Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

25

You are actually showing your passport to several different officials. The airline. They will check your passport at check-in time to insure that you have the right to enter the country you are flying to. That is because under international treaties, if an airline delivers you to a country that you do not have permission to enter, they are legally obliged ...


16

Aas long as you leave a country with the same passport that you entered in on, then you're ok. So: Option 1: Entering Aus on Aus passport, leaving on Greek = bad Option 2: Entering on Greek, leaving on Aus = bad Option 3: Entering and leaving on Greek passport = good Option 4: Entering and leaving on Aus passport = good The reason being for counts and ...


13

Technically there's no issue at all with doing this. However where she could have a problem is in convincing the immigration officials that she is the child's true parent, and has authority to take him across country lines. I'd suggest taking a copy of your son's birth certificate showing that she is the child's mother, as well as a letter from you giving ...


12

Definitely you should use your Australian passport in Australia and Greek passport in Greece (because for these countries you are their citizen and they don't really care if you have a dual nationality). And as others have said it's safest to use the same passport to enter and exit the country. However, in many countries the police would not check your ...


10

A few searches through this site will discover pairs of countries that don't like to see each other's stamps in your passport. If you plan things right, you can use separate passports to make this less of a worry for you. For example you might use one passport for Israel and the other for all the countries that might not like seeing an Israel stamp, or whose ...


10

You only need to show the one you're travelling with. I have two passports* as well, and NEVER use my South African one. However, if you need to show the other one merely for ID for the plane ticket, then it's just like a form of photo ID, and only at the checkin counter. However, for the actual travelling bit, you'll know need to use one at a time. (* ...


8

(I am assuming by China you mean the People's Republic of China.) In your case, the bigger problem than multiple passports is, according to Chinese nationality law (section 9), you automatically lose your Chinese citizenship when you voluntarily apply for and acquire another citizenship. So from a legal point of view, you are no longer a Chinese citizen, and ...


8

The Cuba Information Manual ("The Definitive Guide to Legal and Illegal Travel to Cuba") says: The embargo laws do not forbid U.S. citizens from traveling to Cuba. They do, however, forbid U.S. citizens from spending money there without the proper permits, which essentially amounts to the same thing—unless you plan on begging your way around the ...


8

As an American citizen you are required to the follow the laws of the USA despite any other nationality that you may have. Most laws don't apply to citizens residing abroad, but some do. Perhaps the most significant is paying taxes on world-wide income, but also includes participating in the selective service (military draft), reporting foreign bank account ...


8

You need a visa for neither country because you are a citizen of each. When you enter a country, in order not to need a visa, you show them the passport of that country. In your case, when arriving to Saudi Arabia, you show them the Saudi passport. When arriving to the UK, say after you get back, you show them the UK one. You obviously need to have both ...


8

Yes, you can travel, but you need to use both passports. This is going to be the third answer saying basically the same thing, but let me break it down into exact steps. When leaving the UK: Check in at the airport, show your Australian passport to airline staff. There is no exit immigration in the UK, so you do not need to show your Lebanese passport to ...


8

There is no international authority that sets any such limit, nor one which would have the ability to enforce it. But for most people, it is not practical to maintain too many multiple nationalities. Most countries frown upon multiple citizenships, and place some restrictions on it, at least on paper. Some countries, like Austria, only allow dual ...


8

Entering and leaving a country with different passports is indeed not advised. If the country uses computerized records (like the US), the entry and exit could conceivably fail to be matched and you risk being marked as an overstayer. If the country rely on stamps and checks passports on exit (like the Schengen area), border guards will demand to see the ...


7

Given that you are a dual citizen (British and Canadian) you can get a Canadian Passport at one of the Passport Canada Offices, which there are many around Toronto in 24 hours for C$110 and then as a Canadian citizen travel to the United States with no issues of Visas, ESTAs, VWPs or similar.


7

As an American citizen, you are bound by the laws and embargos of the U.S. no matter which passport you present. So, you would technically be breaking the law by visiting Cuba and spending money. As per the Treasury Cuba Sanctions Unless authorized by a general or specific license, any person subject to U.S. jurisdiction who engages in any Cuba ...


7

As long as you leave and enter on the same passport it is fine... for instance I have a South African and Swiss passport. Leave and enter SA on my SA passport and enter and leave Switzerland on my Swiss passport. No hassles! It does seem weird but for all the country cares you haven't left an airplane the whole time!


6

I have dual nationality (UK - Australia), and I always show both on departure. This stops them getting worried that they will have to deny me access to the flight because of visa issues. They should still only use one of them (the 'local' one) for their record keeping though. On arrival I just show the local one as that is less hassle for everyone.


6

Yes. That's the general rule for traveling as a dual national (or multiple national) -- entering and leaving one of the countries of nationality should be done with that country's passport. For other countries, use whichever passport is most convenient, but you should always enter and leave a country with the same passport.


6

No, you won't. Or at least, not more than any other British citizen crossing the border, which is to say you won't be denied entry but it will take you longer than a Canadian passport holder. At the border you will be treated as a British Citizen, which means fingerprinting, a greater degree of scrutiny and some forms to fill in, and a payment. Remember ...


6

The general rule about multiple passports is that you must always exit a country using the same passport that you used to enter. This implies that you cannot: enter the UK on your Lebanese passport leave the UK using your Australian passport enter the UK on your Australian passport because at that point, you have "entered" the UK twice with two different ...


6

First of all, Norwegian passports are relatively cheap. If you are older than 16, the passport fee is NOK 450 (appr 54€) and if you are younger, the fee is NOK 270 (appr 32€). The passport is valid for 10 years if you are older than 16, otherwise it is only issued for 5 years. According to the Chinese Embassy in Oslo, you must provide your original passport ...


5

You may need to clarify this with the consulate in Colombia but from what I can see online your daughter will be a Family Visitor traveling as a Colombian citizen, which means that she will need a visa to enter. So I would suggest that you apply not only for the British Birth certificate but also for a travel document for her to enter the UK as well.


5

Your friend seems to be out of luck. The Russian Consulate in San Francisco states quite clearly that former citizens of the USSR or successor states need to prove they are no longer Russian citizens: Former USSR and Russian citizens Applicants who used to be citizens of the USSR or of the Russian Federation and then emigrated from the USSR or ...


5

No, you are not allowed to do that. However, you do not need to enter Portugal on the same passport that you left the UK on. Since your Australian passport won't have any UK visa or entry stamps, you can't leave the UK on it. Conclusion: You need to leave the UK on your Lebanese passport. The Portuguese customs, will not know (and don't even care) where ...


5

There is no limit, in theory or practice. This thread on Flyertalk mentions several people with five citizenships, posits a case where a child born to a couple with three citizenships each would easily get 7, and goes on to speculate that with the right sets of parents it would be possible to acquire more than 9 at birth plus any more you'd care to ...


4

The nitty-gritty depends on the consular worker you encounter but then there is a different problem. If you look at the application that needs to be submitted to the Consulate for a VISA there are 2 different forms: Everyone except citizens of US, Great Britain, Canada, and Georgia Citizens of US, Great Britain, Canada, and Georgia You can take a look ...


4

I guess that answer might depends on the country you are living in. I am in a similar situation as you are and I am not aware of any nationality related issue. What seems to be an issue is that many insures require you to be a resident (not a citizen) of the country they are in. I am for example a Dutch citizen living in Belgium, but I can't get Dutch ...


4

I don't see what the problem with the scenario is - I can buy travel insurance by simply telling an insurer that my family and I will be in Spain for two weeks, and that we won't be taking part in any risky sports (skydiving etc) They don't ask whether it is booked through a single travel agent or whether we are organising every bit separately. I am ...


4

As an U.S. citizen the only way to enter in Cuba legally to the U.S eyes is by using the “people-to-people” program authorized by the OFAC. These trips are not touristic. It’s then illegal for you as U.S. citizen to enter Cuba no matter which passport to use, however you may enter and U.S. government will never know, but that will be illegal: If you fly to ...


4

Further to my comment and @Annoyed's answer - Here's what Smartraveller (the Australian government's travel advice site) says, If you hold another country's passport, seek advice about how it should be used. Take your Australian passport and use it to depart from and return to Australia. An Australian citizen cannot be granted a visa for Australia. ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible