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24

For hotel rooms there is an easy solution: It is called the "hotel safe". Earnestly, do not store important valuables in hotel rooms. Even cheap hotels have very likely a cupboard which is under constant supervision at least at daytime. If you have a rented apartment you have another situation. Burglars and thieves have the following mindset: Break in as ...


21

One of the most effective measures I use frequently when travelling is Kensington lock. It's very likely your laptop already has the appropriate slot, so you need to buy the chain and that's about it. I lock my laptop at any rented place I stay, even if it's a reputable hotel -- no need to take any chances. The cable should fit easily in your hand baggage. ...


20

I used to 'get around this' technicality by asking at the info desks at airports where there might be a power point to charge my laptop etc, even if I'd spotted some. They'd usually helpfully point out one, or say 'oh just use any you find'. That way I figured I'd be able to argue being covered if it came down to security yelling at me or worse. I've also ...


15

It's not theft. Unless otherwise noted, intentionally blocked, or obviously intended for some other purpose (e.g. to plug in an ATM), the outlets in the waiting area are specifically there for passenger convenience. In fact, airliners and airports are specifically expanding this functionality for more people to take advantage of; Omaha's Eppley Airfield ...


14

Disclaimer: IANAL Allegedly if CBP officers find something clearly marked as "business confidential", they may not proceed without authorization of higher-ups. Guidelines have been described in document DoHS's document "Privacy Impact Assessment: CBP and ICE Border Searches of Electronic Devices". Seems that according to this if CBP officers would ...


10

A random search of your computers seems very unlikely but what I read also suggests that you have basically no legal recourse against it should it happen. The only workable solution I am aware of is to upload the data somewhere and then download it once you are in the US. Of course, this creates all sorts of new security issues (how to secure the transfer ...


9

If you do take it and store it in the hold, I'd suggest removing the harddrive. You don't want that bashed around by other suitcases. Taking it as carry-on - as long as it fits in their luggage dimensions (the airline you're using will have this on their website) and is under their weight restrictions (you sure it weighs less than 8kg?), then there's no ...


9

All "normal" mains power supplies should be OK. Most 'universal' supplies will work down to 90 VAC. Most switch mode supplies convert the AC to DC and then deal with that. You can find exotic systems - but not in normal use. Maybe shipboard or aircraft in extreme cases - but nothing that they would supply to members of the public. Rarely in "out of the ...


8

To add to Josh B's answer - Wan Chai Computer Centre. Wan Chai MTR Station, Exit A4 on to the pedestrian bridge, there will be escalators when you hit the main road to let you get down to street level. It is right next to a McDonalds (you can see that sign from the bridge). Less busy than the rest, good range. Mong Kok Computer Centre. Mong Kok MTR Station ...


8

According to Wikipedia, the minimal voltage is 100 V in Japan and the maximum voltage 240 V in several countries. As for the frequency, they all lie between 50-60 Hz. So there isn't any country with such an exotic voltage or frequency that wouldn't fit the range you mentioned. If you think of it, it wouldn't make sense for a small country to go too far ...


7

According to the Sleeping in Airports review, you can charge for a fee at Terminal 1, Boarding Area B near Gate 23 Terminal 3, Boarding Area E near Gate 61 Terminal 3, Boarding Area F near Gate 87 You might find free plugs elsewhere, but if you're desperate head on over and get charged up, then do more looking.


7

Not the same scale, but generally people head to two particular shopping centres: Funan DigitalLife Mall & Sim Lim Square. View inside Sim Lim Square by hippietrail Funan is more upmarket than Sim Lim, which caters more to the general populous. The downside is that there are quite a few ongoing scams at some of the stores in these centres. Some of ...


7

In most airports or trains stations, you can buy a multi-adaptor. They let you switch between almost any country, except South Africa, usually, as it's a ginormous plug. Example: Alternatively, look at the link that Andra commented on with, where you could look into a powerstrip with different source plugs that you could adapt to. However, I figure ...


7

If you'd accept a calculation, rather than requiring potentially expensive equipment to measure it, there's a website that does that for you: Calculate the dose received From one of their document pages: Generally, detectors only provide correct readings for some of these particles. To obtain a correct measurement, it is necessary to use a series ...


7

This page provides an excellent overview of radiation types and what you are most liable to encounter. For airline flights gamma-radiation is the most probable type. (Alpha particles are stopped by paper, Beta by thin foil or similar. You can buy commercial instruments that will detect radiation for from about $200 on up. An off the shelf "PIN diode" ...


7

It's not as important as the power requirement. From a piece on Wikitravel: Frequency is generally not a problem--most travel items will work on either 50 or 60 Hz. If all the electrical appliance does is produce heat or light (except fluorescent lighting), then the frequency is unlikely to matter. However, I assume you're talking about a laptop ...


6

Have you tried the Tumi adapter kit...? http://www.tumi.com/product/index.jsp?productId=4209721 $ 50 may seem expensive, but it's never let me down. You can also look for cheaper alternatives if you search for "Universal Adapter Kits".


6

The US Treasury has published guidelines regarding imports from Iran, which read as follows: IMPORTS FROM IRAN - Goods or services of Iranian origin may not be imported into the United States, either directly or through third countries, with the following exceptions: a) Gifts valued at $100 or less; b) Information and informational ...


6

As always, Wikipedia has a good list which can answer this question. See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mains_electricity_by_country which has info, specs, and pictures for each plug type by country. It looks like Chile and Argentina have different mains plug types and you may only need an adapter for Argentina.


6

I have travelled quite a lot on both cheap and expensive flights and have never witnessed or heard about theft on the flights, even the cheapest of low-cost flights, although that doesn't mean it doesn't happen. I have, however, sometimes wondered the same thing when travelling long-haul to notorious destinations like Mexico/Colombia. Things I have ...


5

Also, I should note that it's not the data, it's the hardware cost I'm worried about (nothing spectacular, about $2000, but still) Are there any other ways to keep my laptop safe at home besides Kensington lock? To mitigate the hardware cost in case of theft, ensure that you're traveling with property insurance. Homeowner's or renter's insurance ...


5

Apple claims the 2013 version of MacBook Air has battery that can last up to 12 hours. (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=MacBook_Air&oldid=577817487) A test performed by The Verge, for example, found Apple's claim to be accurate, with the laptop running for 13 hours and 29 minutes while "[cycling] through a series of websites and images at 65 ...


5

One possibility is to do a full drive encryption with some software like TrueCrypt. You can then store the key on a USB drive and have someone you trust send it to you once you make it across the border. This way you are physically not able to decrypt the computer if asked/forced to. Make sure the thumb drive only gets sent to you once you're safely across ...


5

In Chile, ungrounded plugs are compatible with Europlugs, so you should be able to use the Swiss plug directly. Some sockets only accept grounded plugs, which have a round grounding pin directly between the two round power pins. Apparently similar plugs are used in Italy, but I had never seen an adapter for it before I came to Chile. I have no recollection ...


5

There are basically three places your possessions can be during the flight: in a bag in the overhead compartment. In theory, someone could keep track of which bags belong to which passenger, and when you're asleep or away from your seat, pull down your bag, remove an item, put it in their bag and replace your bag before you return. This is insanely risky ...


5

I had a similar but not identical issue with a French Wii U in Japan - it also uses an external, non-switching supply, but as France is 220V and Japan is 100V I needed a step up transformer. To take your questions: Yes, Beijing is 220V 50Hz. No, the frequency difference won't cause any issues (this only really affects timing circuits) 200W is plenty as ...


4

Three approaches: choose an airline that has in-seat power. get a sheet battery - the one I have for my Windows laptop adds another 7 hours or so - that attaches to the laptop and doesn't look external, so you can use it in place get an external battery and take a break for a little while to let it do its charging under your seat or somewhere the crew ...


4

In general airlines will go out of their way to tell you if the plane you are currently on has Wifi/Internet Access - as that's how they make their money out of wifi! How they do this varies between airlines, but generally includes : Brochures/cards in the seat-back pocket telling you how to connect Wifi logos on the plane, either at the boarding door ...



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