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0

I've found these responses on a forum which seem similar to what I'm asking. Basically the HKID card is proof of residency, not nationality. If you have never applied for or gotten a HKSAR passport, and you only have an Australian one, then you are simply a citizen of Australia. I'm not sure if this is 100% correct. Would anyone like to second this?


1

If a person was born before 19 Aug 1986 in Australia they have the right to Australian citizenship. If they were born after that date, then one of their parents has to be an Australian citizen or Permanent Resident in order to qualify for Australian citizenship. So in this case it would dependent on whether the parents had Permanent Resident status or not. ...


1

I have only ever been asked to show my boarding pass on arrival once. It was on a flight from Ireland to the UK. The reason was that Ireland is the only country you can enter the UK from without going through passport control (due to the border between the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland), and this was a simple way to verify that passengers had ...


2

The boarding pass would only be an issue if it were a requirement for the type of visa you would need to enter Sri Lanka (personally I have never faced such a requirement). However, even if you wanted a transit visa - the officer would be asking for your flight itinerary/reservation rather than boarding passes. On arrival to Sri Lanka I want to show and ...


5

Sri Lanka does not know or care that you have multiple nationalities, so using your UK passport will be fine. Immigration can ask pretty much anything they want to, but I can't recall ever having to show my boarding pass on arrival. If they did, and they noticed the name is different, there is nothing wrong with showing your Chinese passport as well. That ...


2

As @user102008 explained, what you plan on doing is perfectly fine. But note that you can use whichever passport you feel like when checking in (or even show the airline several passports if needed). This has no consequences and you can always show your EU passport later, at the official passport check at your destination airport. The US is a little more ...


2

My main confusion is that I've read that you should always exit and enter a country with the same passport (which I am obviously not doing) You are doing it. The thing you are forgetting is that exiting country A and entering country B are two separate things (and the airline check-in is a third separate thing). When you exit country A, you should ...


1

I have dual citizenship in the U.S. & Canada, and I live in the U.S. Since I have relatives on both sides of the border, I have flown and driven across the border more times than I can count, presenting my U.S. passport when entering the United States and my Canadian passport when I have entered Canada. I have never once run into a problem with this. ...


1

Generally, airlines worry most about you holding a VISA for the destination country. I have left the US many times forgetting to return my I-94, but I obviously had an entry record for that passport. However, it is illegal for US citizens to enter or leave the US on another than a US passport. Since you are a US citizen, you can not obtain a US visa (for ...


8

The government of Canada won't check your passport upon departure, so this is not a problem. Your airline will check your passport, but they just want you to hold a valid passport; they won't care what country it's from. You will, of course, want to have your Canadian passport with you for your return to Canada.


1

The anser to your question can depend on the countries involved. For example, a US State Department website says this about dual citizenship Israeli-Americans: "Israeli citizens naturalized in the United States retain their Israeli citizenship, and children born in the United States to Israeli parents usually acquire both U.S. and Israeli nationality at ...


2

I ended up flying in the day before my passport expired, and then I asked the port officer what would have happened. She told me that they would give me a fine and a warning. How much of a fine, I don't know. But at least you could enter without too harsh a consequence in an emergency.


4

I have the same situation and have traveled extensively. There where a few reasons why to use two passports on one trip: Exiting one country which I have a passport to and entering the other country to which I am a citizen (must use the right passport for each country). Was running out of space for stamps on the passport (just lazy to get a new one) Going ...


2

It isn't really the airline's decision to choose which travel document you travel on. Yes, we all know for instance that you should enter the USA on the US passport (by law—if you have one), but should you enter the UK on your US passport or your Greek passport? The document you use will depend on the purpose of your visit, and your own circumstances. And ...


2

The countries that do not allow dual citizenship are very many more than just China and showing passports indicating two nationalities to an official of one of these may get the holder into trouble. Even where dual citizenship is not an issue, an entry stamp in one passport and an exit one in another may be inconvenient.


-3

10 years ago I was traveling from country A to country B, country A is my so-called home country. Like I explained in an other question it's one of the most corrupted countries. The officer insisted on knowing how am I going to enter country B. $50 dollars done the trick and he stamped passport A not my British passport. Country B had no problem with ...


17

This is a common situation, and it's generally no problem. I'll use A for the country you're in, and B for the country you're going to, but all the "flows" described here work equally well if you want to use your B passport to go to a third country. Case 1: Same name, dual citizenship OK If you have the same name in both passports (that is, same first ...


2

In order to board a BA flight to the UK with your Bahraini passport, it needs to have an entry clearance in it. Since you don't have one, the answer is you should use your British passport. You should make the reservations with that passport so that your name will sync up to your travel document. Michael Hampton's answer addresses how to handle Bahraini ...


9

As a rule, at airline check-in, you need to show the airline the documents that prove that you can transit any countries that you may be transiting, and that you can enter the destination country. If you travel on a direct flight from Bahrain to the UK, then you need to show the airline the documents that prove you can enter the UK. In your case, this is ...


4

There will be no problem leaving the US. The airline only wants to check your passport to see if you are have the correct documentation to get off the plane at your destination. However, it is illegal according to US law for a US citizen to enter the US using a non-US passport. So you'll have problems coming back home unless you make arrangements to have ...



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