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18

It depends on the item. Alcoholic spirits (whiskey etc) and tobacco are the usual items to get, since they typically are the most heavily taxed items, so can be considerably cheaper at Duty Free than in either country. Usually you'll be able to get all of the major name-brand items, and sometimes some regional items (eg. Jenevers - Dutch gins - if in ...


15

It depends on the origin and destination airport For most flights, liquids purchased after the security check can be taken on-board the plane. Not all though... For an example, at the moment (2011), for flights to Australia, no liquids (beyond the 150ml limit) may be taken onto the plane with you - there's an additional security + liquids check at boarding....


15

In general the laws pertaining to age for consuming alcohol and purchasing alcohol apply to people within the international departure area of an airport. You are within the territory of the country the airport is in, so you are subject to that country's laws. Some countries do waive specific rules within an international airport, such as allowing ...


14

Since you are flying internationally, you will have to clear customs and re-check your baggage at Newark. You can carry your duty free purchase on board the Glasgow-Newark leg of your journey, and can then simply place in your checked baggage in Newark, for your onward connection. Some more information is available from the TSA website.


12

Aircrew aren't worried about your carrying on "liquids", they're worried about your drinking alcohol. If someone is "getting high off his own supply" as Tony Montana used to say, they might have trouble cutting him off if he gets unruly. Presuming your doctor just wants to make sure you have plenty of water, just bring an empty water bottle and explain ...


10

As you're going from Terminal 5 to Terminal 1 you will need to re-clear security, and your duty free liquids will not be allowed through regardless of how they are packaged. Normally the solution to this would be to put the duty free in your checked luggage after clearing customs, but given that you're on a "pre-cleared" flight you are correct in that your ...


9

There are two kinds of taxes you can possibly avoid buying in duty free shop: Excise tax — this typically applies to alcohol and tobacco, in some cases perfumes (also fuel and firearms, but these aren't sold in airports ;-) VAT (sales tax) — if and only if you're traveling from EU to destination out of EU. It's also possible to get VAT refund ...


9

I am not a lawyer, but from looking at the instructions to travelers by the Canadian Government, as well as from my personal experience, it seems that the following should work: You are allowed to bring items with you for your personal use when you enter Canada from the outside. This includes, for example, a laptop, or jewelry. Thus, you should not even ...


8

While I never tried to bring alcohol to Australia from Hong Kong personally, there are plenty of reports saying it's not possible. I have never seen the required duty-free sealed packages in Hong Kong on the airport. Both this report from 2012 and this one here from last year say that it's impossible. Also this here from August this year confirms that. I ...


7

All passengers arriving in the US, regardless of whether they are connecting or not, need to collect their bags and pass through US Customs with them. If you have a connecting flight you can then drop your bags for the onwards flight. This is true both for domestic and international connections. Thus you will definitely have access to your bags in DFW, ...


7

Shops normally cannot sell to tourists VAT/Duty free just because you have a plane ticket. The maximum a shop can do is sell you VAT-Free since that is a separate charge. Duties on Liquor and Cigarettes are not known to the personnel since they are applied at the manufacturer/wholeseller level so the shop cannot sell you those without charging the duty. It's ...


7

As Newark is your entry point into the US you'll need to clear immigration and customs, which will involve collecting your checked luggage, and then re-checking your luggage and re-clearing security before catching your onward flight. As you need to re-clear security you will not be able to take any liquids with you on the domestic flight (exception the <...


6

Yes, I was last in KL about 12 months ago, and they do deliver the duty free goods to the gate for you.


6

Friends ask me to buy Tobacco at duty free. Since cigarettes are heavily taxed in my country (France , 80% of price are tax). That's the only product I buy for friends at duty free. Lots of people ignore that Luxury items (such as perfume, wine…) can be de-taxed (VAT) at the shop where you bought them. Ask for it and show proof you're foreigner. This way is ...


6

As far as I know Ryanair never stated that it is possible to bring on board an extra bag with the airport purchase, this is what is official. Anyway, in my personal experience it really depends on the policy applied by the airport: I'm a frequent Ryanair passenger and I only found a single Ryanair airport not allowing carrying on board the duty free shop (...


6

Yes you will have to pay duty, as it is a new item that was purchased overseas. If you were at home, lost it and bought a new replacement, you will have paid Australian duty on that item, as the importer paid duty when it originally came from the factory (and of course included the cost of that duty in the selling price you paid). In this case, if you buy ...


6

You have two options: contact World Duty Free, as @JoErNanO indicated in his comment, or contact Heathrow Airport directly. Heathrow Airport has a section dealing with media and filming: http://mediacentre.heathrow.com/filming_permits - while main focus is on news filming, from that page you can deduce that they entertain non-news filming and photography as ...


6

A lot depends on where you are going and where you have your layover. If you are going somewhere quite expensive and stopping somewhere cheap, then maybe you could get things like a plug adapter at a better price (even with the airport premium). Doing the reverse, then wait til you get to your destination. Of course then there is the issue as to whether ...


5

You could try using the prices from a HK supermarket as a rough guide. Park N Shop is a pretty big chain (http://www.parknshop.com/WebShop/index.do); the other major one is Wellcome (http://www.wellcome.com.hk/wd2shop/en/html/index.html). I can't remember what the situation is with taxes on alcohol in HK, but I think it'll be a pretty safe bet it'll be ...


5

I am told, the problem with them Indian customs is, you can read them boys all the rules from the book, but if they see you with more than 2 average sized (750 ml ?) alcoholic bottles, you have had it. By the book, you can carry 2 liters of alcohol : http://www.cbec.gov.in/trvler-guide_ason22may2013.pdf 3. What are the norms for the import of Alcoholic ...


5

From Sydney Airport's page: A family entering Australia can pool their individual allowances. For example: a family of 4 (2 adults and 2 children) are entitled to bring in: 4.5 litres of alcoholic beverages (2 x adults alcohol allowance of 2.25L= 4.5L) + 100 cigarettes (2 x adults tobacco allowance of 50 cigarettes = 100) + ...


5

The nearest thing I know of to what you're asking about is the ability for visitors to some countries to another country to either buy an item and avoid tax provided the item is shipped directly abroad; or to pay full price, but apply for a refund of the taxed amount after returning home. Details vary country to country (if offered at all), and usually ...


5

Ask your flight attendant for a cup of water; it's free.


5

You can take them provided they're packed in a sealed tamper-evident bag, with a receipt inside the bag. Also, it's better if they're bought just prior to flight. During security check they must be presented for separate inspection. Liquids might be removed from the bag, scanned, and repacked in a new bag, which can take up to 5-10 minutes depending on the ...


4

It's worth noting that if your flight transits through an Australian airport en route to your final destination, you will be rescreened at the transit airport and you may not take liquid, aerosol and gel products (including duty free) in excess of the restrictions through the screening point. Please check with your airline whether your flight transits ...


4

That should not be a problem. In all airports I know, the duty-free shops are behind the security check. So you should be able to buy there water and bring it to the plane. If the shops are before the security check, it could be a problem to take such a large amount of fluid with you.


4

This is actually two questions: is the airport duty free a cheaper way to buy something in country X than other stores in country X? is the airport duty free a cheaper way to buy something than buying it at home? When I bring wine or rum into Canada, Canadian customs doesn't care whether I bought it a duty free or not. So if prices or selections are ...


4

At Brussels South Charleroi (Belgium) you may take one bag with purchases from the "Sky shop" after the security check, in addition to your hand bagage.


4

Duty free is normally cheaper, because it has no duties on the items. German speciality liquors are Kirschwasser, Zwetschgenwasser (it is not water; it is a clear distillate), or the infamous Jägermeister (which is a bitter). There are also several monasteries who produce their own liquor (in the label you would find "Kloster").


4

Limits are explicitly per person, as far as I've ever seen, not per bag. The customs officials might challenge your assertion that you each own one bottle, based on the fact that they're in the same bag, but you ought to be able to rebut the challenge. For example, if you have separate receipts for the items (especially if they were purchased with bank ...



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