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3

The procedure you are referring to is called a Change of Status (CoS in us-immigarion speak). It is explicitly forbidden to do a CoS, when admitted via visa waiver (ESTA) (see previous link as well). The best way would be go out of the country for a short while (Canada, Mexico, most of the Caribbean islands), obligatory surrendering your I-94W (if you are ...


-1

Going for that visa was extremely stupid of you. You had a valid ESTA and should've travelled - no one would've raised an eyebrow. Now it's likely that the embassy has forwarded the Details to the CBP, so that once you land, you'll get sent back with a 10-year entry ban,


2

The answer would appear to be no. The US State department offers this flier on business travel to the US suitable for the B-1 Visa (and by extension the VWP) on their website about the VWP. While some of the activities you describe (meetings etc) would fall under the B-1, there is always the note of "no income from a US-based company", which you will be ...


18

You don't spend time in USA "under an ESTA" -- ESTA is an authorization to travel to the USA, and only for that. Once you've gotten there, you will be staying as a nonimmigrant alien admitted under the Visa Waiver Program. See this Question and Answer for more information. An ESTA is generally valid for 2 years or until your passport expires, whichever ...


1

Canada isn't part of any "ESTA area"; ESTA concerns just the US. There's a regulation aimed at preventing people from resetting their ESTA duration-of-stay clock by making short trips to Canada, the Caribbean, or Mexico, but you don't need to be concerned about that because you're not doing that. Rather, you are residing temporarily in Canada, and ...


5

Yes, you are considered a repeated traveler as long as you have been to the US at least once after 2008. From the Automated Passport Control (APC) Page: Who Is Eligible to Use APC U.S. and Canadian passport holders and international visitors from Visa Waiver Program countries are eligible to use APC kiosks. Visa Waiver Program visitors must have ...


6

From the ESTA FAQ (my emphasis): Can I apply for an ESTA without having confirmed travel plans? Yes. Specific travel plans are not mandatory at the time of application, but you will need a U.S. point of contact. Although specific travel plans are not required, the address where you will be staying in the United States is recommended to ...


2

Almost certainly, you are, as suggested in a comment, overthinking this. It will probably go just as smoothly as your prior visit. Very, very rarely, I've had immigration officers ask for documents confirming what I've told them. For example, I have been a US permanent resident since 1978. Usually, I just show my UK passport and US green card when ...


3

It's no problem to change your name. People do this all the time. You might be asked briefly about it, but if you don't have any adverse immigration history, it should not be an issue. To be sure, you can bring your old passport and deed poll. The most important thing to do with immigration is to relax and answer any questions honestly but briefly. You ...


8

Given the circumstances of your application and the recent change of US law, I think it is most likely that your ESTA application has landed on someone's desk for review by a human being. The new law makes people who have visited Iraq since 2011 ineligible for an ESTA, with some exceptions. I think it is most likely that someone is meant to determine ...


1

Yes. When you return to the United States, the border officer can, and probably will, readmit you under your original 90-day stay: Trips to Canada, Mexico, or nearby Islands If you are admitted to the United States under the VWP, you may take a short trip to Canada, Mexico, or a nearby island and generally be readmitted to the United States under ...


2

I assume that you are a national of a Visa Waiver Program country. If your cruise to Alaska is on a private vessel, or a commercial cruise operated by someone other than an "approved carrier," you are not eligible to use the VWP. You must apply for a visa. If your cruise to Alaska is a commercial cruise operated by an approved carrier, you must have ...


3

You should have no trouble with this. You certainly are not the first person to acquire a new citizenship after visiting the US, so they are used to it happening. As long as you fill out all the question correctly on your ESTA (which you need if you enter by air or sea) and/or VWP application, and tell them about your previous citizenships if asked, you ...



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