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1

Just as a note for future travels, as far as I remember beside of the problem with the battery in the luggage you might face a second problem: Electronic devices in your carry on must be able to be turned on for inspection. They will not ask for this every time, but it can happen, and happened to me already several times. You will have a hard time turning ...


1

There is one additional reason your approach may not only lead to your battery being confiscated, but now your laptop being confiscated. As specified in this article, all electronic devices carried in carry-on luggage must be fully charged and functional. If it does not turn on, it may be confiscated prior to boarding. There are now concerns that ...


3

Due to safety concerns, IATA issues guidelines concerning the transport of lithium batteries, which airlines will likely enforce. (In a worst case scenario, a lithium battery could spontaneously explode and cause a fire in the cargo hold, which is inaccessible to humans during the flight.) The Lithium Battery Guidance Document for 2014 states (emphasis ...


1

I've researched the regulations since then, and it seems that some airlines/airports do not allow you to pack "spare" lithium batteries in your checked in luggage. This leaves us wondering what exactly the definition of "spare" is, as this was not really a spare battery; we just separated it from the laptop temporarily for traveling. A "spare" battery ...


0

It seems that quite recently explosives have been developed that cannot be distinguished from a battery on an X-ray. On the other hand, they are easily distinguished from a battery by the fact that your laptop doesn't work with one of these inside your laptop instead of a battery. That's why you will find that you can be asked to prove that your laptop is ...


4

Lithium batteries are a safety hazard as a thermal runaway can and has lead to fires. They are permitted in carry-on because if a fire starts, it can be fought and extinguished, as in this incident near Sydney. the Australian Transport Safety Bureau remarked in their investigation: In the meantime, the ATSB stressed, "this event reinforces the importance ...


12

As I understand it, lithium batteries are not permitted to be carried aboard if there is any possibility of the contacts being shorted out in transit (this can lead to excessive current draw, heat, and possibly fire or even explosion). If the battery is inside your laptop, it is considered protected against accidental short. If a battery is carried outside ...


1

The device may or may not work, but in any case it is not a good idea to try to use it. As greyshade already mentioned, the print on the device states that it operates with 230 Volts at 50Hz, and the US power net does not provide that. Even a transformer would formally not help as the US power system operates on 60Hz, and a transformer will not change that. ...


12

The fourth line of text on the device (counting those two lines on the top right) says: EINGANG 230V~50Hz 4W where 'Eingang' is German for 'input', '230V~50Hz' means '230Volts AC at 50Hz' and 4W is the maximum power. Since the US mains have a voltage of 120V and a frequency of 60Hz, you will need a transformer, but then the device will work.



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