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0

Thanks to mkennedy's comment on the question, I found this clock on Ebay and others like it. The key phrase, as mentioned in her comment, is: silent sweep hand Combining that key phrase with snooze led to many options. Unfortunately, I have no way of checking if any of the alarms do not stop beeping after N minutes or X snooze cycles before purchase. ...


0

Before bringing a laptop from the USA as a present, consider that it has the wrong keyboard, the wrong power plug, you need to make sure that it works with 220 Volt, the receiver may have a hard time getting warranty repairs, and the receiver will not have any EU consumer rights.


3

Yes, you'll be liable to pay 20% VAT on a new laptop if its value is greater than €430 euro in to France from outside the EU customs area. On the plus side, there's no specific duty to pay (see "Ordinateur portable" on this page) You could try and just walk through the "nothing to declare" aisle anyway - but you'd then be smuggling and at some risk of ...


1

I would suggest the Walkabout Universal Adapter with USB .It is a high probability that all your electronics are dual voltage.Walkabout Universal Adapter features a clever design which contains all the major adapters on the planet as well as two high powered USB charging ports. Input power: 100~250V. USB Max. Output power: 5V DC ~ 1000mA. AC Max. Power: AC ...


0

I am not sure about the permitted degree of the liquid. but if the cooled material used(even its quantity may be less but the chemical used to give cooling air, is got noted during the scan) in the Fury X is got more possibility of being checked by the security and even you are ready to pay the 8% VAT.it can happen if they allowed you keep, else you need to ...


3

Most electronics these days adjusts automatically for voltage. The charger for my iPhone does, as do all my computers. In that case all you need is a physical plug adapter like this small and light one. I have half a dozen


4

(iPhone user here) (personal experience) I use my usb adapter directly plugged in to the wall to charge my iPhone in Europe (France, Italy and Spain) The Samsung S3 charger should directly support 110v/220v, you only need a plug adapter which is really small and really cheap.


1

I would suggest The Walkabout Solution adapter. automatically adjusts incoming voltage, whether if you are in a 110-120V country (Like North America) or 220-240V country. (Everywhere else.) Output voltage is always correct for North American products. Even better, the built-in USB port also charges cell phones and iPads, so two items can be charged at once. ...


3

You're proposing to bring this device through a security checkpoint: The more interesting question is, will they even realize that it contains liquid? Seems doubtful to me, simply because it doesn't look anything like a water bottle. Chances are it'll go right through without comment. But based solely on the device's construction I would not want to ...


23

Get a European USB Charger I would buy a USB charger with a European plug (image courtesy of aliexpress): Travel Convenient EU Plug Wall USB Charger Adapter For Samsung Galaxy S5 S4 S3 Note 3 by Ali Express, fair use It beats the weight of your US charger plus a plug adapter, it's cheap a as dirt (2-something bucks on eBay), it can be used for all your ...


3

Try to head to Montparnasse rail station; the Relay stores often have them, due to the large foot passage of foreign travelers (though Montparnasse serves less destinations with different plugs as compared to Gare du Nord or Gare de Lyon). Another TA poster recently had luck at one of the Relay stores in Gare du Nord. and i thought this adaptor is gonna be ...


0

As I understand it, lithium batteries are not permitted to be carried aboard if there is any possibility of the contacts being shorted out in transit (this can lead to excessive current draw, heat, and possibly fire or even explosion). If the battery is inside your laptop, it is considered protected against accidental short. If a battery is carried outside ...


1

I have traveled with two laptops before several times. I carry one laptop in my carry-on luggage and another in my checked bags. It was fine. Nobody asked me anything through immigration check or security check. It is very common these days for one person to carry couple of gadgets with them while travelling due to work or other reasons. If asked in the ...


6

No, they don't. Security looks for weapons and bombs; if it's not either, they're not interested. Of course, there's always the off chance that you'll run into some particularly zealous and clued-in inspector with a fetish for lithium batteries, but realistically I wouldn't worry about it. Also, 90% of the regulation you link to is about transporting ...


1

Considering that laptops and smartphones are allowed, both containing GPUs, I really doubt that taking a graphics card as carry-on would be an issue.


3

I have taken robots the size and shape of a soda can on a carry on that look far "scarier" than a graphics card (gpu is the chip), and no one batted an eye.


2

Also I would look into shipping them to your home in Switzerland... Extra Cost vs Fear of getting them confiscated. Especially if after shipping they are still cheaper than what you would pay in your home country.


14

Building on Calchas' comment, my coworkers and I have carried large, odd-looking electronic research equipment onto international flights on numerous occasions, on different airlines, departing from and passing through different airports. We have never had a problem. Usually, bags containing such equipment are given extra screening; security will pull us ...


6

keeping them sealed in the original packaging might help too, with receipt and original packaging it is easy to explain what it does if the question arises.


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There's no mention of electronic boards etc in the TSA prohibited items list. So provided they aren't so heavy as to be a potential "blunt instrument" weapon, you should be ok. If they're in original packaging, that might help. Of course, they don't have to let any items through, restricted list or not. You may also wish to check the website of your ...


5

In 2009, in an act of stupidity, corruption and bad faith, the brazilian governament created a new standard that's different from all other countries in the world: This image shows the brazillian standard at the bottom and the number of countries (países, in red) that use each other standard. That said, it is still very common to find the american ...


4

Adding an answer from personal experience... I purchased a laptop on a trip to California in 2012. When I returned to the UK, I went through the 'red path' and showed it to the inspector along with about GBP 400 of other stuff I had purchased. The other stuff was generic, like clothes and some USB sticks and what-not. The inspector typed something into ...


14

I question your premise. Take the 15" Macbook pro with retina display. Price in U.K. is GBP 1332.00 + 267 VAT = USD 2035.00 + VAT (using exchange rate today) Price in U.S. is USD 1999.00 + State sales tax. So the difference in pre-tax price is less than 2%. The apparent price difference is mostly your country's tax. If you buy it at retail, say in New ...


12

Yes, Commissioners of HMRC have broad and ancient powers to seize goods they suspect are illegally imported. In this case, unless you can satisfy HMRC that you were not importing the item, you will have to pay a fine and the appropriate duty and VAT on the item. I am not sure I agree with Relaxed's post, I think in this circumstance the item might be ...


4

While they might detain it until you have paid all applicable duties and taxes, customs officers are not primarily interested in seizing goods that can be imported legally. That's what happens to illegal drugs, weapons, some foodstuff or counterfeit goods. For a laptop, if found out, you would be slammed with a significant tax bill (mostly VAT, some duty as ...



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