Hot answers tagged

107

You don't have to be too worried about it, since the aircraft is able to cope with this. People are instructed to turn them off in order to avoid some disturbances and parasite noise in the communication between the pilot and the airport. As electronic devices using radio frequencies, they could also in theory cause some troubles to some aircraft equipment's ...


75

As a cabin crew member for long time, I can tell you that your responsibility ends by notifying a crew member, that's it. Let the crew members deal with it. This is true for all other violations, unless it's a life threatening situation that cannot wait, for example fire! Grab the extinguisher and fight the fire. But that's a whole different issue. ...


64

Do not worry, Wifi pass phrases for personal use should only be in printable ASCII characters, in other words English characters. They do not support Unicode or other codepages. For more details check the Wikipedia's Wi-Fi Protected Access page. Except if you are redirected to a webpage for authentication, that's a whole different story and Karlson's ...


36

There's no mention of electronic boards etc in the TSA prohibited items list. So provided they aren't so heavy as to be a potential "blunt instrument" weapon, you should be ok. If they're in original packaging, that might help. Of course, they don't have to let any items through, restricted list or not. You may also wish to check the website of your airline,...


32

I am a software engineer and I also test the software on many different smartphones and tablets. I fly frequently within Europe, so my answer will be limited to this area. However, this is also from west to east and east to west, outside of the Schengen region! As a Dutch citizen, I rarely need a visa to travel, which makes this easy. I do carry a lot of ...


29

For Android depending on the model of your phone you may have to add Russian Language to the available keyboards. I have Galaxy S5 and under Settings -> Languages and Input you should be able to do this from the Galaxy App Store. You should be able to do the same for the iPad just add a Russian Language, which will allow you to switch to it and make the ...


28

A few years ago I read a study about cell phone usage on U.S. domestic flights. Using RF locating equipment, they determined that the average U.S. flight has 2-3 cellphones left transmitting during the flight. Unconfirmed pilot anecdotes notwithstanding, if there were any significant risk of planes malfunctioning from cellphones, they would be falling out ...


27

I am Russian and I never met a WiFi password in Cyrillic.


26

Millions of smartphones and 10's (if not 100's) of thousands of Kindles/E-book readers go through airport scanners every day. So far I believe the number that have apparently been damaged by airport scanner stands at about 2 for Kindle, and I've never heard of a smartphone being damaged by any form of scanners. (And in the case of the Kindles there's ...


25

For hotel rooms there is an easy solution: It is called the "hotel safe". Earnestly, do not store important valuables in hotel rooms. Even cheap hotels have very likely a cupboard which is under constant supervision at least at daytime. If you have a rented apartment you have another situation. Burglars and thieves have the following mindset: Break in as ...


25

I frequently fly all over Europe with shoe-box PC's or various measuring devices in carry on luggage. The measuring equipment is very expensive: € 250.000 is pretty normal for a single device. You don't want to let it out of your sight or risk a baggage-handler to throw a suitcase around. And they don't like temperature fluctuations much (calibration issues)....


25

Your personal safety is not affected by your fellow passenger using a cellphone. In the US, the FCC (not the FAA!) has limited use of cellphones on aircraft because of the potential effect on cell towers on the ground. From an empirical standpoint, if there was a significant risk, it would have been observed many times by now as people frequently leave ...


24

X Rays don't penetrate metal. Circuit boards have a lot of metal and solder, making it easy to conceal items within. If the TSA can't see it, they get nervous. Hence the 'take out your laptop.' (Why they don't require that of iPads, I don't know.) Now, all this being said, you can get bags that have laptop compartments. The only requirement is that ...


24

Here's my take (please take with a grain of salt, it's based on general travel knowledge and not on any specific experiences like this): People travel with unusual equipment all the time. There's all kinds of scientific, industrial, professional audio, professional photography, etc. equipment, people do try and take all this expensive equipment in hand ...


23

Get a European USB Charger I would buy a USB charger with a European plug (image courtesy of aliexpress): Travel Convenient EU Plug Wall USB Charger Adapter For Samsung Galaxy S5 S4 S3 Note 3 by Ali Express, fair use It beats the weight of your US charger plus a plug adapter, it's cheap a as dirt (2-something bucks on eBay), it can be used for all your ...


23

For reference: The 15" MacBook Pro carries a 99.5 watt hour battery. The 13" MacBook Pro carries a 74.9 watt hour battery. The MacBook Air 13" carries a 54 watt hour battery. The MacBook carries a 41.4 watt hour battery. The 12" iPad Pro carries a 38.5 watt hour battery. The MacBook Air 11" carries a 38 watt hour battery. The 9.7" iPad Pro carries a 27.5 ...


22

Against your insurer, perhaps, no chance of extracting compensation from BA: 8f) Fragile or perishable items must not be packed in baggage checked into the hold You must not include in your checked baggage fragile or perishable items or items of special value such as: money jewellery precious metals computers personal electronic ...


21

Technically, they are not permitted in-flight. Bluetooth is a form of wireless communication, and all wireless communication is banned during airborne operations by the FCC and the FAA. As mentioned by @AnkurBanerjee in this post, FAA Advisory Circular 91.21-1B covers this regulation.


21

One of the most effective measures I use frequently when travelling is Kensington lock. It's very likely your laptop already has the appropriate slot, so you need to buy the chain and that's about it. I lock my laptop at any rented place I stay, even if it's a reputable hotel -- no need to take any chances. The cable should fit easily in your hand baggage. ...


21

Seems unlikely it's anything more than normal electrostatic discharge. The fact that it only affects you could be related to your clothes or shoes (especially if they are made of synthetic fibers). I also wonder whether the moving conveyor belt could be acting as a Van de Graff generator. Do you not get shocks like that under other circumstances? (I live ...


21

I question your premise. Take the 15" Macbook pro with retina display. Price in U.K. is GBP 1332.00 + 267 VAT = USD 2035.00 + VAT (using exchange rate today) Price in U.S. is USD 1999.00 + State sales tax. So the difference in pre-tax price is less than 2%. The apparent price difference is mostly your country's tax. If you buy it at retail, say in New ...


20

Don't pack anything. You'll find much cheaper, and probably better, plug adapters all over India. Expect to pay Rs 15-30 for simple ones that just accommodate US-style plugs, and Rs 40-50 for full universal ones. You can find them at any general store/convenience store in major cities and tourist locations, but might get a better selection at electrician's ...


20

I used to 'get around this' technicality by asking at the info desks at airports where there might be a power point to charge my laptop etc, even if I'd spotted some. They'd usually helpfully point out one, or say 'oh just use any you find'. That way I figured I'd be able to argue being covered if it came down to security yelling at me or worse. I've also ...


19

There are essentially two ways to check if your appliance or its charger work on 220V. Usually the fine print on the adapter will give the range, saying something like: "Rated input:AC 100-240V". If the voltage of the country falls in the range specified, you will be fine. If you can't find the voltage on the charger, try downloading the instruction manual ...


19

I've travelled from the UK to many European computer/hacker festivals over the last 10 years or so, often taking strange devices similar to yours (homebrew machines, Raspberry Pi boards, 80s retro computers...) through airport and Eurostar security - and I'd say that about 80% of the time it attracts no attention at all - it just goes through the X-ray with ...


18

In India, a lot of plug sockets look like this they seem to accept plug types from most countries. It's a shame you can't find these everywhere.


18

To tackle the second part of your question first, we have previously covered this ground on WiFi / 3G coverage in Europe in the following questions: Are there companies that offer worldwide WiFi roaming for a fixed fee? (I might also point out specifically here to look at FON, linked to by Andra in the question itself, in addition to the answers.) Is there ...


18

One of the simplest, cleanest and cheapest solutions that I've seen is a couple I met who were travelling around South America. They'd back up onto a second SD card as well. When a card was full, they'd simply put it in an envelope and mail it home. Very cheap and very easy, and pretty reliable. Send it registered mail if you don't trust it. Once their ...


17

External drives (or internal ones - same drive, different case) will have zero problems with commercial air travel. X-rays don't affect them, and any in-flight vibrations capable of damaging a disk drive will also destroy the airplane. Now that's assuming it's turned off. Running drives don't like to be knocked around, but that applies on your desk too. As ...


16

There are three concerns: 1) terrorism; 2) export/import limitations; and 3) the fire hazard from the lithium contained in the cell phone and laptop batteries. Terrorism: the difficulty of addressing terrorism is that the level of screening and scrutiny is often arbitrary depending on the current political climate and the capriciousness of the security ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible