Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

I don't know where the info is coming from. We have dual citizenship, British/Canadian and live in Canada (for 52 years) and travelled to England for a month (June). My wife got sick and needed medical attention. There was no question about residency or anything else. She received the attention she needed and was told that any visitor to England receives ...


1

It's a bit abstract but it seems difficult. You will need to reenter country A at some stage, at which point you would usually need to show your visa (or something else entitling you to enter but if you are, e.g., a citizen of country A you wouldn't need a visa in the first place). Some countries also have a police check on exit, where you have to show your ...


1

According to Timatic, you can enter Britain on an expired British passport, providing it is endorsed "British Citizen" (or some other endorsement indicating right of abode in the UK). The idea is that all British citizens are allowed to enter Britain: they don't need permission, just proof of that status. An expired passport proves citizenship just as well ...


4

There is no requirement to consistently enter a country with the same (nationality) passport for your entire lifetime. You can enter the USA as an Italian citizen (subject to the normal procedures such as ESTA), without reference to your Argentinian citizenship at all.


3

Each country is basically free to set their own rules. Generally speaking, presenting the local passport when you are a citizen is the most practical course of action but it's not like it would be some sort of overarching principle that applies to all countries in the world. In all likelihood, Denmark does not care either way. The US, on the other hand, ...


9

The general rule is that you should always use the country's passport when entering the country. As the other answers note, many countries (eg. the US) also have legislation requiring citizens to use their passport to enter/leave, although obviously this is hard to enforce. Obviously there are cases where you can get away with this in practice, eg. your ...



Top 50 recent answers are included