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0

I think you have the basics right. In your case, both passports could let you enter Germany but the US also has a rule that US citizens must use their US passport to enter the country (I think European countries, including Germany are much less concerned about that). Since the US uses airline data to replace exit immigration and checks passenger manifests ...


0

What she needs to do is to report her marriage and name change to the Korean Embassy and have a new Korean passport issued with her new name. Irregardless of the dual nationality issue, her name changed at marriage and needs to be updated on her Korean documents (passport, DL, etc). As long as her two passports have different names, travel between the ...


2

My question is: the next time she exits New Zealand to go back to Korea, what passport should she use? The easiest way to do this is the following: Book the tickets using her Korean name. Because she will use both passports (and therefore both names) at different times during travel, her Korean name is the only one that appears in both passports (as ...


3

Most countries let their nationals leave and enter with very little requirements beyond holding some form of ID. There was and is such a thing as an exit visa in some parts of the world or countries that do not readily issue passports to limit emigration (historically, it was in fact a passport's main purpose) but I would be very surprised if that was the ...


12

The "enter and exit a country with the same passport" rule is not absolute. It's mostly for if you're visiting a country for a short visit, for entry/departure tracking purposes. In this case, where she naturalized, it's not only possible but expected of her to enter and leave New Zealand with a New Zealand passport, because she is now a New Zealand ...


5

My suggestion is to use only the New Zealand passport for the trip and book the flight tickets with the name written on the New Zealand passport. New Zealanders don't require a visa to visit South Korea (90 days). The only problem is her dual citizenship situation, New Zealand allows dual citizenship without issues, South Korea has some limitations on this ...


0

Its quite simple: At departure, show your Pakistan passport to get the boarding pass; otherwise the airline will not accept you for travel. At departure immigration, stamp your Finnish passport (if applicable - I am not sure what is the procedure for departure in Finland), because this is the passport you will be stamping when you come back to Finland. ...


1

You generally must always enter and exit a country on the same passport. The passport you exit a country with does not have to be the same one as the one you enter the next country with.


0

I have two passports, I generally book my flight using whichever one works better at the destination. I leave my country of residence using my passport-with-visa. There appears to be no connection between immigration control and the airlines - the airlines want to know that you are able to enter the destination country (or they get a nice big penalty) and my ...


3

The only significant restriction I know of is that you must enter the US with your US passport (there may be a restriction by the country of issue of your EU passport, but probably not). Therefore you need to carry both passports. It doesn't matter which passport you book your outbound flight with, but it's probably a good idea to book your flight back to ...


1

Since you are a US citizen, you don't need to worry about the US using passenger records to implement the electronic I-94 system, and the possible confusion that using multiple passports may cause there. You will obviously require your US passport upon returning to the US. You can book all your flights using your EU passport, and keep your US passport ...



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