Hot answers tagged

43

The best source I can find is this picture gallery of the local newspaper (Süddeutsche Zeitung, in German). My advice is based on that, own experience and other sources where mentioned: You can bring your own food. (Within some limits, see below. Unless it is a "Wirtsgarten".) In case you bring food, you might want to think of napkins, cutlery, tablecloth, ...


33

I stay in quite a lot of hotels (more than I realised when I added up the nights last year!), many of which have pools. All I can say in general is... There is no general rule! So, what I do first is to grab the guest information directory thingy in the room (normally a binder or little booklet), and check in there under leisure or facilities or spa. Around ...


28

Do you need to be religious active to walk to Santiago or do any other traditional pilgrimage? Most people I have heard of who have completed a large part of the Santiago route by walking or cycling were not religiously active; and even those who were practicing Roman Catholics (RC) have never made another pilgrimage. So you will not be an exception, ...


18

Recycle the card however you wish. Those things are ephemeral and can't be used anyway after you check out1 and the hotel probably buys them in bulk. 1. And by "can't be used" I mean that your checkout date is encoded onto the card key and the room locks will reject any attempt to open the door past an expired checkout date in the same manner that you can'...


17

My brother, sister and I walked the camino de compostela in 2013 - we are all non religious. Everything is quite organized and we had no problems finding places to sleep/eat. Depending on where you are planning to stay, it can happen that the hostel belongs or is part of the church (albergue parroquial). One time we were asked if we could attend/say a few ...


13

The greeting which you included is the "Namaste" (you are right!). This is a very formal greeting, which is shown towards guests and elders. The greeting which you haven't included, looks more like a vertical salute. [Couldn't find a picture. Maybe, I'd include one of my guard if I can click it.] It is more like an informal namaste(and conveys the same ...


12

You are probably witnessing the adaab hand gesture. This is a secular greeting used in India, Pakistan and other countries where Urdu is spoken. Here are two people demonstrating the gesture. The lady is doing the namaste and the man is responding with the adaab (credit: aaghazedosti.wordpress.com): The hand is raised higher to the face in a more formal ...


12

To answer your questions : Do I get changed into pool clothes in my room and go to the pool in the hotel bathrobe? Or can I expect changing facilities there and am expected to use those? It all depends of the hotel. I would say that generally speaking, it isn't an issue to go to the pool with the bathrobe but you might find yourself in an ...


10

Other businesses use such cards for employee access and I have known some impose quite hefty charges to replace lost cards (say $20). However this may be more to discourage the security breaches and administration involved than to cover the cost of the card alone, which for bank cards is under a couple of dollars (and bank cards are likely more expensive ...


10

Does the gesture he made look similar to the one in the photo below, but without the other hand raised and the mouth open? If yes, then it is sort of an informal Namasthe practiced among the town folk and some city folk who migrated from the towns or villages. It is polite and indicates that the person doing it is humble. You will rarely find a man of ...


7

It is most common to don your bathing attire in your room then cover up on the walk from the room to the pool area. For men, this can be just a shirt/t-shirt if the swim suite is trunks or boardshorts. If you're wearing a Speedo, cover that with shorts as well. Women would normally wear a Sundress or Sarong. I would not expect Lockers at a 5-Star Resort. ...


7

I think that there are 2 basic approaches to a pilgrimage which have served people for centuries. It's a holiday. For this to work you need to be properly dressed and equipped (enough sunscreen!) and expecting to enjoy yourself. As with any holiday you need to respect "the locals" which in your case means not only respecting the Spanish, but also the ...


5

Hotel keys are coded for the length of your stay, they will usually expire around check-out time on the last day of your stay. Some hotels will ask you to return them because even keys which no longer open a particular room may still be used to access other key-card secure areas like the pool, business center, or gym. Basically though, the hotel buys keys ...


3

I have had one experience where we got changed in our rooms and went to the spa in robes and slippers. On the way back the only way to the room is to go through the bar area which was now in full swing with a wedding party - very embarrassing :)


2

Agree with what Sundeep says. Here is my 10 cents to it. Normal Hi Across the world, people say hi by raising their hands with palm facing you. This is mostly between acquaintances and friends. So no respect factor is involved in this. It is more of a friendly gesture. Namsthe Formal and traditional Indian way of welcoming somebody to a new place, ...


2

10% is normal here in London. It is polite to tip 10-15% of the taxi fare for black cabs and licensed minicabs in London. However, most people simply round up the fare to the nearest £1 and tell the driver to "keep the change". If you've had a longer journey and the driver has assisted you with luggage, you may wish to tip a little more, up to £5. ...



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