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61

Since the issue is not only with food that you can spill but also with drinking from bottles or cans (even if you buy it from a vending machine, you are not supposed to drink it while you walk), which are not as easy to spill as walking around with a ramen bowl, this is not a hygiene issue. The topic is much more about the respect for food at large. When ...


60

First time I've heard of this, and I think it's nonsense. There is a strong social convention that people should give up their seats (not just the designated priority seats) for elders, very young kids, the disabled/injured and pregnant. Nobody will be offended or think you rude for doing that. They might call you out if you don't. The recipient most likely ...


57

Take name cards with two hands when given to you, give them with two hands. Look at the received card, put it in front of you on the table while you are talking to the person(s). You CAN punch with one chopstick into food and hold it with the other if it's something hard to eat (dumplings, potatoes etc). Don't stick both in however. Do not soak your sushi ...


51

No, you do not have any right to stop the person in front from reclining, and yes, it's childish behaviour on your part to try to stop them. Everybody on a plane has the right to recline their own seat, and flight attendants can and will enforce this if asked. You put "rest" in quotation marks, but maybe they really do need to recline: they might be sick, ...


35

Funnily enough, I read an article on askmen.com about the top 10 Japanese etiquette mistakes. Boiled down to bullet points, we have: Blowing your nose in public Pointing with your forefinger Don't pour your own beer Wearing toilet slippers outside of toilet Giving gifts in multiples of four Failing to wash first before entering a public bath Passing food ...


35

I live in Japan (Tokyo) and no one gives up their bus or train seats unless the standing person is clearly incapable of standing for long (old, injured, pregnant). Then they are fairly good about it. What's really entertaining is watching two elderly people with canes / walkers etc. arguing about which one of them need the seat more. And it's the "good" ...


35

No it is not rude. I've lived in London most of my life and travelled in hundreds of black cabs and can assure you that cabbies really do not care what you get up to in the back of the cab -- as long as you pay the fare, give them a decent tip and don't spill food/drink/bodily fluid.


33

I've been in a similar situation many times when travelling during business hours to/from meetings - or, often, when going to the airport - where I've had to jump in on conference calls where I knew it would be for the duration of the ride. I usually excuse myself before the call, letting them know that I'm going to be on a call (even if I'm not talking). ...


28

So, you should prepay for however much gas you intend to buy. In most cases, you'll probably want to either fill the gas tank, or just buy an amount of gas that corresponds to a nice round dollar amount like 20 dollars, to make the transaction quick and easy. If you want to top off the tank, just prepay for an amount that you know exceeds the amount ...


22

what is expected of me while I stay there If someone carries your luggage to your room, they expect a tip ($1 to $2 per bag). It's also customary to leave a tip for the maid ($1 to $3 per day). Otherwise, it's really the other way round: it's the job of the hotel staff to meet your expectations (within reasonable bounds) - you're paying, after all. ...


22

I believe you are mixing two pieces of advice. The best currencies are Euros, Canadian Dollars... This is because of the trade embargo against Cuba from the USA. This means US dollars are very expensive to exchange in Cuba, so other currencies should be used. Euros are often said to get the best exchange rate. This is not saying that vendors, hotels or ...


21

I am answering this because I worked as a cabin crew for years (flight attendant) and still a part of the cabin crew now (cabin crew inspector). The best would be a thank you, with some details explaining why you're thanking. Believe me this was the best thing I used to get, because passengers are not always thankful and it is always us who welcome them, ...


19

It's all about education. Kids are taught the following table manners from the age of around 2: You eat at the table When you are done, say "Gochisousamadesu" When you say you're done, you're done This is reinforced at kindergarten/elementary school lunches (no snacks, school-supplied lunch that's the same for every student). Those manners stick. And ...


19

Short answer, no -- not really. You could always take a change of clothes (or at least a different top) in your carry on and attempt to freshen up in the toilets. Take some wet wipes too. You could also try and find a shower in the city before heading to the airport. Depending what airport you're in there may be a way to pay for lounge / shower access -- ...


19

Actual practice varies widely by country, but there are (at least) four reasons why hotels frown on having more guests in a room than you originally told them. Fire code. Hotels and rooms are rated for maximum occupancy: if they get busted for having two people in a room for one, or (worse) 101 guests in a hotel rated for 100, there are serious legal ...


19

Why not use a credit card and ask for a full tank? That's what I do. If you want to pre-pay in cash, it's ok to pay more than you need and get the change back. Cars usually have gas tanks that are 10-20 gallons in size. So if it is half full, estimate 10 gallons and pay for 10 x $currentpriceingallons. So if it is $3 per gallon, prepay $30 (or $40 to be ...


18

Mark's answer is excellent and covers all the big ones. From experience, just thought I'd add some other / my own social faux pas: Eating in public whilst walking Crossing your legs in front of your superiors (boss or manager, usually) Wiping your face with 'oshibori' (moist cloth given before a meal to clean your hands) Stabbing food with chopsticks ...


18

My intuition as a Londoner was that this was absolutely fine, but then I had a moment of self-doubt and worried that maybe I'd been being rude in not talking much to cabbies all these years. So I sought out this ethnographic study of cab drivers: Inside the Mind of a Cabbie (RSA) and that has confirmed my impression that the time and space are basically ...


17

I'm Chinese so I can probably tell you this. As you're a foreigner they know already that you're not used to their culture. So, be yourself and you'll be fine. If anything, I guess it must be you to prepare for culture shock. As most of my foreigner friends complain about the spitting and toilets. So be prepared. Another thing is they smoke everywhere, if ...


16

I live in Japan and every day commute with trains and metro. And can assure you that nobody will think you are rude by offering the seat. From my personal experience: I have a rule to always give up my seat to Disabled/injured people Pregnant women (in Japan they wear a badge like this ...


15

You'll find that it varies from host to host, and this is often indicated on their profile. Some are excited to meet new people, but can't actually host - so they'll often just say they want to meet you in town for a coffee or similar. Others will have a bed and a spare room, and can be amazingly generous. However they do understand that you're ...


15

In my opinion Airbnb is nothing but a short-let provider. Yes people do rent out their spare rooms, and thus welcome you in their house. But they do so in exchange for money, very much like a hotel, or a bed-and-breakfast, would do. In that sense I don't think tipping is necessary. If you want to show appreciation to an excellent host, the best way to do ...


15

Every piano I've ever seen has had a 'not for public use' (or equivalent) sign on it. If you find one that doesn't it's still polite to ask, but they're probably content with people playing it if they don't say otherwise. Or they just installed it this morning and haven't seen the problem yet ... If you can play the piano decently I really doubt anyone will ...


15

I would feel comfortable sitting down at any piano that doesn't have a sign saying not to. Assuming they don't have music playing that you would be in competition with, and assuming that you're good and aren't going to play the same thing over and over, I would keep the following principle in mind: It's easier to ask forgiveness than permission. - Rear ...


14

Having been to both during Ramadan: In all reasonably touristy areas in Thailand, including the southern resort islands, you basically will not notice Ramadan at all -- pretty much everything is open as usual. Malaysia, though, is a different story. While you certainly can get drinks and food, most places that stay open do so a little discreetly, with ...


14

So, there are two mechanical solutions to, what is, fundamentally social problem, but before I provide them, I want to make clear that employing these is an easy way to be regarded as a jerk by your fellow passengers, and not without merit; the seat is designed to recline, and while putting it back can be inconsiderate, restricting the use of the feature by ...


13

I usually round up to the next 5 dollar increment, with a minimum of 15%. If paying by credit card, I'll usually just use the automatic 20% button (the smallest offered), out of laziness. This WSJ Article claims that the average in NYC is 18-19%. Which is above the national average by a little, but not much. That's a pretty decent number to target, but I'll ...


13

Yes, it is correct and fine to wipe your hand, face, neck with it, be it with hot or cold towels. You can see that pretty much everywhere in Asia. In Japan, you will be given one at hairdressers to specifically to wipe your face with it. Specially when it's hot and humid outside, a cold towel on your neck is something very nice!


13

Your first point is almost universally true. Whilst there are a few onsen that allow swimming suits and the like, the vast majority do not. The only one I've experienced was in Kagoshima, and this was because it was a small but famous onsen; too small to segregate men and women and so Japanese yukata were permitted. As for your second point, yes, you ...


12

Lifehacker actually has a post about ways to find out which seats are actually non-reclining, so that you can try and book the seats behind them. A similar article of theirs shows the (meaner) option of blocking the seat with something like a water bottle. (from gawkerassets) There's the aforementioned Knee Defender, as well, but that's where you start ...



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