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35

There's no mention of electronic boards etc in the TSA prohibited items list. So provided they aren't so heavy as to be a potential "blunt instrument" weapon, you should be ok. If they're in original packaging, that might help. Of course, they don't have to let any items through, restricted list or not. You may also wish to check the website of your ...


23

Get a European USB Charger I would buy a USB charger with a European plug (image courtesy of aliexpress): Travel Convenient EU Plug Wall USB Charger Adapter For Samsung Galaxy S5 S4 S3 Note 3 by Ali Express, fair use It beats the weight of your US charger plus a plug adapter, it's cheap a as dirt (2-something bucks on eBay), it can be used for all your ...


22

Against your insurer, perhaps, no chance of extracting compensation from BA: 8f) Fragile or perishable items must not be packed in baggage checked into the hold You must not include in your checked baggage fragile or perishable items or items of special value such as: money jewellery precious metals computers personal electronic ...


16

External drives (or internal ones - same drive, different case) will have zero problems with commercial air travel. X-rays don't affect them, and any in-flight vibrations capable of damaging a disk drive will also destroy the airplane. Now that's assuming it's turned off. Running drives don't like to be knocked around, but that applies on your desk too. As ...


14

I question your premise. Take the 15" Macbook pro with retina display. Price in U.K. is GBP 1332.00 + 267 VAT = USD 2035.00 + VAT (using exchange rate today) Price in U.S. is USD 1999.00 + State sales tax. So the difference in pre-tax price is less than 2%. The apparent price difference is mostly your country's tax. If you buy it at retail, say in New ...


14

Building on Calchas' comment, my coworkers and I have carried large, odd-looking electronic research equipment onto international flights on numerous occasions, on different airlines, departing from and passing through different airports. We have never had a problem. Usually, bags containing such equipment are given extra screening; security will pull us ...


12

Yes, Commissioners of HMRC have broad and ancient powers to seize goods they suspect are illegally imported. In this case, unless you can satisfy HMRC that you were not importing the item, you will have to pay a fine and the appropriate duty and VAT on the item. I am not sure I agree with Relaxed's post, I think in this circumstance the item might be ...


12

Your case is quite simple: If the flight costs 500 Dollars, and shipping costs 400 dollars, then choose the latter option, as it saves you 100 dollars. For commercially imported goods, there is no duty free allowance anyway, so you end up paying the same amount of customs for both options. However, since you got these watches quite cheaply, be prepared to ...


9

On your way to where you live in France, when you stopped in Germany, customs asked you questions about your electronics and you told them what you told us - that you had lived in France for 2 years, and bought all these items in the US a year and a half ago. They asked you if you had declared them and paid import duties, and you said no. They then imposed ...


8

I have flown from the USA to Thailand with computer monitors in my checked baggage without issue on a couple of recent occasions (and I use a roller duffel, so effectively zero protection against theft). Most thievery from luggage is small, easy to conceal items like jewelry, cameras, phones, tablets, music players. A big monitor in its original box is too ...


8

Yes, I checked with the consulate security, They said we can carry them, but we cannot use them during the interview. However, you can use them when you are waiting in the lobby.


8

Video game consoles are actually not very sensitive. Game discs or cartridges even less so. If you want to be safe, I'd do similar to what you said: carry on the two consoles (but not the cords, controllers, etc.) and the tablet. Everything else can be checked without much concern. Security will likely require the consoles and tablet to be removed from ...


7

There are cases of customs and immigration demanding the passwords to phones or laptops, and then taking them out of sight of the passenger to use them and search them. Apparently by law you must provide these passwords when asked, and you may not follow the officers around to see what they do with your devices (such as putting USB sticks into them to copy ...


7

No, they don't. Security looks for weapons and bombs; if it's not either, they're not interested. Of course, there's always the off chance that you'll run into some particularly zealous and clued-in inspector with a fetish for lithium batteries, but realistically I wouldn't worry about it. Also, 90% of the regulation you link to is about transporting ...


6

Quoting this, this, and this: External disks are no different that internal disks, in terms of media and components. Laptops have been going through X-Ray machines for decades without incident, so I see no issue with external drives doing the same safely.


6

In general the way it works is that you pay duty when you import something permanently to a country. If you are visiting a country, you generally do not pay import duty on something you are bringing in temporarily. That's why you don't have to pay duty on things you bring with you when you visit a country as a tourist. The issue is that they have to believe ...


6

Very much depends on the cruise ship, and it's often based on their country of origin. Here are some examples: in the help of P&O cruises (a British-American cruise line) : Oceana and Britannia also have US 2 pin sockets in addition to UK 3 pin sockets The standard electrical supply in the United Kingdom is 50HZ (cycles) and 240V. The supply on board ...


6

Wikipedia has an article on all plugs used in all countries, with a table for comparison. Or for a picture version (albeit comparing them to Australian plugs, but at least it shows you) - this will show you what they look like. Basically, international outlet/plug types A and C, and they run at 220V/50Hz. Coming from the Netherlands, you will need an ...


6

keeping them sealed in the original packaging might help too, with receipt and original packaging it is easy to explain what it does if the question arises.


5

The best practice is not to keep sensitive and/or business critical data in a portable computer or device. The hard drive could fail anytime, the computer would be lost, broken, stolen. The best scenario is to host the data on any secure counter or server, which would be accessed either thought a VPN as @BurhanKhalid suggested or to be put somewhere in the ...


5

The rule here is that Laptops are not subject to Customs however the quantities must not be of a commercial nature. Whether five laptops constitutes commercial quantities is basically subject to the Customs Officer's discretion. However you will have a very difficult time getting Customs to believe that you need five laptops for personal and/or work use. ...


5

In 2009, in an act of stupidity, corruption and bad faith, the brazilian governament created a new standard that's different from all other countries in the world: This image shows the brazillian standard at the bottom and the number of countries (paĆ­ses, in red) that use each other standard. That said, it is still very common to find the american ...


4

Disclaimer Please note that what you are doing is illegal, as you are effectively importing goods in the country, trying to pass them as personal items which you had on you when you left the USA. This is clearly not the case as you said you bought the item in India and are bringing it in with you in the USA. Moreover, the fact that you put the box in the ...


4

India has a 230V 50Hz (voltage of 230 Volts, frequency of 50 Hertz) system. Therefore any electronics purchased for a country with this voltage and frequency will obviously work. However the situation in reality is much better than this. Almost all modern electronics is designed to work with a wide range of AC input voltages and frequencies, because they ...


4

I once travelled with two consoles in my hand luggage while moving between countries. The most sensitive piece of the assembly are in my opinion the controllers. Anyhow if you can, take both console and controllers in your hand luggage, and leave the games in your checked piece. Should you be forced to check everything in, you can wrap each item ...


4

To answer your first question, yes they do random checks on laptops and disks, but this is rare. In my last 15 years I only had it once. They suspected some CDs on me and checked them, they also opened my laptop and searched for photos! That's it. They are usually targeting porn content. Regarding the internet access, no, there is nothing that will surprise ...


4

Yes, you have to declare it. Here is the form. There is no ambiguity ("including gifts for someone else" or "will remain in the U.S." covers either situation of you being resident or not). I'm not a customs broker (so E&OE), but the harmonized tariff code for iPhones appears to be 8517.12.0050, which would appear to be free of duty. Your friend may ...


4

While they might detain it until you have paid all applicable duties and taxes, customs officers are not primarily interested in seizing goods that can be imported legally. That's what happens to illegal drugs, weapons, some foodstuff or counterfeit goods. For a laptop, if found out, you would be slammed with a significant tax bill (mostly VAT, some duty as ...


4

Adding an answer from personal experience... I purchased a laptop on a trip to California in 2012. When I returned to the UK, I went through the 'red path' and showed it to the inspector along with about GBP 400 of other stuff I had purchased. The other stuff was generic, like clothes and some USB sticks and what-not. The inspector typed something into ...


4

(iPhone user here) (personal experience) I use my usb adapter directly plugged in to the wall to charge my iPhone in Europe (France, Italy and Spain) The Samsung S3 charger should directly support 110v/220v, you only need a plug adapter which is really small and really cheap.



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