New answers tagged

0

What matters is the country of residence. You did not write that explicitely but it sounds as if your friend might have been a Dutch resident (possibly "borrowing" his or her parents' car regularly). I have heard similar stories about German citizens driving a German car with a German driving license (not even close to the border), the issue is that the ...


2

Actually, I called a US Port of entry today, July 25, 2016, to inquire if my mom would be allowed entrance to the US without a passport. My mother, a US citizen, has been visiting with me in Canada and needs to get her passport renewed. A photocopy of her US passport is all they need for her to be allowed re-entry. Just in case, I am also going to bring ...


1

Inside the EU, the country of issue of your driving license should be irrelevant. What is important is that the registration of the car matches your country of residence. The police officer may assume that you are doing something irregular to evade taxes, but if you show the tunnel/ferry ticket with a reasonably recent date and some proof of residence, it'...


2

To accomodate the people living in/around Baarle-Nassau, there's bound to be some special rules between Belgium and the Netherlands, but I don't know them - but in general the rule is that a car should be registered in the country where it is used. The point is that taxes associated with the car are meant to contribute to the society that has expenses (e.g. ...


0

Is your foreign license in English? I spent literally years driving rental cars on and off in the US on my Australian license. The rental companies didn't care, and neither did the cops for the couple of times that I got pulled over - even for the one time I couldn't get off with a warning and I had to go to see the judge and pay a fine1. The only caveat ...


1

If vehicles are driving at 100km/h (= 60 mph) and the space between all of them is less than the length of your car, then they are all homicidal maniacs. Even assuming the are all "tailgating", their minimum reaction time will be about half a second, and at 100km/h they will travel about 14 meters in that distance. An average sized compact car is about 5 ...


3

Try to not get influenced by other drivers who are breaking the rules. It's 'his problem' he is tailgating and he will be at fault if he hits you. Driving a Smart people often do not want to let me get in front of them (has the reputation of slow car because it in fact does not accelerate that fast.) and what I do is turn on my signals a little early*, ...


2

You are planning a >2000km roadtrip across Morocco. You will be covering large cities as well as smaller rural town. You will spend most of your trip driving in rural, arid, areas. The road quality you will encounter will most probably vary from dual-carriageway asphalt to narrow strips of dusty roads. With all this in mind, I would have no doubts in opting ...


7

Easy. You slowly brake and wait for space in the main lanes of traffic. Should the driver behind you crash into your car, he would be considered at-fault in pretty much every jurisdiction out there as tailgating is strictly prohibited. Another thing you might do is flash your brake lights a few times to indicate your intentions. Hopefully this should ...


1

Mirrors are a very important aspect of driving, and if not set correctly navigating certain areas will become increasingly difficult. Set your mirrors to see your blind spots. A good way to start is to take your rear view mirror, and adjust the side mirrors so that for their relative side their visibility is barely touching the visibility of that side on ...


3

If there is traffic in the outer lane, I am stuck and I cannot exit. I can also not stop safely. Should I keep driving in circles in the inner lane until there is space to exit to the outer lane? In some countries, this is exactly what must be done. You must continue to make circles on the inner lane, until you can safely change it. You must be driving on ...


2

I did my car driving test in Spain (Barcelona) in 2010, and my motorcycle test there in 2012. In 2010, I was taught to always use the outside lane of the roundabout no matter which exit I was using, which is the situation as you describe. In 2012, I was taught to use the outside lane when going less than half a circle, and the inside lane when going more ...


3

The problem is that, for decades, driving schools taught us drivers this: Whenever two vehicles are inside a roundabout, the right of way ALWAYS belongs to the vehicle in the outer lane. Because of that, most people use the outer lane to turn, because by doing that they (supposedly) keep the right of way and any other cars in the inner lanes have to ...


8

In Australia the basics are: Give way to any traffic on the roundabout (REG 114) Drive off the lefthand side of the central island (REG 115) Follow the traffic lane arrows (REG 116) When entering the roundabout indicate Left if you are travelling less then half way round. (REG 112) Right if you are travelling more then half way round. (REG 113) When ...


8

As a Spanish, living in Spain and long time driver, I'd say the correct way is the one you describe you do in Britain (and it's the one I do when traffic permits)... ... with one caveat: don't know how it is in other places, but at least in Spain, on any collision, if one driver is switching lanes while the other is not, then the switcher driver is taken as ...


5

In Spain, rules are: You leave the roundabout always from the outer lane. Traffic outside the roundabout gives way to traffic inside the roundabout. Traffic changing lanes gives way to traffic in those lanes. See Guardia Civil* tweet here: https://twitter.com/guardiacivil/status/752190404221669376 (*) Police force in charge of road traffic in Spain, ...


2

Something to remind you: Seen in a rental car in Ireland, a sticker on the wind screen reminding the driver to drive on the left. If you do rent a car without such a sticker, or take a car to where the driving is on the other side of the road, you can make your own 'sticker'. My brother used a plaster (like you put on your finger when you cut yourself) ...


4

In the Netherlands you should always aim to take the right lane unless you are going left or a full round. It is not allowed to enter the roundabout right next to someone else as this can trouble them getting off. You can enter slightly in front of them or behind them. Exiting from the right lane is straightforward. You start signaling at the moment you ...


13

In the UK (which drives on the left), this is governed by rule 186 of the Highway Code: When taking the first exit to the left, unless signs or markings indicate otherwise signal left and approach in the left-hand lane keep to the left on the roundabout and continue signalling left to leave. When taking an exit to the right or going ...


6

While I was practicing to take my driving test, the teacher told me that the Highway Code had changed recently (I'm talking about a 2-3 years...I think) and now the inner lane of the roundabout was to be ignored. Before that the use of the inner lanes were as you mentioned, use outer lanes if you are near to your exit or use inner lane if you are going to ...


8

If there is traffic in the outer lane, I am stuck and I cannot exit. This is exactly the issue when the people doesn't obey the rule you should use inner lane for turning left or back. If the do, this won't happen, since people will leave roundabout before you, making place free for you. If there's no such rule (Spain - the example linked by you), simply ...


13

I found this article from the National Department of Traffic saying that most of the drivers don't drive correctly through roundabouts. I quote: 75% of the drivers ignore the use of each one of the lanes. 68% of drivers drive in an inadequate lane, affecting traffic fluidity, mainly using the outer lane when they want to exit to the left or perform a U-...


19

I can't say this is official, but sounds like a good explanation. The following explanation is taken from the Spanish equivalent of the Highway Code. “When there is more than one lane on a roundabout, you will normally travel around the roundabout in the right hand lane – the outside of the roundabout” So what exactly is the inside lane ...


4

You need special permits to cross from India or China to Myanmar; as the border is not open for free travel. The crossing point in India is at Moreh (image from NY Times): It is not possible to cross into Myanmar from Bangladesh (there are no borders). You need to obtain a visa in advance to cross into Myanmar. You can get this at the Myanmar embassy in ...


2

If it is still painted in military fashion, then yes it will attract all sorts of unwanted attention. If you have spruced in up a bit with civilian colors, etc, it will still attract attention but likely more out of curiosity. Have you checked the laws of each country you plan to traverse? A vehicle that size could come with commercial driver license ...


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Visit the driving laws digest of the Automobile Association of America: http://drivinglaws.aaa.com This site has a list of laws for all 50 US States, Puerto Rico, and all Canadian provinces. For instance, here is part of the list of traffic rules for Minnesota:


7

There is an EU directive about cross-border enforcement of traffic offenses covering speeding tickets (2015/413) but there are a couple of twists: First it needs to be implemented in national law (like all directives). The deadline for an earlier directive about that was in 2015 and I can vouch that it is now working well between Germany and France and the ...


8

There are two options. The easy way is cash, which is (at time of writing) still accepted by every toll plaza on every Japanese expressway: just collect a chit on entry and pay when you leave. But if you're driving longer distances or on multiple days, you'll want to look into getting set up for ETC (electronic toll collection, but called "ETC" even in ...


15

The barrier will wait for you - even for 10 minutes. As a safety matter, you absolutely must not rush. Take your time and correctly put away the coins, cards etc. Do not rush, for any reason. You mention you had to actually turn off the car, open the door, and step sideways to use the machine. This is utterly normal. I do it 100% of the time (just ...


87

I ride a motorcycle (I've never learned to drive a car) and I cannot imagine anything you could be doing in a car that takes as long as zipping up the riding suit, putting the gloves back on, putting the helmet front down, and getting ready to ride off (all whilst trying not to drop the bike on the giant diesel smear that nearly every tollbooth features). ...


21

From personal experience, you have more than 30 seconds at least. Normally, the bar does not go down unless a car passes through, so you don't need to hurry at all. You will find that after some instances, it will be much smoother too, and you won't need more than two or three seconds anyway; but don't stress yourself. Try to be considerate to the queue ...


12

First hone your driving skills. There is nothing really technical about stopping your car up close to the machine, just takes practice. Second when I am dealing with tolls (cash or card) I put my wallet on the seat next to me or center console, so it is easily accessible at each toll plaza. Not sure how toll tags work in France, but perhaps get one for ...


8

It's been a while for me since I was in Mongolia, but I'm quite sure that, in this context, 'jeep' still refers to anything that resembles a Jeep. When I was in Mongolia, the most popular 'jeeps', specifically for touring the country, were Russian made UAZ 'jeeps'. They tend to be quite similar to Jeeps. The kind I remember looked quite a bit like this.


4

"Jeep" originally referred to a small US Army scout vehicle built by Willys-Overland during WWII. More then 640,000 were produced and they were immensely popular with all Allied armies for their sturdiness, simplicity, and reliability. Since then, "Jeep" has been simultaneously a brand name (of both military and commercial vehicles) that changed hands from ...


0

The rental agency is the only one who can answer this question. Technically, you could be driving a stolen car. Note, many agencies automatically allow spouses and business associates to drive a car without being specifically authorized on the rental agreement. You have to ask the agency about this.


1

It's very difficult to predict the waiting time. As for pricing the differences are significant. Check out the pricing table here: Danish, English.


4

Roadtrippers might be what you are looking for. You enter the route you want to take, choose a distance from that route and the site will find things of interests according to what categories you selected. (Note that I am not aware if it works well outside the US. It's possible that the site won't find points of interest.)


3

I would put it like this: There is no general speed limit on the Autobahn, meaning that when there is no specific speed limit announced via signs, you can theoretically go as fast as you want (Nowadays though, there are speed limit signs on most sections of the Autobahn). This applies to any drivers, regardless of nationality. I would however recommend that,...


13

You nationality is irrelevant as far as German law is concerned. You can go as fast as you want unless there are signs telling you otherwise. Most of the Autobahn has these signs. Especially the Frankfurt area also has lots of radar speed traps. I wouldn't recommend going faster there. The "Richtgeschwindigkeit" of 130km/h is what you're supposed to go, ...


10

German speed limits come in two flavors: mandatory limits, exceeding which is punishable by a fine, and recommended limits (Richtgeschwindigkeit), which can be exceeded as long as you stay in control of the car. This also means that, if you have an accident while exceeding the recommended limit, you have increased liability. So the answers: Around 50% of ...


3

My problem was similar but different. I originally was an enthusiastic driver, but after a particularly frightening car accident resulting in serious injuries to my mother and myself, I became terrified of driving. I would try to drive and my mind would start imagining all the horrible types of accidents and deaths I could potentially experience. I would go ...


4

You stop being scared of things by being used to them, and driving is no exception. You can get used to it by doing it more. If you are terrified of driving in general, start by practicing in empty parking lots and country roads (preferably paved ones). You can ask a friend to take you if the route to the practice area is too scary. Some kinds of fear are ...



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