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87

I ride a motorcycle (I've never learned to drive a car) and I cannot imagine anything you could be doing in a car that takes as long as zipping up the riding suit, putting the gloves back on, putting the helmet front down, and getting ready to ride off (all whilst trying not to drop the bike on the giant diesel smear that nearly every tollbooth features). ...


21

From personal experience, you have more than 30 seconds at least. Normally, the bar does not go down unless a car passes through, so you don't need to hurry at all. You will find that after some instances, it will be much smoother too, and you won't need more than two or three seconds anyway; but don't stress yourself. Try to be considerate to the queue ...


19

I can't say this is official, but sounds like a good explanation. The following explanation is taken from the Spanish equivalent of the Highway Code. “When there is more than one lane on a roundabout, you will normally travel around the roundabout in the right hand lane – the outside of the roundabout” So what exactly is the inside lane ...


15

The barrier will wait for you - even for 10 minutes. As a safety matter, you absolutely must not rush. Take your time and correctly put away the coins, cards etc. Do not rush, for any reason. You mention you had to actually turn off the car, open the door, and step sideways to use the machine. This is utterly normal. I do it 100% of the time (just ...


13

In the UK (which drives on the left), this is governed by rule 186 of the Highway Code: When taking the first exit to the left, unless signs or markings indicate otherwise signal left and approach in the left-hand lane keep to the left on the roundabout and continue signalling left to leave. When taking an exit to the right or going ...


13

I found this article from the National Department of Traffic saying that most of the drivers don't drive correctly through roundabouts. I quote: 75% of the drivers ignore the use of each one of the lanes. 68% of drivers drive in an inadequate lane, affecting traffic fluidity, mainly using the outer lane when they want to exit to the left or perform a U-...


12

First hone your driving skills. There is nothing really technical about stopping your car up close to the machine, just takes practice. Second when I am dealing with tolls (cash or card) I put my wallet on the seat next to me or center console, so it is easily accessible at each toll plaza. Not sure how toll tags work in France, but perhaps get one for ...


11

Visit the driving laws digest of the Automobile Association of America: http://drivinglaws.aaa.com This site has a list of laws for all 50 US States, Puerto Rico, and all Canadian provinces. For instance, here is part of the list of traffic rules for Minnesota:


8

There are two options. The easy way is cash, which is (at time of writing) still accepted by every toll plaza on every Japanese expressway: just collect a chit on entry and pay when you leave. But if you're driving longer distances or on multiple days, you'll want to look into getting set up for ETC (electronic toll collection, but called "ETC" even in ...


8

As a Spanish, living in Spain and long time driver, I'd say the correct way is the one you describe you do in Britain (and it's the one I do when traffic permits)... ... with one caveat: don't know how it is in other places, but at least in Spain, on any collision, if one driver is switching lanes while the other is not, then the switcher driver is taken as ...


8

It's been a while for me since I was in Mongolia, but I'm quite sure that, in this context, 'jeep' still refers to anything that resembles a Jeep. When I was in Mongolia, the most popular 'jeeps', specifically for touring the country, were Russian made UAZ 'jeeps'. They tend to be quite similar to Jeeps. The kind I remember looked quite a bit like this.


8

If there is traffic in the outer lane, I am stuck and I cannot exit. This is exactly the issue when the people doesn't obey the rule you should use inner lane for turning left or back. If the do, this won't happen, since people will leave roundabout before you, making place free for you. If there's no such rule (Spain - the example linked by you), simply ...


8

In Australia the basics are: Give way to any traffic on the roundabout (REG 114) Drive off the lefthand side of the central island (REG 115) Follow the traffic lane arrows (REG 116) When entering the roundabout indicate Left if you are travelling less then half way round. (REG 112) Right if you are travelling more then half way round. (REG 113) When ...


7

Easy. You slowly brake and wait for space in the main lanes of traffic. Should the driver behind you crash into your car, he would be considered at-fault in pretty much every jurisdiction out there as tailgating is strictly prohibited. Another thing you might do is flash your brake lights a few times to indicate your intentions. Hopefully this should ...


7

There is an EU directive about cross-border enforcement of traffic offenses covering speeding tickets (2015/413) but there are a couple of twists: First it needs to be implemented in national law (like all directives). The deadline for an earlier directive about that was in 2015 and I can vouch that it is now working well between Germany and France and the ...


6

While I was practicing to take my driving test, the teacher told me that the Highway Code had changed recently (I'm talking about a 2-3 years...I think) and now the inner lane of the roundabout was to be ignored. Before that the use of the inner lanes were as you mentioned, use outer lanes if you are near to your exit or use inner lane if you are going to ...


5

In Spain, rules are: You leave the roundabout always from the outer lane. Traffic outside the roundabout gives way to traffic inside the roundabout. Traffic changing lanes gives way to traffic in those lanes. See Guardia Civil* tweet here: https://twitter.com/guardiacivil/status/752190404221669376 (*) Police force in charge of road traffic in Spain, ...


5

Inside the EU, the country of issue of your driving license should be irrelevant. What is important is that the registration of the car matches your country of residence. And even so, it only really matters in your own country of residence ; you can go on holiday to Italy from Sweden and rent a car there. The police officer may assume that you are doing ...


4

You need special permits to cross from India or China to Myanmar; as the border is not open for free travel. The crossing point in India is at Moreh (image from NY Times): It is not possible to cross into Myanmar from Bangladesh (there are no borders). You need to obtain a visa in advance to cross into Myanmar. You can get this at the Myanmar embassy in ...


4

"Jeep" originally referred to a small US Army scout vehicle built by Willys-Overland during WWII. More then 640,000 were produced and they were immensely popular with all Allied armies for their sturdiness, simplicity, and reliability. Since then, "Jeep" has been simultaneously a brand name (of both military and commercial vehicles) that changed hands from ...


4

In the Netherlands you should always aim to take the right lane unless you are going left or a full round. It is not allowed to enter the roundabout right next to someone else as this can trouble them getting off. You can enter slightly in front of them or behind them. Exiting from the right lane is straightforward. You start signaling at the moment you ...


3

Try to not get influenced by other drivers who are breaking the rules. It's 'his problem' he is tailgating and he will be at fault if he hits you. Driving a Smart people often do not want to let me get in front of them (has the reputation of slow car because it in fact does not accelerate that fast.) and what I do is turn on my signals a little early*, ...


3

If there is traffic in the outer lane, I am stuck and I cannot exit. I can also not stop safely. Should I keep driving in circles in the inner lane until there is space to exit to the outer lane? In some countries, this is exactly what must be done. You must continue to make circles on the inner lane, until you can safely change it. You must be driving on ...


3

Actually, I called a US Port of entry today, July 25, 2016, to inquire if my mom would be allowed entrance to the US without a passport. My mother, a US citizen, has been visiting with me in Canada and needs to get her passport renewed. A photocopy of her US passport is all they need for her to be allowed re-entry. Just in case, I am also going to bring ...


3

The problem is that, for decades, driving schools taught us drivers this: Whenever two vehicles are inside a roundabout, the right of way ALWAYS belongs to the vehicle in the outer lane. Because of that, most people use the outer lane to turn, because by doing that they (supposedly) keep the right of way and any other cars in the inner lanes have to ...


3

To accomodate the people living in/around Baarle-Nassau, there's bound to be some special rules between Belgium and the Netherlands, but I don't know them - but in general the rule is that a car should be registered in the country where it is used. The point is that taxes associated with the car are meant to contribute to the society that has expenses (e.g. ...


2

If it is still painted in military fashion, then yes it will attract all sorts of unwanted attention. If you have spruced in up a bit with civilian colors, etc, it will still attract attention but likely more out of curiosity. Have you checked the laws of each country you plan to traverse? A vehicle that size could come with commercial driver license ...


2

You are planning a >2000km roadtrip across Morocco. You will be covering large cities as well as smaller rural town. You will spend most of your trip driving in rural, arid, areas. The road quality you will encounter will most probably vary from dual-carriageway asphalt to narrow strips of dusty roads. With all this in mind, I would have no doubts in opting ...


2

Something to remind you: Seen in a rental car in Ireland, a sticker on the wind screen reminding the driver to drive on the left. If you do rent a car without such a sticker, or take a car to where the driving is on the other side of the road, you can make your own 'sticker'. My brother used a plaster (like you put on your finger when you cut yourself) ...


2

I did my car driving test in Spain (Barcelona) in 2010, and my motorcycle test there in 2012. In 2010, I was taught to always use the outside lane of the roundabout no matter which exit I was using, which is the situation as you describe. In 2012, I was taught to use the outside lane when going less than half a circle, and the inside lane when going more ...



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