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16

Seems unlikely it's anything more than normal electrostatic discharge. The fact that it only affects you could be related to your clothes or shoes (especially if they are made of synthetic fibers). I also wonder whether the moving conveyor belt could be acting as a Van de Graff generator. Do you not get shocks like that under other circumstances? (I live ...


14

The fourth line of text on the device (counting those two lines on the top right) says: EINGANG 230V~50Hz 4W where 'Eingang' is German for 'input', '230V~50Hz' means '230Volts AC at 50Hz' and 4W is the maximum power. Since the US mains have a voltage of 120V and a frequency of 60Hz, you will need a transformer, but then the device will work.


14

External drives (or internal ones - same drive, different case) will have zero problems with commercial air travel. X-rays don't affect them, and any in-flight vibrations capable of damaging a disk drive will also destroy the airplane. Now that's assuming it's turned off. Running drives don't like to be knocked around, but that applies on your desk too. As ...


13

As I understand it, lithium batteries are not permitted to be carried aboard if there is any possibility of the contacts being shorted out in transit (this can lead to excessive current draw, heat, and possibly fire or even explosion). If the battery is inside your laptop, it is considered protected against accidental short. If a battery is carried outside ...


11

Yes, the regulations did change both in the US and in Europe. There is an older question about using a Kindle on flights, where I recently added an answer explaining the change of rules of both the FAA and the EASA. For your specific case with Swiss, the change by the EASA is responsible. Their press release states: The EU's Aviation Safety Agency ...


10

All "normal" mains power supplies should be OK. Most 'universal' supplies will work down to 90 VAC. Most switch mode supplies convert the AC to DC and then deal with that. You can find exotic systems - but not in normal use. Maybe shipboard or aircraft in extreme cases - but nothing that they would supply to members of the public. Rarely in "out of the ...


8

According to Wikipedia, the minimal voltage is 100 V in Japan and the maximum voltage 240 V in several countries. As for the frequency, they all lie between 50-60 Hz. So there isn't any country with such an exotic voltage or frequency that wouldn't fit the range you mentioned. If you think of it, it wouldn't make sense for a small country to go too far ...


8

There is a EUR 430 allowance but it's explicitly for goods “having no commercial character”. So if you want to sell them, you're not OK, no matter their value. Incidentally, even a single brand new Apple Mac Book for your own use would not be OK either because it would be over the limit (bringing back your own used laptop is a different question). It was a ...


8

Yes, I checked with the consulate security, They said we can carry them, but we cannot use them during the interview. However, you can use them when you are waiting in the lobby.


7

It's not as important as the power requirement. From a piece on Wikitravel: Frequency is generally not a problem--most travel items will work on either 50 or 60 Hz. If all the electrical appliance does is produce heat or light (except fluorescent lighting), then the frequency is unlikely to matter. However, I assume you're talking about a laptop ...


7

This page provides an excellent overview of radiation types and what you are most liable to encounter. For airline flights gamma-radiation is the most probable type. (Alpha particles are stopped by paper, Beta by thin foil or similar. You can buy commercial instruments that will detect radiation for from about $200 on up. An off the shelf "PIN diode" ...


7

Customs usually wants to know the following things: Did you buy it while abroad? Is it coming TO this country, or THROUGH this country? Is it intended for resale? Is it worth their time? A new MacBook in a box brought back by a resident would satisfy 1-4. 2kg of baby wipes, opened, would stop at #3. A MacBook not in a box would probably pass as used and ...


7

I've done this all over the world without incident. Just make sure your devices are ok with the voltage coming from the wall, and that you're not throwing away grounding protection by using a two prong adapter instead of one with a grounding strip. To check voltages, I use Wikipedia. In your case Spain and the UK are on the same voltage, so that's not an ...


6

In Chile, ungrounded plugs are compatible with Europlugs, so you should be able to use the Swiss plug directly. Some sockets only accept grounded plugs, which have a round grounding pin directly between the two round power pins. Apparently similar plugs are used in Italy, but I had never seen an adapter for it before I came to Chile. I have no recollection ...


6

As always, Wikipedia has a good list which can answer this question. See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mains_electricity_by_country which has info, specs, and pictures for each plug type by country. It looks like Chile and Argentina have different mains plug types and you may only need an adapter for Argentina.


6

There are basically three places your possessions can be during the flight: in a bag in the overhead compartment. In theory, someone could keep track of which bags belong to which passenger, and when you're asleep or away from your seat, pull down your bag, remove an item, put it in their bag and replace your bag before you return. This is insanely risky ...


6

I have travelled quite a lot on both cheap and expensive flights and have never witnessed or heard about theft on the flights, even the cheapest of low-cost flights, although that doesn't mean it doesn't happen. I have, however, sometimes wondered the same thing when travelling long-haul to notorious destinations like Mexico/Colombia. Things I have ...


6

Not sure where you've been reading that, but I can assure you they're quite wrong, Sim Lim Square sells every make of cheap electronics, so Chinese no-name brands and outright ripoffs are legion. Back in the day when iPhones were the new hotness and weren't officially available in Singapore yet, I remember seeing a plethora of "jPhones", "iFones", "iPhons" ...


6

While certainly not as good as Nate Eldrege's answer, I have a fairly simple solution for dealing with shocks. Whenever I determine that something is a source of electrostatic discharge, I always put my hand into a fist and discharge with the bottom of my fist (ie: the opposite side that your thumb is on). Tuck your thumb into your closed fist under your ...


6

In general the way it works is that you pay duty when you import something permanently to a country. If you are visiting a country, you generally do not pay import duty on something you are bringing in temporarily. That's why you don't have to pay duty on things you bring with you when you visit a country as a tourist. The issue is that they have to believe ...


6

I have flown from the USA to Thailand with computer monitors in my checked baggage without issue on a couple of recent occasions (and I use a roller duffel, so effectively zero protection against theft). Most thievery from luggage is small, easy to conceal items like jewelry, cameras, phones, tablets, music players. A big monitor in its original box is too ...


5

You may be better off with a 220V certified rated charger, rather than converter. They should be freely interchangeable with 110V ones, as long as toothbrush is concerned. For Sonicare: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Philips-Sonicare-FlexCare-Toothbrush-Genuine/dp/B00DGTGTXY For Waterpik: http://waterpikukonline.co.uk/replacement-parts/wp-450-chargers The ...


5

I had a similar but not identical issue with a French Wii U in Japan - it also uses an external, non-switching supply, but as France is 220V and Japan is 100V I needed a step up transformer. To take your questions: Yes, Beijing is 220V 50Hz. No, the frequency difference won't cause any issues (this only really affects timing circuits) 200W is plenty as ...


5

Quoting this, this, and this: External disks are no different that internal disks, in terms of media and components. Laptops have been going through X-Ray machines for decades without incident, so I see no issue with external drives doing the same safely.


4

In addition to codinghands's answer, for point 3, my experience in Guangdong suggest the outlets are usually universal. Anyway, a travel adapter should solve the outlet problem for you. As a side note, console games have been banned in China since the 2000s until 2013. People in China had managed to play on imported consoles with appropriate PSU and adapter ...


4

I watch Border Security, which shows Canadian border officials at land crossings and airports. They show the officers in secondary looking through people's phones very frequently. (Typically their lies fall apart because they have all these texts and emails about what they are going to do when they get to Canada, and once shown these emails or texts they ...


4

You would rather need a 220 to a 110 converter. I have been using this converter(on a daily basis for over a month now) in Australia (India and Australia have the same voltage/power levels I am told) and all my US appliances work well. It has a little bit of a fan noise in a very quiet room, but that doesn't bother me. Also, you need this only if your ...


4

Lithium batteries are a safety hazard as a thermal runaway can and has lead to fires. They are permitted in carry-on because if a fire starts, it can be fought and extinguished, as in this incident near Sydney. the Australian Transport Safety Bureau remarked in their investigation: In the meantime, the ATSB stressed, "this event reinforces the importance ...


4

Disclaimer Please note that what you are doing is illegal, as you are effectively importing goods in the country, trying to pass them as personal items which you had on you when you left the USA. This is clearly not the case as you said you bought the item in India and are bringing it in with you in the USA. Moreover, the fact that you put the box in the ...


4

There are cases of customs and immigration demanding the passwords to phones or laptops, and then taking them out of sight of the passenger to use them and search them. Apparently by law you must provide these passwords when asked, and you may not follow the officers around to see what they do with your devices (such as putting USB sticks into them to copy ...



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