New answers tagged

2

You should have no trouble with this. You certainly are not the first person to acquire a new citizenship after visiting the US, so they are used to it happening. As long as you fill out all the question correctly on your ESTA (if applicable) and/or VWP application, and tell them about your previous citizenships if asked, you shouldn't have a problem.


2

Yes, it's fine. If you travel back to the UK, in fact, or anywhere other than Canada, Mexico, or the Caribbean, your subsequent visit should be on a new 90-day period, so you could be in the US for 60 days, in the UK for two weeks, and then in the US for 30 days or even 45 or 60. If you travel for a short time to an adjacent country, however, your ...


4

I was on a student visa (F1) when I got GlobalEntry, and I asked what happens when I move back and use ESTA. The CBP person told me that both ESTA and GlobalEntry are both CBP programs, so they share information CBP will know about my new ESTA, and I don't need to do anything for GlobalEntry. Considering this, I think it's safe to assume they would know ...


2

What you are planning to do complies with the rules. There is no "minimum waiting time" until you can re-enter under the visa waiver program after an expired J-1 visa (and after your DS-2019 expired), provided that your reason for visiting the US is OK with the VWP rules. Yet, it is very much advisable to bring all documentation that you can provide to show ...


3

This is the full answer about "dual national" from the VWP Improvement FAQ cited by another answer: How is “dual citizen” or “dual national” defined? What if I was born in a country, but never lived there and do not consider myself a national or citizen? We will make nationality determinations in accordance with U.S. legal standards and ...


12

On Visa Waiver Program Improvement and Terrorist Travel Prevention Act Frequently Asked Questions, the U.S. authorities state: How is “dual citizen” or “dual national” defined? What if I was born in a country, but never lived there and do not consider myself a national or citizen? We will make nationality determinations in accordance with U.S. legal ...


4

The circumstances that require a new ESTA are listed here and include only: passport change name change gender change citizenship change something happens (e.g. criminal conviction, overstay) that might cause the loss of the VWP privilege and require you to get a visa instead. Otherwise the ESTA you applied for is good for 2 years regardless of how other ...


1

First of all, never lie to immigration. This has been repeated very often on this site. What Tor-Einar Jarnbjo's otherwise correct answer is missing is he considers "national" and "citizen" the same and it is most definitely not! For example, people born on American Samoa are USA nationals but not USA citizens. So, what is a national? Let's read the law: ...


2

You can find the Iranian nationality laws in 'The Civil Code of the Islamic Republic of Iran' article 976 ff. Basically, all children of Iranian men are considered Iranian citizens (article 976.2), also if they were born outside Iran and have never lived there. Since it is up to the 'issuing' country to define who are considered their citizens, I don't ...


3

Go to https://esta.cbp.dhs.gov/esta/ and click "Check existing application", "Check individual status", "Confirm". Type in your passport number and ESTA confirmation number, or click "I do not know the application number" and type in name and citizenship too. If you find a valid ESTA, there'll be an "update" link (not a button!) in one of the last columns ...


2

No. Travelers "will not be required to update their destination addresses or itineraries should they change after their ESTA application has been approved." See http://www.cbp.gov/travel/international-visitors/frequently-asked-questions-about-visa-waiver-program-vwp-and-electronic-system-travel Q: Can prospective travelers apply for an ESTA without ...


1

Travel plans are subject to change, and the CBP know this. Indeed one can even apply for an ESTA with provisional, if not indefinite, plans. If admitted for entry in the US under the Visa Waiver Program, you'll be authorised to stay for a maximum of 90 days. The important thing is not overstaying, rather than extending a provisional travel plan. When the ...


13

What Is the US Visa Waiver Program? The US Visa Waiver Program (VWP) allows travellers of certain nationalities to visit the US for tourism or business purposes without the need for a visa, for a maximum of 90 days. This is a bilateral agreement, meaning that all countries participating in the VWP must allow US citizens to visit for tourism or business ...


8

The short answer is no, you cannot stay for 100 days using the ESTA and the Visa Waiver Program. You will have to apply for a visa or change your travel plans. The longer answer involves clearing up a lot of misunderstandings - primarily about what an ESTA (and the related VWP) is. See this question for a full description. The ESTA does not allow you to ...


0

Under the VWP, you are allowed to stay in the United States for up to 90 days. See https://travel.state.gov/content/visas/en/visit/visa-waiver-program.html for more information.


4

The ESTA guidelines say: Each approved ESTA application generally is valid for two years or until the applicant’s passport expires, whichever comes first. A new travel authorization is required if: (1) the traveler is issued a new passport; (2) the traveler changes his or her name; (3) the traveler changes his or her gender; (4) the traveler’s country of ...


2

When you travel on your Canadian passport, you won't be using your ESTA authorization. You won't be using the visa waiver program. It's therefore not necessary to keep your ESTA registration up to date (if that's even possible).



Top 50 recent answers are included