New answers tagged

3

With some "minor" exceptions, this is trouble-free. You are perfectly allowed to take a harddisk, however there is of course a but (that had to come!). First, what you can take aboard is defined by the IATA guidelines (which are pretty liberal, you could even carry a knife if you have a justifiable reason (tool) as well as other pretty dangerous things) .. ...


12

There are no restrictions on portable hard drives. You can carry as many as you like in your carry-on luggage. All luggage is subject to search and inspection. Your hard drives are not physically opened and searched; however customs officials have the right to plug your drive in and search its contents for illegal material. If they do this, depends ...


15

Yes, you can. Pretty much every time I travel by plane I carry one or more external hard disks in my hand luggage. This has never been an issue, to the extent that, on occasion, my luggage does get searched by hand, as opposed to just by machine. I very much advise against putting a hard disk, or any sensitive electronics for that matter, in checked-in ...


3

During extensive travel through Europe, America and Asia I have not seen restrictions that have an issue with power banks below 20000mAh. With this in mind, a ~16000mAh power bank would be a fine option; the ipad air battery capacity is somewhere around 8000mAh so you would have a pack that could effectively triple your devices on-time. Officially, the IATA ...


2

From @Newton's comment (to whom credit): I am an American and I was asked to turn my laptop and tablet on when traveling from Pakistan to Qatar. The tablet was broken (hence couldn't be powered on) so they did some extra checks on it and gave it back to me. If this example was following standard policy, security should be able to verify your laptop is ...


2

Answer is of course, yes. It's totally OK to check items like TVs, microwaves, appliances, when you fly. You see people doing this every time. I believe you should NOT have to pay tax. It would be good if you had the receipt that you originally bought it in Italy, but, my guess if you could "talk your way" from it. After all, it will not look brand new. ...


8

I've had this issue at some security checkpoints and not others. The difference, in my observation, is in the conveyor belts. I've never had it happen at a checkpoint where the rollers under the belt are metal. If the rollers under the belt are plastic (I think it's Delrin or nylon), it happens very frequently. The charge is being built up by the belt vs. ...


2

For Android, if you'd prefer to do it with free software and not involve google, OSMTracker works for me, and does what it sounds like you want. I've not used it in a motor vehicle, but I've often used it to track a day's hiking (with a view to comparing what I'd travelled with the underlying map, and adding any missing paths to OSM).


3

Moves is an app which does what you want. It's not apparent from the home page, but on the iOS site you can see the mapping feature at work.


3

It sounds to me that what you're looking for is something like Fog of World (for iOS). It's perhaps a bit too much like a game, where you 'unfog' a map of the world as you move around. There are a few other apps out there that work similarly. Fog of World is 5 bucks, but there's also a free competitor for iOS. However, I can't now remember the name of that ...


4

If you have an Android phone the easiest way is to use Google's location history. You might already have it enabled. See here. The iphone has a similar facility apparently.


6

There are a couple (literally: I saw 2) publicly accessible sockets in the primary B terminal, which is nice and modern but very crowded; both of the sockets I saw were in use, which isn't surprising because there were probably a couple hundred people in the terminal. However, but there are many more sockets in the A terminal, which is older, dirty, and ...


1

If the PSU doesn't say it will work on the lower voltage then it probablly won't. Normal sockets in the US are 120V. Most US houses will have both 120V and 240V available at the breaker panel in a "split phase" arrangement but normally the only 240V sockets will be specific ones for high power appliances (stoves, clothes driers, etc). If you own the ...


2

I'm not really sure what this has got to do with travel... You will need a new PSU unless your PSU also operates at 110V. Your alternative would be to use it with a high power transformer. I would not recommend it.


3

All electronic items are allowed except those that are prohibited by the airline; or the country's security rules. These include: Large batteries (see Is it a true that you can't put ordinary Mac laptops (with the battery) in checked luggage? for some details on the capacities). Anything that can be used as a weapon. Electronic items that do not turn ...


0

You are generally allowed to carry power banks and external hard drives with you as carry-on baggage. I had some AA batteries confiscated when I tried to take them with me at Frankfurt. They were for my camera but the officials did not agree. As for other electronic goods, please be more specific so we can let you know from our experiences. Also, this varies ...


4

As I understand it there are various categories of device that people use when taking equipment abroad. Plug adaptors simply convert the type of the plug, they do not change voltage. So they can only be used if the device is compatible with the voltage of the destination country. Thyrister or Triac based converters, work in a similar way to a lighting ...


1

The chances of you being asked about a laptop is near to zero. I have travelled in and out of the US hundreds of times with two laptops, an iPad, two iPhones, iPod, headphones, disk drives, digital cameras... the only thing they have ever looked at was the drives looking for kiddy / animal / snuff porn. I've brought almost brand new electronics from my ...



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