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60

First time I've heard of this, and I think it's nonsense. There is a strong social convention that people should give up their seats (not just the designated priority seats) for elders, very young kids, the disabled/injured and pregnant. Nobody will be offended or think you rude for doing that. They might call you out if you don't. The recipient most likely ...


35

I live in Japan (Tokyo) and no one gives up their bus or train seats unless the standing person is clearly incapable of standing for long (old, injured, pregnant). Then they are fairly good about it. What's really entertaining is watching two elderly people with canes / walkers etc. arguing about which one of them need the seat more. And it's the "good" ...


35

No it is not rude. I've lived in London most of my life and travelled in hundreds of black cabs and can assure you that cabbies really do not care what you get up to in the back of the cab -- as long as you pay the fare, give them a decent tip and don't spill food/drink/bodily fluid.


33

I've been in a similar situation many times when travelling during business hours to/from meetings - or, often, when going to the airport - where I've had to jump in on conference calls where I knew it would be for the duration of the ride. I usually excuse myself before the call, letting them know that I'm going to be on a call (even if I'm not talking). ...


28

So, you should prepay for however much gas you intend to buy. In most cases, you'll probably want to either fill the gas tank, or just buy an amount of gas that corresponds to a nice round dollar amount like 20 dollars, to make the transaction quick and easy. If you want to top off the tank, just prepay for an amount that you know exceeds the amount ...


22

I believe you are mixing two pieces of advice. The best currencies are Euros, Canadian Dollars... This is because of the trade embargo against Cuba from the USA. This means US dollars are very expensive to exchange in Cuba, so other currencies should be used. Euros are often said to get the best exchange rate. This is not saying that vendors, hotels or ...


19

Why not use a credit card and ask for a full tank? That's what I do. If you want to pre-pay in cash, it's ok to pay more than you need and get the change back. Cars usually have gas tanks that are 10-20 gallons in size. So if it is half full, estimate 10 gallons and pay for 10 x $currentpriceingallons. So if it is $3 per gallon, prepay $30 (or $40 to be ...


19

My intuition as a Londoner was that this was absolutely fine, but then I had a moment of self-doubt and worried that maybe I'd been being rude in not talking much to cabbies all these years. So I sought out this ethnographic study of cab drivers: Inside the Mind of a Cabbie (RSA) and that has confirmed my impression that the time and space are basically ...


16

I live in Japan and every day commute with trains and metro. And can assure you that nobody will think you are rude by offering the seat. From my personal experience: I have a rule to always give up my seat to Disabled/injured people Pregnant women (in Japan they wear a badge like this ...


15

In my opinion Airbnb is nothing but a short-let provider. Yes people do rent out their spare rooms, and thus welcome you in their house. But they do so in exchange for money, very much like a hotel, or a bed-and-breakfast, would do. In that sense I don't think tipping is necessary. If you want to show appreciation to an excellent host, the best way to do ...


15

Every piano I've ever seen has had a 'not for public use' (or equivalent) sign on it. If you find one that doesn't it's still polite to ask, but they're probably content with people playing it if they don't say otherwise. Or they just installed it this morning and haven't seen the problem yet ... If you can play the piano decently I really doubt anyone will ...


15

I would feel comfortable sitting down at any piano that doesn't have a sign saying not to. Assuming they don't have music playing that you would be in competition with, and assuming that you're good and aren't going to play the same thing over and over, I would keep the following principle in mind: It's easier to ask forgiveness than permission. - Rear ...


11

I give my seat pretty often in Tokyo. I can tell that it is never rude. On the contrary they are very grateful, so much that usually I prefer to keep a distance afterwards. Also sometimes they won't accept it to avoid bothering you, so I insists and say that I will get off soon anyway.


10

You should pay enough cash to cover for the quantity of fuel you want to buy. In case you prepaid more than needed you should have no problem getting your change back from the cashier. On the other hand should you have prepaid less than needed, when refueling the machine should cut you off as soon as the prepaid amount is reached. You can always prepay a bit ...


9

No, I do it regularly. There are even spaces on trains and busses that are marked for the elderly, pregnant, disabled, etc. where the able-bodied may sit but are to give up their seat if anyone in greater need of it shows up. It is not uncommon that the person you are giving the seat up to may initially refuse your kindness because it is polite to be slow ...


8

Yes, it is acceptable. However, it is etiquette that if the baby does start to make noise that you take it to the "deck" area beyond the doors (where the bathrooms, telephone, vending machines, etc.) are. This is the same protocol if you have to make or receive a telephone call, want to have a loud conversation with your seatmate, or do anything that might ...


7

Americans used to be able to pay after filling the fuel tank, but too many people just drove away without paying (they stole from the gas station). Most MAJOR brand gas stations (Exxon, Mobil, Sunoco, Shell, Texaco) do NOT charge more to use a credit card, but you need to check before using your credit card. Usually the sign will say "Cash" under the price ...


6

It's not a requirement to tip taxi drivers in the UK. However, it's generally accepted as the 'done thing'. Note however there are different taxis - the famous 'black cabs', that have official rates, and other unlicensed minicabs where you'll need to organise a rate before you start driving. Source - used to live in London, and tripadvisor.


5

Nowadays, overtly “giving up one’s seat” risks abuse almost everywhere. So, don’t do so, and not just in Japan. Instead just get up and walk away, if you can, otherwise just stand up. There is no need for “really this is my seat but I am prepared to let you have it”.


5

For daily greeting, it's great to wave hands and smile to others. Also, you can shake hands if it's the first time to meet people in Taiwan. We don't bow to others, even if you're in temple. However, try being yourself in Taiwan. It's great to feel as you're at home. :)


5

I'm afraid my answer will be nothing more than anecdotal. My source is that I lived in London for a while. The bottom line is that no tip is required. However some people do tip, as it often happens in these cases, be it for habit, or because they feel they have to. Minicabs With minicabs (in London) I always agreed the fare in advance, and made sure the ...


5

Just FWIW I'd say for (1) yes it's perfectly OK to put the money in the folder, and just get up and leave. you're the heavily paying customer, you've paid and you're done. at a cafe that would be normal. maybe the staff will wave bye-bye to you. at a nice restaurant, the staff SHOULD come and fuss over you as you leave! for (2) inside the book, just so ...


5

I don't think there is a specific etiquette to follow. Common sense and good parenting though are key to insure a pleasant stay for both you and othe guests. Of course this is true for all travelling situations, regardless of location or accommodation type. Having said this, internet kinda shows that several families with babies have successfully and ...


5

As said in the comments, ASK. Pianos are expensive instruments, having every punter sit down and bang at them isn't good for them as you no doubt know. I know the one in the lobby of the local hospital here is definitely NOT meant for visitors and patients to use, is reserved for organised performances (which happen several times a week). Of course it has ...


4

I don't think there is a single correct way to do this. Leaving cultural difference aside, and drawing from personal experience (as a guest, not as a waiter), I would say you can either of the things you mentioned, the waiters will act accordingly. If you have exactly the amount you want/have to pay (including cash), you can either put the money on the ...


4

AFAIK in the US it is illegal to charge a different price for gas depending on payment method. So the only fees you will incur in paying by credit card is whatever the issuing bank tacks on to the current exchange rate - which is often a better rate than you get exchanging cash for USD in the first place. So just pump a full tank and pay by credit card, and ...


3

That is most likely true in most situations. However, the general idea is to give up your seat to someone else that may need it more than you such has pregnant women and older people. Also, there are certain sections in the train that are reserved for those people. If the train is too crowded then you may face a situation where those people cannot get to ...


3

Fastidiousness. Being considerate to others. As with many cultural peculiarities/quirks/anomalies, there is usually not one single explanation. But IMHO the single biggest explanation is a combination of being fastidious and considerate to others. To walk while one eats or drinks is to elevate the risk of food/drink spillage. And doing any such thing would ...


3

I'm much taller than average and in some airplines it's already tight without reclined chairs in front of me. Thus on most flights I keep my legs in a normal position, which already makes it very difficult for the person in front of me to recline their seat. This is enough for most cases. But not all. Communication is usually the best way out of this. ...


3

Unless it's explicitly forbidden by a sign, I wouldn't see a good reason not to play. If you want to make sure, you can always ask. I've seen this kind of public pianos in hotels and in hospitals, and staff were always fine with people playing, at leats at daytime. My main rationale for assuming that the piano may be used (which hasn't been mentioned in any ...



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