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24

For hotel rooms there is an easy solution: It is called the "hotel safe". Earnestly, do not store important valuables in hotel rooms. Even cheap hotels have very likely a cupboard which is under constant supervision at least at daytime. If you have a rented apartment you have another situation. Burglars and thieves have the following mindset: Break in as ...


21

One of the most effective measures I use frequently when travelling is Kensington lock. It's very likely your laptop already has the appropriate slot, so you need to buy the chain and that's about it. I lock my laptop at any rented place I stay, even if it's a reputable hotel -- no need to take any chances. The cable should fit easily in your hand baggage. ...


20

Technically, they are not permitted in-flight. Bluetooth is a form of wireless communication, and all wireless communication is banned during airborne operations by the FCC and the FAA. As mentioned by @AnkurBanerjee in this post, FAA Advisory Circular 91.21-1B covers this regulation.


20

I used to 'get around this' technicality by asking at the info desks at airports where there might be a power point to charge my laptop etc, even if I'd spotted some. They'd usually helpfully point out one, or say 'oh just use any you find'. That way I figured I'd be able to argue being covered if it came down to security yelling at me or worse. I've also ...


17

There are essentially two ways to check if your appliance or its charger work on 220V. Usually the fine print on the adapter will give the range, saying something like: "Rated input:AC 100-240V". If the voltage of the country falls in the range specified, you will be fine. If you can't find the voltage on the charger, try downloading the instruction manual ...


16

One of the simplest, cleanest and cheapest solutions that I've seen is a couple I met who were travelling around South America. They'd back up onto a second SD card as well. When a card was full, they'd simply put it in an envelope and mail it home. Very cheap and very easy, and pretty reliable. Send it registered mail if you don't trust it. Once their ...


16

Millions of smartphones and 10's (if not 100's) of thousands of Kindles/E-book readers go through airport scanners every day. So far I believe the number that have apparently been damaged by airport scanner stands at about 2 for Kindle, and I've never heard of a smartphone being damaged by any form of scanners. (And in the case of the Kindles there's ...


15

Don't pack anything. You'll find much cheaper, and probably better, plug adapters all over India. Expect to pay Rs 15-30 for simple ones that just accommodate US-style plugs, and Rs 40-50 for full universal ones. You can find them at any general store/convenience store in major cities and tourist locations, but might get a better selection at electrician's ...


15

It's not theft. Unless otherwise noted, intentionally blocked, or obviously intended for some other purpose (e.g. to plug in an ATM), the outlets in the waiting area are specifically there for passenger convenience. In fact, airliners and airports are specifically expanding this functionality for more people to take advantage of; Omaha's Eppley Airfield ...


14

From the US Customs and Border patrol website: As Secretary Chertoff noted in a recent op-ed, "Of the approximately 400 million travelers who entered the country last year, only a tiny percentage were referred to secondary baggage inspection…[and] of those, only a fraction had electronic devices that may have been checked." So, (if they are being ...


14

When power outlets were first installed on airliners, they used a special adapter called EmPower, which looked like this: The airlines obviously thought that frequent flyers would be happy to buy a new kind of adapter for all their gizmos. This turned out not to be entirely true... nobody wanted to buy these new stupid adapters, and the airlines ...


14

X Rays don't penetrate metal. Circuit boards have a lot of metal and solder, making it easy to conceal items within. If the TSA can't see it, they get nervous. Hence the 'take out your laptop.' (Why they don't require that of iPads, I don't know.) Now, all this being said, you can get bags that have laptop compartments. The only requirement is that ...


14

Disclaimer: IANAL Allegedly if CBP officers find something clearly marked as "business confidential", they may not proceed without authorization of higher-ups. Guidelines have been described in document DoHS's document "Privacy Impact Assessment: CBP and ICE Border Searches of Electronic Devices". Seems that according to this if CBP officers would ...


12

To tackle the second part of your question first, we have previously covered this ground on WiFi / 3G coverage in Europe in the following questions: Are there companies that offer worldwide WiFi roaming for a fixed fee? (I might also point out specifically here to look at FON, linked to by Andra in the question itself, in addition to the answers.) Is there ...


11

GPS devices do not have an active transmitter (for devices that don't go online to fetch map data, that is); they work by calculating time signals broadcast at low power by a constellation of satellites. Since there's no active transmitter and GPS signals are broadcast anyway (modern aircraft navigation systems do use GPS onboard), a watch or a camera ...


11

I agree with @R.. I spent over four months in Delhi in 2009, and while I did bring over a couple of plug adapters with me, it's much easier and cheaper to just buy them there. Any market will have them. (Just remember that the price of almost anything in India is negotiable!) In addition to buying a couple of plug adapters, you can also purchase a universal ...


11

I think there are two views here. Firstly, the backpacker as we know it is changing, or splitting. There are still the 'true', 'hardcore' backpackers, who want to hitchhike everywhere with two pairs of socks and three shirts and a sleeping roll on their back. That's great, but it's not for everyone. As hostels become more ubiquitous, wifi appears ...


10

It's very hard to make a universal socket that's compliant with all the safety standards that would apply. Eg in the UK BS 1363 sockets must have shutters over the L and N holes and plugs must be fused. The simple answer, if you are travelling to many countries, is often to take your domestic power strip but change the plug on it to a IEC 60320 inlet. This ...


10

I don't know about a specific Kindle version, but if I have a limited number of destinations with some long WikiTravel articles, I just save the pages: Option 1, in Google's Chrome browser open the print preview and then save the page as PDF, then just copy that PDF to your Kindle, it's okay in vertical screen rotation and very readable in horizontal. ...


10

A random search of your computers seems very unlikely but what I read also suggests that you have basically no legal recourse against it should it happen. The only workable solution I am aware of is to upload the data somewhere and then download it once you are in the US. Of course, this creates all sorts of new security issues (how to secure the transfer ...


9

I do see your point about the collaboration among people of different power types: (Yes, the rightmost plug is going through three adaptors. It's from 5 years ago, but I believe that one is mine. The picture was taken in South Africa: SA to UK adapters and UK to US adapters were plentiful, other combinations not so much. After that trip I started carrying ...


9

Indonesia uses European-style two-pin round plugs ('C'-type is the most common variant found): Voltage is at 220 V 50 Hz (as opposed to 110 V 60 Hz in US). Most modern electronic equipment that has auto-sensing capability should work without needing a voltage converter, you will need a plug adapter though which can buy cheap online. As for Apple products ...


9

I've used a good few of those fancy Toto do it all bidet sprayer dryer toilets, most of which (as the toilet isn't designed for a single gender) have the flush noise function. Department stores are a good bet, as are mid market restaurants. It's really nothing to write home about though. It's the sound of a flushing toilet, which I'm sure you've heard ...


9

If you do take it and store it in the hold, I'd suggest removing the harddrive. You don't want that bashed around by other suitcases. Taking it as carry-on - as long as it fits in their luggage dimensions (the airline you're using will have this on their website) and is under their weight restrictions (you sure it weighs less than 8kg?), then there's no ...


9

All "normal" mains power supplies should be OK. Most 'universal' supplies will work down to 90 VAC. Most switch mode supplies convert the AC to DC and then deal with that. You can find exotic systems - but not in normal use. Maybe shipboard or aircraft in extreme cases - but nothing that they would supply to members of the public. Rarely in "out of the ...


8

I went to India (from the US) last year and brought one of these. It's only an adapter, not a voltage converter. It will work with your laptop, phone charger, etc. if they support 110V and 220V. If you have devices (electric shaver, hair dryer, etc.) that only operate on 110V this won't work. Some "international" hotels will have a 110V outlet in the ...


8

Air Canada has power in economy. It is a standard North American plug. There was a brief time when in-air power required a special airline-only adapter, similar to the way headphones had that strange two-prong plug. But I think these days if there's power it will be a "normal" plug for that airline. The only adapter you are likely to need is one you would ...


8

Generally it's so that they can check the metal device that it is, and that nothing else is hidden in it. Same with SLR cameras on occasion, and I've been asked in the past to turn both of them on to prove they actually work. But generally they just want a clear and unobstructed view of all the workings, especially to see the harddisk platter. That caused ...


8

To keep connection with home I don't use fancy gadgets that could get stolen. I prefer instead:



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