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45

From the ESTA Online Help: What if I have dual citizenship, but my non-VWP passport is expired or I do not have a passport for that country? If you have any additional passports, please enter the most recent passport information, even if that passport is expired. If you are a dual citizen but do not have a passport from another country, select the ...


42

You are actually showing your passport to several different officials. The airline. They will check your passport at check-in time to insure that you have the right to enter the country you are flying to. That is because under international treaties, if an airline delivers you to a country that you do not have permission to enter, they are legally obliged ...


18

Aas long as you leave a country with the same passport that you entered in on, then you're ok. So: Option 1: Entering Aus on Aus passport, leaving on Greek = bad Option 2: Entering on Greek, leaving on Aus = bad Option 3: Entering and leaving on Greek passport = good Option 4: Entering and leaving on Aus passport = good The reason being for counts and ...


17

This is a common situation, and it's generally no problem. I'll use A for the country you're in, and B for the country you're going to, but all the "flows" described here work equally well if you want to use your B passport to go to a third country. Case 1: Same name, dual citizenship OK If you have the same name in both passports (that is, same first ...


15

In my experience as a holder of multiple passports, airlines don't care what passport details you enter when you book. (The primary exception being the US, which is picky and wants to know everything in advance.) As long as your name doesn't change, and they can verify on check-in that you have a visa or don't need one, they're fine. Out of interest, where ...


14

The short answer is no. The long answer is here: http://www.adviceguide.org.uk/wales/healthcare_w/healthcare_help_with_health_costs_e/nhs_charges_for_people_from_abroad.htm With the following being the most salient bits: Your entitlement to free NHS treatment depends on the length and purpose of your residence in the UK, not your nationality. and ...


13

Definitely you should use your Australian passport in Australia and Greek passport in Greece (because for these countries you are their citizen and they don't really care if you have a dual nationality). And as others have said it's safest to use the same passport to enter and exit the country. However, in many countries the police would not check your ...


13

Technically there's no issue at all with doing this. However where she could have a problem is in convincing the immigration officials that she is the child's true parent, and has authority to take him across country lines. I'd suggest taking a copy of your son's birth certificate showing that she is the child's mother, as well as a letter from you giving ...


12

(I am assuming by China you mean the People's Republic of China.) In your case, the bigger problem than multiple passports is, according to Chinese nationality law (section 9), you automatically lose your Chinese citizenship when you voluntarily apply for and acquire another citizenship. So from a legal point of view, you are no longer a Chinese citizen, and ...


12

Although not a specific answer to your question, according to the Embassy of Finland in Washington, D.C Finland does allow dual citizenship : After June 1st, 2003 dual /multiple nationality is accepted by the Finnish legislation. Finnish nationals will no longer lose their Finnish nationality when they assume another nationality. Neither will ...


11

The Cuba Information Manual ("The Definitive Guide to Legal and Illegal Travel to Cuba") says: The embargo laws do not forbid U.S. citizens from traveling to Cuba. They do, however, forbid U.S. citizens from spending money there without the proper permits, which essentially amounts to the same thing—unless you plan on begging your way around the ...


11

You only need to show the one you're travelling with. I have two passports* as well, and NEVER use my South African one. However, if you need to show the other one merely for ID for the plane ticket, then it's just like a form of photo ID, and only at the checkin counter. However, for the actual travelling bit, you'll know need to use one at a time. (* ...


11

As discussed in answer to your other question, the The NHS is a residence-based healthcare system. As such, if you're not resident in the UK, you wouldn't normally have access to the NHS. There are two broad exceptions though. One of those, as mentioned before, is for countries with reciprocal healthcare agreements, but Canada isn't one of them. There is ...


10

A few searches through this site will discover pairs of countries that don't like to see each other's stamps in your passport. If you plan things right, you can use separate passports to make this less of a worry for you. For example you might use one passport for Israel and the other for all the countries that might not like seeing an Israel stamp, or whose ...


10

Neither an ESTA or a Visa guarantees entry to a country. This is true for every country in the world - the final decision to allow you entry or not to the country is made by the immigration officials at the border at the time of entry. However, the odds of being turned away at the border are extremely small - unless you've specifically done something to ...


10

Dual national here, and a holder of multiple passports from the same country before I became one. I usually travel with all the passports I expect to need on a given trip, and no more. This always means my 'home' passport, plus my other passport if there's a good reason for it: returning to 'other home', one nationality is visa-free but the other isn't, ...


9

Yes, you can travel, but you need to use both passports. This is going to be the third answer saying basically the same thing, but let me break it down into exact steps. When leaving the UK: Check in at the airport, show your Australian passport to airline staff. There is no exit immigration in the UK, so you do not need to show your Lebanese passport to ...


9

The "enter and exit a country with the same passport" rule is not absolute. It's mostly for if you're visiting a country for a short visit, for entry/departure tracking purposes. In this case, where she naturalized, it's not only possible but expected of her to enter and leave New Zealand with a New Zealand passport, because she is now a New Zealand ...


9

As such, using a different passport to board the plane than the one you plan to use to enter the destination country is not a problem and probably pretty common. If there is an exit passport check in the country you are leaving, you can also show a different passport at check-in and to the border guards or, if you are unsure, simply show both passports and ...


9

As a rule, at airline check-in, you need to show the airline the documents that prove that you can transit any countries that you may be transiting, and that you can enter the destination country. If you travel on a direct flight from Bahrain to the UK, then you need to show the airline the documents that prove you can enter the UK. In your case, this is ...


8

You need a visa for neither country because you are a citizen of each. When you enter a country, in order not to need a visa, you show them the passport of that country. In your case, when arriving to Saudi Arabia, you show them the Saudi passport. When arriving to the UK, say after you get back, you show them the UK one. You obviously need to have both ...


8

As an American citizen you are required to the follow the laws of the USA despite any other nationality that you may have. Most laws don't apply to citizens residing abroad, but some do. Perhaps the most significant is paying taxes on world-wide income, but also includes participating in the selective service (military draft), reporting foreign bank account ...


8

There is no international authority that sets any such limit, nor one which would have the ability to enforce it. But for most people, it is not practical to maintain too many multiple nationalities. Most countries frown upon multiple citizenships, and place some restrictions on it, at least on paper. Some countries, like Austria, only allow dual ...


8

This would make me a dual national if my application is accepted and processed; however, the status of my application has not yet been confirmed, so I am still only a British citizen. I'm yet to know if I've even been accepted for citizenship. Applying for a passport cannot "make you a dual national" -- rather, having a country's nationality is a ...


8

No you are not. Access to healthcare is based on residency, not citizenship. If you are not resident in Ireland (and not resident in a country with reciprocal agreements, such as the EU, Switzerland and Australia) then you are not entitled to free healthcare. There are some exceptions to this, but none of them appear to apply to you according to the ...


8

The government of Canada won't check your passport upon departure, so this is not a problem. Your airline will check your passport, but they just want you to hold a valid passport; they won't care what country it's from. You will, of course, want to have your Canadian passport with you for your return to Canada.


7

As long as you leave and enter on the same passport it is fine... for instance I have a South African and Swiss passport. Leave and enter SA on my SA passport and enter and leave Switzerland on my Swiss passport. No hassles! It does seem weird but for all the country cares you haven't left an airplane the whole time!


7

If you have booked your ticket in your Chinese name I expect you are travelling from China, if this is true then you need to show both your passports to the airline and just the Chinese to passport officials.


7

Given that you are a dual citizen (British and Canadian) you can get a Canadian Passport at one of the Passport Canada Offices, which there are many around Toronto in 24 hours for C$110 and then as a Canadian citizen travel to the United States with no issues of Visas, ESTAs, VWPs or similar.


7

Entering and leaving a country with different passports is indeed not advised. If the country uses computerized records (like the US), the entry and exit could conceivably fail to be matched and you risk being marked as an overstayer. If the country rely on stamps and checks passports on exit (like the Schengen area), border guards will demand to see the ...



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