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17

There's an important distinction between leaving the US temporarily, and leaving permanently, which is as much as anything dictated by you returning to your place of residence. If you are in the US under the Visa Waiver Program (VWP) and you leave the US for a few weeks to visit Canada (or Mexico) with an intent to return to the US then you are deemed to ...


15

Speaking from first-hand experience, I can say with certainty that YES, you CAN use the VWP in order to enter the US to attend a job interview, either for a job in the US or for a job outside of the US. A VWP is functionally equivalent to a B1/B2 visa (they often actually write B1 or B2 on the entry stamp to designate this!), and there are no other visas ...


13

ESTA stands for "Electronic System for Travel Authorization". The key word here is "Electronic". This refers not only to the fact that the ESTA is applied for online, but also to the fact that it is checked electronically. When you checked-in for your flight to the US, the airline would have electronically confirmed that you had an ESTA, and thus you were ...


13

The Visa-Waiver Program, or VWP (which is what the ESTA relates to) allows you to enter the US for the purposes of Tourism or Business, but not for 'work'. The distinction here is really down to where you are paid. Presuming you are already working for this company, and being paid in the UK, then your visit to their US offices is classified as a "business" ...


13

The ESTA is valid for two years. However, the visit duration is maxed at 90 days, and does not reset if you visit Canada or Mexico - you have to leave North America to reset it. The only problem with returning again 'soon' is that there may be additional questions to ensure you're not trying to re-enter to work or stay. But as long as you have the ...


11

I've found the answer in the DHS ESTA FAQ. The bad news is that if you renew your passport, you have to re-apply (and pay again) for a new ESTA: What should I do if the information on my passport has changed? If you obtain a new passport or there is a change to your passport information, you must apply for a new travel authorization and pay the ...


10

Neither an ESTA or a Visa guarantees entry to a country. This is true for every country in the world - the final decision to allow you entry or not to the country is made by the immigration officials at the border at the time of entry. However, the odds of being turned away at the border are extremely small - unless you've specifically done something to ...


9

There is no requirement for visa to be valid for travelling within the US as long as your identification is valid you will be allowed to board the flight. The problem will come if you decide after flying back to Australia to re-enter the US. More likely then not you will not be able to enter under a VWP, since you have overstayed your visa. Whether or not ...


9

No. Firstly, note that you'll likely be required to get a visa at the border with the US, even though you're in the visa-waiver countries for ESTA - it apparently only counts for flights, or within 90 days of a flight into the US if arriving by land(!) as I found out, twice. However, leaving the country there's not even a passport check - you simply need ...


9

Short Answer The short answer to your question is you should check the "staying" box since the purpose of your layover is to visit friends. The duration of this layover is not important according to US immigration laws. What matters is the purpose. See below for the explanation. Long Answer Defining Transit vs Stay I believe that the temporal ...


9

Firstly, it's a little tricky - the ESTA doesn't always mean you can arrive by land. Indeed, it usually only applies to land borders within 90 days of a flight into the US (go figure). However, I've done this and it's not a big deal. I've done both ways: Within 90 days of a flight, they looked at my ESTA stamp and once asked for my return ticket to ...


8

From a lawyer: Overstaying the Visa Waiver Program means that you will face more difficulty trying to return to the US. You will be ineligible for the Visa Waiver Program in the future, because you overstayed. You will have to apply for a B-2 visitor visa to visit the US. If you overstay the time that you were given on the visa waiver ...


8

There's a convenient page on the ESTA program website: When my ESTA expires how do I renew my application? If your ESTA has expired, you must reapply for a brand new authorization by submitting a new application. Current authorizations can not be extended. Go to ESTA.cbp.gov, follow the instructions to answer all of the required questions and submit a new ...


8

According to CBP you cannot extend your stay for more then 30 days and even then in the case of emergency. The good news is that noone yet canceled availability of B1/B2 visas for the citizens of VWP countries. So if you obtain a B2 visa, which you shouldn't have a problem doing you can enter the US for the period of 6 months and hike one of the trails ...


7

You have an edge case. Typically, it is OK for the ESTA to expire during your visit. From US Customs and Border Protection website: Does my ESTA need to be valid for my entire stay in the United States? No, An ESTA is only required to be valid on the day you enter the United States. The ESTA does not need to be valid for the entire time a ...


7

Good news - as a Canadian citizen, you're a member of one of the few groups that don't need visas for the US. From the Canadian Embassy website: Note: ESTA is not required for citizens of Canada. On 12 January 2009, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) introduced ESTA, the Electronic System for Travel Authorization. This online system is part of the ...


7

As long as you meet these requirements you should be fine. As Tom said, they'll ask where you're staying so I would have a cheap motel booked for at least one night.


7

Nope. I've changed my residency from UK, to NZ, to Canada in the last 1.5 years, and have used my ESTA as recently as last week, and it's fine. It's tied solely to your passport/citizenship. I was open about my changes at the border, my Canadian permit is even in my passport, and they were totally fine. Of course, once your ESTA is more than two years ...


7

Short answer: You're still OK, but you have to leave the US before January 8th. You can go anywhere you wish, but before you try to re-enter the US, you must enter a country other than Mexico, Canada or the Caribbean states. For example, it will be fine to travel to Mexico, then Costa Rica, and then return to the US. Longer answer: It's important to ...


6

1) Yes. Reporting is all automated. The airlines notify the US government when the person left the country, which is then matched against the record created when they entered and passed through immigration. 2) Your friend is no longer eligible to use the Visa Waiver Program. One of the conditions of the VWP is that you must have "complied with all ...


6

To answer them in order: Yes it is OK, but why consider it? You don't know if ESTA will be approved so reserve: London->Toronto->London and then if you need to depending on the length of your visit you may be able to get a ticket in Toronto or reserve it separately later. If the question does come up see below. Well you know that you will be in Toronto ...


6

Yes, you can apply for a B1/B2 visa (or for that matter, any other visa) whilst you hold an ESTA. In general this would not be required as a ESTA/VWP gives you basically the same status as a B1/B2, however the reason you've stated is one of the few differences - VWP is only valid for 3 months, whilst a B1/B2 can allow you to stay longer (normally up to 6 ...


6

Nobody will be able to give you a definitive answer on this, but I suspect that you'd still be at high risk of being denied entry even if you switch from ESTA to a visitor visa. Alternatively, you might be denied the visitor visa, which would save you the hassle of flying there in the short term, but is a major problem in the long term: you'll be ...


6

You don't need to worry, as it's all done electronically and automatically now, so you don't need to do anything yourself. From the CBP page I-94 Goes Electronic: Foreign visitors to the U.S. arriving via air or sea no longer need to complete paper Customs and Border Protection Form I-94 or I-94W. Those who need to prove their legal-visitor ...


5

Nowadays they are asking for a visa that you can fill up online 48h previous your flight (Yes even for European people). If you have time to fill it up you should be good.


5

You can not apply for a US Visa from within the US - it needs to be done outside of the country. In general the best place to apply is in her home country (Australia, I presume). It's also possible to apply via the US consulate at any other country, however it may take longer for the application to be processed, and there may be a higher chance of being ...


5

Yes, you do need an ESTA. Puerto Rico has the same visa requirements as the mainland US (= ESTA needed for EU citizens), and like all other US airports, San Juan's airport does not recognize the concept of visa-free transit.


5

This is a curious case which will need to be addressed by the nearest Costa Rican Consulate. Costa Rica provides a waiver of visa for people who have a visa with at least one day validity stamped in their passport. This is the same text that exists for the holders of the US Student (F, J) or work (H, G, etc) visas (sorry can't copy the exact text for some ...


5

It's where you live where you fill out the application. On mine I put UK, even though a NZ citizen and had been travelling in South America for 4 months, I was returning to London. No problems. A year and a half later, while on my way to a Canadian working holiday (same situation as you), I stopped in Hawaii for a few days on the way (so also had a ...


5

Not at all. If you're getting the ESTA/VWP, it's valid for 90 days travel (there are some weird laws about exiting and coming back in, all has to be done within 90 days if you're doing Canada/Mexico as well), but 46 days is half that! To have a smooth transition, you'll want to have proof of onward travel, address of your first few nights' accommodation if ...



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