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30

First, I believe you are overreacting to the current situation, all I'm aware of is the disappearance of flight MH370, and I believe that will eventually prove to have a tragic but non-malicious explanation, with an accident, heroic pilots (and maybe a touch of government bureaucratic incompetency thrown-in during the search, not that it would have probably ...


17

A non-exit row window seat is just like any other normal seat, except with a view. You have no additional requirements to sit in that seat. The individuals who sit in the exit row have additional responsibilities. They're required to receive a briefing beforehand from the attendant, who will explain what they will be required to do in an emergency ...


16

There's several conditions you'll have to meet to sit in an exit row, such as being in good health. If you meet those, I don't think you have to worry. In the case of an emergency, you'd have to assess the situation outside before opening the window and throwing it out of the plane. You'll be briefed by the flight attendant, so don't worry if you don't ...


16

The phrasing "government funded flight" suggests that the flight was chartered by the Australian government. Charter flights are not usually eligible for miles. For example, Rule 9.3.1 of Qantas's Frequent Flyer rules says: Subject to the exclusions in clauses 9.3.2 and 9.4, Points for air travel may be earned only for paid travel or Any Seat Awards ...


15

First of all, it depends on why your card is retained. I can think of at least three common situations: You have entered a wrong PIN too many times. Your issuing bank has decided to cancel and retain your card, e.g. because you have exceeded your credit limit and they want to prevent you from charging the card at "offline merchants". This may of course be ...


14

This Anglo List webpage on the topic carries information on various useful contact numbers in Israel, including emergency numbers: Note you can also use 112 to contact emergency services in many countries including Israel, in which it is callable from mobile phones only.


12

Short answer: The captain has to divert to the nearest airport in case the urgent medical attention will save a life. Long answer: The first thing the crew should do once there is a sick passenger is looking for a medical professional onboard. A doctor will be preferred but a nurse or so will do the job in case no doctor is available. Now if there is a ...


12

Do NOT write in your passport, apart from the fields specified. Any additional marking that isn't done by passport officials can cause you problems at borders - I've seen it happen first hand :/ Also - as @Kate says, a medical staff member is unlikely to look at your passport for such things. In general, best practice is to get a Medic Alert wrist ...


12

I wouldn't count on your passport being something other people looked at when deciding to treat you. In Canada people use MedicAlert bracelets for this purpose - according to their website they're international. Really important things like allergies are engraved on the back, and there's a code that hospitals can use when they phone, and they can get ...


12

If you have a GSM phone (with a SIM-card), 112 is likely to work in many places (see the list in the link). Note that it will work whether you're roaming, or don't have a SIM in the phone at all and the phone is locked. That's basically the only number you're guaranteed by the GSM standard to always be able to dial, and the mobile operators are required to ...


11

You can find the list of phones in the Wikipedia: Emergency_telephone_number For most countries in Europe is 112


11

I have a MedicAlert® bracelet. Firstly, it's a convenient item that first-aiders can check if you are unable to speak for yourself, which describes conditions you may have. It also contains a phone number for more information which they could use. There are downsides - it requires you to wear it the whole time. I don't even notice mine any more, but I ...


9

How am I supposed to act in case of an emergency? Act like a pro! here are few tips that will make you a qualified cabin crew in minutes: If you are not physically fit, say it! it is not a shame to refuse sitting next to an emergency exit, it is totally your right to refuse. If you are not mentally willing to, say it. Especially if you are among the 5% ...


8

I am not sure bitcoins are already useful for the day to day life. It's not that common yet. But there are places (hotels, etc) that are starting to take them: http://bitcoin.travel/ - Check this website. Filter, for instance by accommodation. The coin is spreading. Even in rural areas where you would expect it to appear later. A nice example is for ...


8

This is from a guide published by the California Hotel & Lodging association: The mere fact that an innkeeper has a legal right to evict someone does not give the innkeeper the right to carry out the eviction in a manner that would place the person in a position of harm. Additionally, according to that guide the eviction of a non-paying guest ...


7

Well the main problem is that the host/hostel staff have yet to meet you. They don't necessarily know you, and they don't know what emergency it will be for. So the call might go something like: Operator: What's your Emergency? Host: Er, I'm not sure. Someone's meant to turn up, and they haven't? Operator: Can you describe them? Host: No, I've never ...


7

Not that useful. If you're a True Believer who is intent on conducting business in bit coin whenever possible, nsn's answer shows that there are destinations and businesses with which you can transact, yes. As this recent WSJ article demonstrates there are travelers making a concerted effort at it. The article also includes links to a few notable travel ...


7

So let's say you have to make an emergency landing, as you describe. 37% of fatalities occur in the final phases of flight - the initial approach, final approach and the landing. (Cynics will claim it almost all happens upon 'landing'). It could also be that your take-off went badly and they're doing an emergency landing after that. So combining the two, ...


7

I can't tell you what they would actually do, but I'm going to quote from the T&C anyway, because that's what lays out what they're legally obliged to do. And, alas, the answer is basically nothing. Boldface mine: The Hosts, not Airbnb, are solely responsible for honoring any confirmed bookings and making available any Accommodations reserved ...


7

Commonly, emergency phone numbers like 911 in the US or 112 in most European countries can not be called from abroad. Even within the country, emergency calls are usually handled completely different in the phone network, allowing the calls to be connected with priority, routed to the closest dispatcher centre and passing on details about the caller like ...


6

A necklace or bracelet is a common thing to check for, so if you do have a condition which would impact care or diagnosis it is strongly recommended that you do wear it. Most first aiders will check for these things.


6

If the ATM is in a bank agency and it's working hours you can go inside and ask them to give you the card back. It's not 100% guaranteed that they will give it back. Each bank has its own policies. Most likely they will identify you (you probably have to give them an ID or Passport), they will make a copy of the ID/Passport and they will return the card. ...


6

Well, when a patient has penicillin allergy in a hospital, we always write Sine Penicillium on their bed sheet, which gives an information to any medical professional that the patient is not to be given any of the antibiotics from the penicillin strand. But it is true, an EMT or a doctor wouldn't look into your passport to check about your medical ...


6

Hello @JuanIgnacioIglesias and welcome to Russia. You should be registered in Moscow, if you'll stay there more than 7 days. It doesn't depends do you require visa or not. Registration in Moscow is obligatory for all foreign people. If you stay with AirBnb, ask your homeowner to make the registration for you. All information about registration procedure ...


5

Some of my advice is the exact opposite of Ankur's! I've lost my VISA card three times travelling, all three times in countries without their own VISA offices: Vietnam circa 2000, Nicaragua circa 2007, and Georgia in 2012. I only took advantage of the "emergency cash" assistance on the second occasion. I've also met travellers with lost, stolen, or blocked ...


5

One thing you should be aware of is not all cases of an ATM eating your card are merely accidental equipment failure. There is actually a variety of ATM skimmer that prevents the ATM from properly ejecting your card, allowing the thief to come along after you have left, and steal your card: ...


5

The actual process would depend on your location and passport, but you can of course in principle be stamped back in. You'd have technically left the country which stamped you out. Not departing, for whatever reason, would require you to, technically, enter the country again, with all due consequences. You might have to purchase an (emergency?) visa on the ...


5

I think there's probably not much you can do: If you have a mobile phone, you can always try to contact someone, but it seems the chances of having network coverage are rather slim. You could hope that whoever took over the plane forgot to shut down the in-flight phones and call somebody with those. Your chances of disturbing the pilot when he is in the ...



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