the onsen provides a large and small towel for visitors or bring your own While you can't wear any clothing in the bath, you can cover up with a small towel When in Rome, do as the Romans Towels Depending on the onsen, towels (a smaller washcloth, and a larger towel ...


7

If you have the Japanese skills, use them. English won't get you very far outside of tourist areas and very basic interactions - if you've got the ability to clarify yourself after saying something, even if it is in a roundabout way, you're going to have a much easier time. Sounding weird is par for the course unless you're totally fluent, so I wouldn't ...


5

Nowadays, overtly “giving up one’s seat” risks abuse almost everywhere. So, don’t do so, and not just in Japan. Instead just get up and walk away, if you can, otherwise just stand up. There is no need for “really this is my seat but I am prepared to let you have it”.


5

Just FWIW I'd say for (1) yes it's perfectly OK to put the money in the folder, and just get up and leave. you're the heavily paying customer, you've paid and you're done. at a cafe that would be normal. maybe the staff will wave bye-bye to you. at a nice restaurant, the staff SHOULD come and fuss over you as you leave! for (2) inside the book, just so ...


5

My wife and I have hosted many people from many countries. We give them a nice bed, their own room, usually entertain them and, almost always, breakfast as well. We are experiencing an increasing number of guests who don't even make a gesture of thanks. When we joined we understood that there was supposed to be some kind of reciprocity. I always offer to ...


5

I think more of it has to do with appearance than any sort of profundity everyone seems so fond of blaming. Japan is a HIGHLY image-conscious society, for better or worse, and stuffing your face while on the move isn't a good look, anywhere. In regard to Japan having this religious respect for food, I don't think anyone who's been to a proper nomikai at ...


5

No It really not rude and offensive in fact I have seen many chinese people doing it in the resturants well You may also see some people taking sip with the bowl not with the spoon. The problem with it is that when chinese people drink, they make noise like SHRRRRRR ! which is not good at all. But now as china's culture is also in evolution process so maybe ...


5

As with so many cultural things in any country, there are some big no-no's that you have to avoid 100%, but there are also a lot of grey areas. Due to China being a huge country and every part of it being in a different stage of development, socially, financially, industrially etc, it is normal that you will see all kinds of behavior. And people are in ...


4

Unfortunately there is no definitive answer that I could find on the subject. There are several blogs that say that it is OK to do this: Foodster China Pulse [China Highlights][4] And some that say NO: Asiania Personally that seems to be Ok in some western restaurants as well. Like Texas Roadhouse, where throwing Peanut Shells on the Floor is their ...


4

Based on my experiences and conversations in Bali so far (specifically: Ubud, Denpasar, Sanur), it appears that tipping works something like this: Restaurants You're generally not expected to tip, but there are exceptions: At some restaurants, a 5% "service fee" will be added to your bill. As printemps noted, you will encounter a sort of "share the ...


4

I don't speak any Japanese but I would approach them in Japanese if you can, and if necessary ask them to speak more slowly / clearly and tell them that you are not native. No reason to put on a foreign accent! Choice of words and different grammar will make them realize that you aren't native soon enough. Do Japanese people tend to be embarrassed if ...


4

I don't think there is a single correct way to do this. Leaving cultural difference aside, and drawing from personal experience (as a guest, not as a waiter), I would say you can either of the things you mentioned, the waiters will act accordingly. If you have exactly the amount you want/have to pay (including cash), you can either put the money on the ...


3

I traveled Sumatra and Java for months and I NEVER was asked any tip. The thing is that I speak some Indonesian, so they know that I won't buy the "you are supposed to tip" line. That said, I've never been in Bali and they may have a very different culture about tipping. Some bad habit taught by occidentals ;-) In the end, I tip only those people who sell ...


3

There's a useful breakdown for tipping in different scenarios at this web site (whototip.net). I can't vouch for the accuracy of this information (not sure where the web developer got his info) but it appears to be pretty thorough.


3

A few years ago I wrote up a comprehensive guide on going to and getting in onsens for my local website (I love onsens, and have lived in Japan for 8 years). The above answer is correct, however if you'd like more details as well as a start-to-finish getting-in-the-onsen guide, feel free to check out the "Onsen Experience" section at the following link. ...


3

I'm much taller than average and in some airplines it's already tight without reclined chairs in front of me. Thus on most flights I keep my legs in a normal position, which already makes it very difficult for the person in front of me to recline their seat. This is enough for most cases. But not all. Communication is usually the best way out of this. ...


2

One thing to do is to ask for a new seat. Some airplanes may have a few "extras," and give you some choice of seats. Even if there are no "new seats," the fact that you asked puts the airline on notice that there is a problem. If they're at all on the ball, the cabin crew will talk to the other passenger and try to work out something between the two of you. ...


2

British Airways was asked (admittedly a while back), and while they don't ban it, they did say it was: "not something we would actively encourage" (source) I haven't seen a more recent source yet :/



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible