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There are at least four separate problems here. The following answer is speculative, but short of somebody working in Chinese immigration chiming in, you're unlikely to get a better answer. Problem 1: Will the airline let you leave the US with a Chinese passport? Likely answer: yes. In my experience, the US and its airlines understands the concept of ...


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You should have no trouble with this. You certainly are not the first person to acquire a new citizenship after visiting the US, so they are used to it happening. As long as you fill out all the question correctly on your ESTA (which you need if you enter by air or sea) and/or VWP application, and tell them about your previous citizenships if asked, you ...


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There shouldn't be a problem with you entering the UK on your UK passport. The issue would only arise if you tried to enter on the (now technically invalid) visa. If you think there might be a problem, go through the manual checkpoint upon arrival in the UK and ask the UKBF official to cancel the visa. If they can't do it there and then, they can probably ...


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Based on the following answer - http://travel.stackexchange.com/a/21936/42483 You can enter any EU/EEA country (which includes the UK for the next 2+ years definitely) without an ID card or passport as long as you can prove your nationality with whatever means. The only difference is whether it takes you less than a minute to walk through immigration or ...


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I was in exactly the same circumstances and I managed to enter the UK without any issues.


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The official advice is no, you cannot enter New Zealand using an expired New Zealand passport. In the case of NZ and Australian passport holders or NZ residents/Australian permanent residents (with current travel conditions), your passport must be valid for enough time to allow you to travel to New Zealand (ie, it must be valid on the date you are ...


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There are two aspects to the question: EU countries are extremely unlikely to put specific restrictions on entry by dual citizens. It's never been done nor discussed and would raise many questions. There is a general difference in philosophy at play here, US authorities routinely look at the country of birth for many purposes (e.g. security clearances) ...


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Until when can they (US citizens) be sure they'll be able to enter the EU without a visa? That is unfortunately impossible to say. If the EU decides to suspend visa free travel to the Schengen area for US citizens, the date of effect must be 'within 90 days' of the publication of the decision (Regulation (EU) No 1289/2013, Article 1(f)). It can ...


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In general, border guards in third countries have no business trying to determine based on your passport if you have complied with the Schengen rules in earlier visits. Passports don't consistently contain enough information for them to do that -- for example, non-EEA nationals with residence permits in a Schengen country will routinely have widely separated ...


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Whenever you travel without your Schengen passport, you run the risk of being treated as someone who does not possess the right of free movement within the European union (and non-EU Schengen countries). Nobody can predict what trouble might arise. You could be "banned" from the Schengen area if you cannot prove your Schengen nationality, though the ban ...



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