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16

Seems unlikely it's anything more than normal electrostatic discharge. The fact that it only affects you could be related to your clothes or shoes (especially if they are made of synthetic fibers). I also wonder whether the moving conveyor belt could be acting as a Van de Graff generator. Do you not get shocks like that under other circumstances? (I live ...


15

External drives (or internal ones - same drive, different case) will have zero problems with commercial air travel. X-rays don't affect them, and any in-flight vibrations capable of damaging a disk drive will also destroy the airplane. Now that's assuming it's turned off. Running drives don't like to be knocked around, but that applies on your desk too. As ...


14

The fourth line of text on the device (counting those two lines on the top right) says: EINGANG 230V~50Hz 4W where 'Eingang' is German for 'input', '230V~50Hz' means '230Volts AC at 50Hz' and 4W is the maximum power. Since the US mains have a voltage of 120V and a frequency of 60Hz, you will need a transformer, but then the device will work.


13

As I understand it, lithium batteries are not permitted to be carried aboard if there is any possibility of the contacts being shorted out in transit (this can lead to excessive current draw, heat, and possibly fire or even explosion). If the battery is inside your laptop, it is considered protected against accidental short. If a battery is carried outside ...


11

Yes, the regulations did change both in the US and in Europe. There is an older question about using a Kindle on flights, where I recently added an answer explaining the change of rules of both the FAA and the EASA. For your specific case with Swiss, the change by the EASA is responsible. Their press release states: The EU's Aviation Safety Agency ...


10

There is a EUR 430 allowance but it's explicitly for goods “having no commercial character”. So if you want to sell them, you're not OK, no matter their value. Incidentally, even a single brand new Apple Mac Book for your own use would not be OK either because it would be over the limit (bringing back your own used laptop is a different question). It was a ...


9

On your way to where you live in France, when you stopped in Germany, customs asked you questions about your electronics and you told them what you told us - that you had lived in France for 2 years, and bought all these items in the US a year and a half ago. They asked you if you had declared them and paid import duties, and you said no. They then imposed ...


8

Customs usually wants to know the following things: Did you buy it while abroad? Is it coming TO this country, or THROUGH this country? Is it intended for resale? Is it worth their time? A new MacBook in a box brought back by a resident would satisfy 1-4. 2kg of baby wipes, opened, would stop at #3. A MacBook not in a box would probably pass as used and ...


8

Yes, I checked with the consulate security, They said we can carry them, but we cannot use them during the interview. However, you can use them when you are waiting in the lobby.


7

I've done this all over the world without incident. Just make sure your devices are ok with the voltage coming from the wall, and that you're not throwing away grounding protection by using a two prong adapter instead of one with a grounding strip. To check voltages, I use Wikipedia. In your case Spain and the UK are on the same voltage, so that's not an ...


6

While certainly not as good as Nate Eldrege's answer, I have a fairly simple solution for dealing with shocks. Whenever I determine that something is a source of electrostatic discharge, I always put my hand into a fist and discharge with the bottom of my fist (ie: the opposite side that your thumb is on). Tuck your thumb into your closed fist under your ...


6

Not sure where you've been reading that, but I can assure you they're quite wrong, Sim Lim Square sells every make of cheap electronics, so Chinese no-name brands and outright ripoffs are legion. Back in the day when iPhones were the new hotness and weren't officially available in Singapore yet, I remember seeing a plethora of "jPhones", "iFones", "iPhons" ...


6

Quoting this, this, and this: External disks are no different that internal disks, in terms of media and components. Laptops have been going through X-Ray machines for decades without incident, so I see no issue with external drives doing the same safely.


6

In general the way it works is that you pay duty when you import something permanently to a country. If you are visiting a country, you generally do not pay import duty on something you are bringing in temporarily. That's why you don't have to pay duty on things you bring with you when you visit a country as a tourist. The issue is that they have to believe ...


6

I have flown from the USA to Thailand with computer monitors in my checked baggage without issue on a couple of recent occasions (and I use a roller duffel, so effectively zero protection against theft). Most thievery from luggage is small, easy to conceal items like jewelry, cameras, phones, tablets, music players. A big monitor in its original box is too ...


6

Wikipedia has an article on all plugs used in all countries, with a table for comparison. Or for a picture version (albeit comparing them to Australian plugs, but at least it shows you) - this will show you what they look like. Basically, international outlet/plug types A and C, and they run at 220V/50Hz. Coming from the Netherlands, you will need an ...


6

Very much depends on the cruise ship, and it's often based on their country of origin. Here are some examples: in the help of P&O cruises (a British-American cruise line) : Oceana and Britannia also have US 2 pin sockets in addition to UK 3 pin sockets The standard electrical supply in the United Kingdom is 50HZ (cycles) and 240V. The supply on board ...


6

Video game consoles are actually not very sensitive. Game discs or cartridges even less so. If you want to be safe, I'd do similar to what you said: carry on the two consoles (but not the cords, controllers, etc.) and the tablet. Everything else can be checked without much concern. Security will likely require the consoles and tablet to be removed from ...


5

Lithium batteries are a safety hazard as a thermal runaway can and has lead to fires. They are permitted in carry-on because if a fire starts, it can be fought and extinguished, as in this incident near Sydney. the Australian Transport Safety Bureau remarked in their investigation: In the meantime, the ATSB stressed, "this event reinforces the importance ...


5

The rule here is that Laptops are not subject to Customs however the quantities must not be of a commercial nature. Whether five laptops constitutes commercial quantities is basically subject to the Customs Officer's discretion. However you will have a very difficult time getting Customs to believe that you need five laptops for personal and/or work use. ...


4

I watch Border Security, which shows Canadian border officials at land crossings and airports. They show the officers in secondary looking through people's phones very frequently. (Typically their lies fall apart because they have all these texts and emails about what they are going to do when they get to Canada, and once shown these emails or texts they ...


4

Disclaimer Please note that what you are doing is illegal, as you are effectively importing goods in the country, trying to pass them as personal items which you had on you when you left the USA. This is clearly not the case as you said you bought the item in India and are bringing it in with you in the USA. Moreover, the fact that you put the box in the ...


4

There are cases of customs and immigration demanding the passwords to phones or laptops, and then taking them out of sight of the passenger to use them and search them. Apparently by law you must provide these passwords when asked, and you may not follow the officers around to see what they do with your devices (such as putting USB sticks into them to copy ...


3

Due to safety concerns, IATA issues guidelines concerning the transport of lithium batteries, which airlines will likely enforce. (In a worst case scenario, a lithium battery could spontaneously explode and cause a fire in the cargo hold, which is inaccessible to humans during the flight.) The Lithium Battery Guidance Document for 2015 states (emphasis ...


3

Keep in mind that customs is not your only concern. Due to safety concerns, IATA issues guidelines concerning the transport of lithium batteries, which airlines will likely enforce. (In a worst case scenario, a lithium battery could spontaneously explode and cause a fire in the cargo hold, which is inaccessible to humans during the flight.) The Lithium ...


3

The original invoice or receipt showing that you or your company purchased it in the UK would be best. This way you can prove the laptop is personal belongings you originally owned in the UK and thus exempt from duty and Import VAT.


3

Avoid doing this and you will be safe :) Voltage won't be a problem. Still remember to check if travelling for other countries outside Europe. a few mobile and laptop chargers should not be a problem connected on the same power strip. Still, if you're planning to hook more devices be carefull with the itensity (and this is where you can screw up with too ...


3

The obvious choices to get your electronics are: Sim Lim Square Funan Digitalife Mall Singapore While they do sell the big brands as you noticed, you should be able to also find no-name products for quite cheap. For instance I've been able to find generic iMac chargers at Sim Lim for a good price. Those malls are organised in a lot of small shops, so ...


3

There is no limit on buying duty free items, but there are limits on how much you can bring in duty free when you come home to the UK. As far as Hong Kong is concerned you can buy as much as you please. The limits on importing items into the UK will be per person, so you and your girlfriend each get an allotted amount and if you exceed that amount then ...


3

If you read the description of the rules on importing goods from outside the EU on the official website, you will notice that: To qualify for the tax/duty free allowances you also need to meet the following conditions: You must transport the goods yourself. The goods must be for your own use or as a gift. So duty-free allowances in the EU ...



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