Hot answers tagged

107

You don't have to be too worried about it, since the aircraft is able to cope with this. People are instructed to turn them off in order to avoid some disturbances and parasite noise in the communication between the pilot and the airport. As electronic devices using radio frequencies, they could also in theory cause some troubles to some aircraft equipment's ...


75

As a cabin crew member for long time, I can tell you that your responsibility ends by notifying a crew member, that's it. Let the crew members deal with it. This is true for all other violations, unless it's a life threatening situation that cannot wait, for example fire! Grab the extinguisher and fight the fire. But that's a whole different issue. ...


64

Do not worry, Wifi pass phrases for personal use should only be in printable ASCII characters, in other words English characters. They do not support Unicode or other codepages. For more details check the Wikipedia's Wi-Fi Protected Access page. Except if you are redirected to a webpage for authentication, that's a whole different story and Karlson's ...


32

I am a software engineer and I also test the software on many different smartphones and tablets. I fly frequently within Europe, so my answer will be limited to this area. However, this is also from west to east and east to west, outside of the Schengen region! As a Dutch citizen, I rarely need a visa to travel, which makes this easy. I do carry a lot of ...


29

For Android depending on the model of your phone you may have to add Russian Language to the available keyboards. I have Galaxy S5 and under Settings -> Languages and Input you should be able to do this from the Galaxy App Store. You should be able to do the same for the iPad just add a Russian Language, which will allow you to switch to it and make the ...


28

A few years ago I read a study about cell phone usage on U.S. domestic flights. Using RF locating equipment, they determined that the average U.S. flight has 2-3 cellphones left transmitting during the flight. Unconfirmed pilot anecdotes notwithstanding, if there were any significant risk of planes malfunctioning from cellphones, they would be falling out ...


27

I am Russian and I never met a WiFi password in Cyrillic.


25

Your personal safety is not affected by your fellow passenger using a cellphone. In the US, the FCC (not the FAA!) has limited use of cellphones on aircraft because of the potential effect on cell towers on the ground. From an empirical standpoint, if there was a significant risk, it would have been observed many times by now as people frequently leave ...


24

Here's my take (please take with a grain of salt, it's based on general travel knowledge and not on any specific experiences like this): People travel with unusual equipment all the time. There's all kinds of scientific, industrial, professional audio, professional photography, etc. equipment, people do try and take all this expensive equipment in hand ...


24

For reference: The 15" MacBook Pro carries a 99.5 watt hour battery. The 13" MacBook Pro carries a 74.9 watt hour battery. The MacBook Air 13" carries a 54 watt hour battery. The MacBook carries a 41.4 watt hour battery. The 12" iPad Pro carries a 38.5 watt hour battery. The MacBook Air 11" carries a 38 watt hour battery. The 9.7" iPad Pro carries a 27.5 ...


20

I've travelled from the UK to many European computer/hacker festivals over the last 10 years or so, often taking strange devices similar to yours (homebrew machines, Raspberry Pi boards, 80s retro computers...) through airport and Eurostar security - and I'd say that about 80% of the time it attracts no attention at all - it just goes through the X-ray with ...


16

There are three concerns: 1) terrorism; 2) export/import limitations; and 3) the fire hazard from the lithium contained in the cell phone and laptop batteries. Terrorism: the difficulty of addressing terrorism is that the level of screening and scrutiny is often arbitrary depending on the current political climate and the capriciousness of the security ...


16

I didn't know until I started working in the field, but the most serious problem with leaving your cellphone on is the frequent failed attempts to connect to the many cell towers you are passing over at 500 mph. Not only does this tie up the towers' ability to connect with other people, it drains your handset battery faster.


15

General rule: read the sticker on the item you want to use, although in some cases it is a text area molded into the plastic of the transformer of the charger. Most laptops, phones, camera chargers and such these days are made to run off 100 as well as 240 volt, and can handle 50 as well as 60 hertz. If something is made to run on 240 volt, it will ...


15

Yes, you can. Pretty much every time I travel by plane I carry one or more external hard disks in my hand luggage. This has never been an issue, to the extent that, on occasion, my luggage does get searched by hand, as opposed to just by machine. I very much advise against putting a hard disk, or any sensitive electronics for that matter, in checked-in ...


13

My father's an airline pilot (United Airlines) and this is something that I've asked him about at length. The idea that any kind of signal from your cellphone can interfere with a plane's electronics is purely myth (Though one that the airlines are happy to allow to propagate). There're endless such signals in the air at all times anyways, and modern ...


12

Your case is quite simple: If the flight costs 500 Dollars, and shipping costs 400 dollars, then choose the latter option, as it saves you 100 dollars. For commercially imported goods, there is no duty free allowance anyway, so you end up paying the same amount of customs for both options. However, since you got these watches quite cheaply, be prepared to ...


12

Travelling with LIPO's The content of this answer is largely borrowed and quoted from my other answer on a similar topic. The regulation regarding quadcopters and check-in luggage is fairly new. Since these devices are becoming increasingly common in industry, academia, and everyday life the legal bureaucracy is somewhat lagging behind and is slowly ...


12

There are no restrictions on portable hard drives. You can carry as many as you like in your carry-on luggage. All luggage is subject to search and inspection. Your hard drives are not physically opened and searched; however customs officials have the right to plug your drive in and search its contents for illegal material. If they do this, depends ...


10

Since 230V is in the range 100-240V, you do not need a transformer. You will probably need an adapter. Botswana doesn't seem to have a standard; can you find out what kind of plugs are in your hotel, or the business you're visiting? I would suggest bringing at least one adapter labeled Africa and a British one, but consider a universal adapter so you can ...


9

As long as your cabin baggage meets the size and weight requirements for the airline, they don't care what you put in it (except airport security will check for dangerous goods). There are no customs procedures for domestic flights.


8

I can verify that the N700a trains have power sockets for the seats at the ends of the cars. Look at the bottom of the side wall under the window near your feet. Plugged in right now, actually :-)


8

I've had this issue at some security checkpoints and not others. The difference, in my observation, is in the conveyor belts. I've never had it happen at a checkpoint where the rollers under the belt are metal. If the rollers under the belt are plastic (I think it's Delrin or nylon), it happens very frequently. The charge is being built up by the belt vs. ...


8

I traveled in Russia in 2011 with a tablet, smartphone, Vita etc. Every WiFi network was in Latin characters. As with most nations they try to be somewhat accommodating to tourists and English is a good baseline, even for people on holiday from other parts of Europe.


8

I've been living in Russia for 3 years, lived in various hostels and hotels, but I never saw a Wi-Fi with a cyrillic password anywhere. I'm not even sure that it's technically possible.


8

Recently, we had an incident in the cabin during boarding (I work for an airline) which lead to deplaning all the passengers. I was one of the team members who were assigned to investigate the incident. The passenger was following the policy, which is almost the same as mentioned in the other answer by @JoErNanO. Unfortunately, the batteries just explode, ...


8

According to the United States FAA, lithium-ion batteries are allowed in checked baggage so long as they are in a consumer electronic device and they are not too large. The FAA has separate regulations about "portable electronic devices, containing batteries" and "lithium ion and lithium metal batteries, spare (uninstalled)". For the former: Most ...


7

Yes, the German type plug will fit in there, if you look closely you will notice a curved notch in the outlet made for round pins. Check the end of the arrow: Actually, plugs with round pins are the standard in Qatar the country, along with the UK type.


7

For the U.S. portion of your trip, the relevant regulation will be 14 CFR 175.10 (a)(18). Here's the passenger-friendly, non-legalese summary version of the relevant CFR from the FAA: Lithium ion batteries (a.k.a.: rechargeable lithium, lithium polymer, LIPO, secondary lithium). Passengers may carry all consumer-sized lithium ion batteries (up to 100 ...


6

Old question but I think the core of the right answer is still missing and since it's potentially a safety concern it may warrant another as answer. All step down transformers are rated for a certain power. If you exceed the rated power, bad things will happen. YOU MUST NEVER EXCEED THE RATED POWER. A hair straightener needs a lot of power and would ...



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