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35

There's no mention of electronic boards etc in the TSA prohibited items list. So provided they aren't so heavy as to be a potential "blunt instrument" weapon, you should be ok. If they're in original packaging, that might help. Of course, they don't have to let any items through, restricted list or not. You may also wish to check the website of your ...


26

Millions of smartphones and 10's (if not 100's) of thousands of Kindles/E-book readers go through airport scanners every day. So far I believe the number that have apparently been damaged by airport scanner stands at about 2 for Kindle, and I've never heard of a smartphone being damaged by any form of scanners. (And in the case of the Kindles there's ...


25

For hotel rooms there is an easy solution: It is called the "hotel safe". Earnestly, do not store important valuables in hotel rooms. Even cheap hotels have very likely a cupboard which is under constant supervision at least at daytime. If you have a rented apartment you have another situation. Burglars and thieves have the following mindset: Break in as ...


23

Get a European USB Charger I would buy a USB charger with a European plug (image courtesy of aliexpress): Travel Convenient EU Plug Wall USB Charger Adapter For Samsung Galaxy S5 S4 S3 Note 3 by Ali Express, fair use It beats the weight of your US charger plus a plug adapter, it's cheap a as dirt (2-something bucks on eBay), it can be used for all your ...


22

Against your insurer, perhaps, no chance of extracting compensation from BA: 8f) Fragile or perishable items must not be packed in baggage checked into the hold You must not include in your checked baggage fragile or perishable items or items of special value such as: money jewellery precious metals computers personal electronic ...


21

X Rays don't penetrate metal. Circuit boards have a lot of metal and solder, making it easy to conceal items within. If the TSA can't see it, they get nervous. Hence the 'take out your laptop.' (Why they don't require that of iPads, I don't know.) Now, all this being said, you can get bags that have laptop compartments. The only requirement is that ...


21

Technically, they are not permitted in-flight. Bluetooth is a form of wireless communication, and all wireless communication is banned during airborne operations by the FCC and the FAA. As mentioned by @AnkurBanerjee in this post, FAA Advisory Circular 91.21-1B covers this regulation.


21

One of the most effective measures I use frequently when travelling is Kensington lock. It's very likely your laptop already has the appropriate slot, so you need to buy the chain and that's about it. I lock my laptop at any rented place I stay, even if it's a reputable hotel -- no need to take any chances. The cable should fit easily in your hand baggage. ...


20

I used to 'get around this' technicality by asking at the info desks at airports where there might be a power point to charge my laptop etc, even if I'd spotted some. They'd usually helpfully point out one, or say 'oh just use any you find'. That way I figured I'd be able to argue being covered if it came down to security yelling at me or worse. I've also ...


19

Don't pack anything. You'll find much cheaper, and probably better, plug adapters all over India. Expect to pay Rs 15-30 for simple ones that just accommodate US-style plugs, and Rs 40-50 for full universal ones. You can find them at any general store/convenience store in major cities and tourist locations, but might get a better selection at electrician's ...


19

There are essentially two ways to check if your appliance or its charger work on 220V. Usually the fine print on the adapter will give the range, saying something like: "Rated input:AC 100-240V". If the voltage of the country falls in the range specified, you will be fine. If you can't find the voltage on the charger, try downloading the instruction manual ...


17

To tackle the second part of your question first, we have previously covered this ground on WiFi / 3G coverage in Europe in the following questions: Are there companies that offer worldwide WiFi roaming for a fixed fee? (I might also point out specifically here to look at FON, linked to by Andra in the question itself, in addition to the answers.) Is there ...


17

Seems unlikely it's anything more than normal electrostatic discharge. The fact that it only affects you could be related to your clothes or shoes (especially if they are made of synthetic fibers). I also wonder whether the moving conveyor belt could be acting as a Van de Graff generator. Do you not get shocks like that under other circumstances? (I live ...


16

External drives (or internal ones - same drive, different case) will have zero problems with commercial air travel. X-rays don't affect them, and any in-flight vibrations capable of damaging a disk drive will also destroy the airplane. Now that's assuming it's turned off. Running drives don't like to be knocked around, but that applies on your desk too. As ...


15

From the US Customs and Border patrol website: As Secretary Chertoff noted in a recent op-ed, "Of the approximately 400 million travelers who entered the country last year, only a tiny percentage were referred to secondary baggage inspection…[and] of those, only a fraction had electronic devices that may have been checked." So, (if they are being ...


15

When power outlets were first installed on airliners, they used a special adapter called EmPower, which looked like this: The airlines obviously thought that frequent flyers would be happy to buy a new kind of adapter for all their gizmos. This turned out not to be entirely true... nobody wanted to buy these new stupid adapters, and the airlines ...


15

In India, a lot of plug sockets look like this they seem to accept plug types from most countries. It's a shame you can't find these everywhere.


15

One of the simplest, cleanest and cheapest solutions that I've seen is a couple I met who were travelling around South America. They'd back up onto a second SD card as well. When a card was full, they'd simply put it in an envelope and mail it home. Very cheap and very easy, and pretty reliable. Send it registered mail if you don't trust it. Once their ...


15

It's not theft. Unless otherwise noted, intentionally blocked, or obviously intended for some other purpose (e.g. to plug in an ATM), the outlets in the waiting area are specifically there for passenger convenience. In fact, airliners and airports are specifically expanding this functionality for more people to take advantage of; Omaha's Eppley Airfield ...


14

I think there are two views here. Firstly, the backpacker as we know it is changing, or splitting. There are still the 'true', 'hardcore' backpackers, who want to hitchhike everywhere with two pairs of socks and three shirts and a sleeping roll on their back. That's great, but it's not for everyone. As hostels become more ubiquitous, wifi appears ...


14

Disclaimer: IANAL Allegedly if CBP officers find something clearly marked as "business confidential", they may not proceed without authorization of higher-ups. Guidelines have been described in document DoHS's document "Privacy Impact Assessment: CBP and ICE Border Searches of Electronic Devices". Seems that according to this if CBP officers would ...


14

The fourth line of text on the device (counting those two lines on the top right) says: EINGANG 230V~50Hz 4W where 'Eingang' is German for 'input', '230V~50Hz' means '230Volts AC at 50Hz' and 4W is the maximum power. Since the US mains have a voltage of 120V and a frequency of 60Hz, you will need a transformer, but then the device will work.


14

I question your premise. Take the 15" Macbook pro with retina display. Price in U.K. is GBP 1332.00 + 267 VAT = USD 2035.00 + VAT (using exchange rate today) Price in U.S. is USD 1999.00 + State sales tax. So the difference in pre-tax price is less than 2%. The apparent price difference is mostly your country's tax. If you buy it at retail, say in New ...


14

Building on Calchas' comment, my coworkers and I have carried large, odd-looking electronic research equipment onto international flights on numerous occasions, on different airlines, departing from and passing through different airports. We have never had a problem. Usually, bags containing such equipment are given extra screening; security will pull us ...


13

I agree with @R.. I spent over four months in Delhi in 2009, and while I did bring over a couple of plug adapters with me, it's much easier and cheaper to just buy them there. Any market will have them. (Just remember that the price of almost anything in India is negotiable!) In addition to buying a couple of plug adapters, you can also purchase a universal ...


13

As I understand it, lithium batteries are not permitted to be carried aboard if there is any possibility of the contacts being shorted out in transit (this can lead to excessive current draw, heat, and possibly fire or even explosion). If the battery is inside your laptop, it is considered protected against accidental short. If a battery is carried outside ...


12

Yes, Commissioners of HMRC have broad and ancient powers to seize goods they suspect are illegally imported. In this case, unless you can satisfy HMRC that you were not importing the item, you will have to pay a fine and the appropriate duty and VAT on the item. I am not sure I agree with Relaxed's post, I think in this circumstance the item might be ...


11

Indonesia uses European-style two-pin round plugs ('C'-type is the most common variant found): Voltage is at 220 V 50 Hz (as opposed to 110 V 60 Hz in US). Most modern electronic equipment that has auto-sensing capability should work without needing a voltage converter, you will need a plug adapter though which can buy cheap online. As for Apple products ...


11

It's very hard to make a universal socket that's compliant with all the safety standards that would apply. Eg in the UK BS 1363 sockets must have shutters over the L and N holes and plugs must be fused. The simple answer, if you are travelling to many countries, is often to take your domestic power strip but change the plug on it to a IEC 60320 inlet. This ...


11

Yes you can, portable electronic devices (PEDS) are divided into few categories, some of them are: PEDs allowed all the times: such as some medical devices. They are allowed during all phases of the flight, for example some medical oxygen devices. PEDs allowed during cruise: Most of the electronic devices are in this category, you can use them during the ...



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