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23

For reference: The 15" MacBook Pro carries a 99.5 watt hour battery. The 13" MacBook Pro carries a 74.9 watt hour battery. The MacBook Air 13" carries a 54 watt hour battery. The MacBook carries a 41.4 watt hour battery. The 12" iPad Pro carries a 38.5 watt hour battery. The MacBook Air 11" carries a 38 watt hour battery. The 9.7" iPad Pro carries a 27.5 ...


8

According to the United States FAA, lithium-ion batteries are allowed in checked baggage so long as they are in a consumer electronic device and they are not too large. The FAA has separate regulations about "portable electronic devices, containing batteries" and "lithium ion and lithium metal batteries, spare (uninstalled)". For the former: Most ...


5

In this answer, I've cited the IATA guidelines, which most airlines will likely follow (though deviations are possible). In summary, you should be fine if your computer's unremovable battery is up to 160 Wh. Current MacBook Pros (as of 2016) should be under 100 Wh. The Lithium Battery Guidance Document for 2015 states (emphasis added): Passenger ...


4

UK answer. Recently refurbished long distance trains tend to have sockets in the seating areas for the passengers touse, these are usually these are often labelled something like "laptops and mobile phones only" reflecting their intended use. Local trains and older trains are less likely to have them. There is no charge for using them. The sockets are ...


4

Generally, new and longer-distance trains will, older suburban ones won't. Quite a few have them in first class, but not in standard. CrossCountry Voyager trains have power available in most seats, and a nice seating plan: Seating Plan East Midland have power on their 'Meridian' trains but not their HSTs - link South West Trains don't generally - it ...


3

You're unlikely to find a place to rent a laptop anywhere in the city, as that's not something most people are interested in. However it shouldn't be to hard to get a used laptop from the local Craigslist. Prices start from $100, depending on condition.


3

As I understand it there are various categories of device that people use when taking equipment abroad. Plug adaptors simply convert the type of the plug, they do not change voltage. So they can only be used if the device is compatible with the voltage of the destination country. Thyrister or Triac based converters, work in a similar way to a lighting ...


3

It's not much of a "quarter" but this map suggests there's a few stores between the 5th and 11th wards, with more a little bit scattered around. This listing suggests there's a few to be found in a block between 50th and 50th lower street, around Sule Pagoda, as far west as Bo Ywe Road. Very few of these actually have websites (though some list a phone ...


3

At the end I decided to visit "Camera Street" in Taipei (location here), which is basically a crossroad where both the crossing streets are full of photography-shops and... No, the prices are definitely different from the western ones (if you say specifically that you are not going to need the warranty). My advice is to enter more than a couple of shops and ...


3

Depending on how flat your batteries are. If my laptop closed down from lack of power and I restart it, it typically lights up for a second, maybe even displays the IBM screen and then dies down again. The battery symbol will be orange (signalling low power) during that entire time. In the unlikely (that has so far not happened to me, and I have to think ...


3

Airport security officers may, randomly, ask that you turn on electronic devices (usually do something to activate the display) to show that they are functional. To do this, the battery must not be completely discharged. If you are unable to turn on the device, they may not allow you to bring the electronic device through the checkpoint and you would have to ...


2

Ideally you should check with the all airlines and involved and the security administrations of all airports you go through. However that's easier said than done. In practice this is a relic of the distant past and a complete non-issue. US security (TSA) has stopped this practice many years ago. Over the last 5 years I've flown 500k+ miles in 20+ countries ...


2

Adding to the answer of @chx (+1), I have traveled within Europe as recently as January 2016 with 2-3 external hard drives (and some other electronics) in my carry-on and while it did win me a selection for the explosives test, there was no problem whatsoever and security staff was very chill about it.


2

A lot of threads on both Tripadvisor and Flyertalk confirms there is no problem. Even a less than a year old thread on 10-12 hard drives have lots of reports of no problems. Photographer here who often does similar/the same: you're totally fine. I have had TSA ask me to power up my laptop and tablet but never a portable HD I've traveled with 3-...


1

These checks are usually done when traveling to the US (at least from Kuwait and Dubai). I have yet to be asked to turn on my laptop when traveling to Europe, for example when transiting through Dubai; and the same when I flew to Malaysia (again, transiting through Dubai).


1

The chances of you being asked about a laptop is near to zero. I have travelled in and out of the US hundreds of times with two laptops, an iPad, two iPhones, iPod, headphones, disk drives, digital cameras... the only thing they have ever looked at was the drives looking for kiddy / animal / snuff porn. I've brought almost brand new electronics from my ...



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