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16

Was it ever a tourist destination? Not known for it, no. Generally tourism requires some infrastructure and base population to support it. The islands consist of five uninhabited islets and three barren rocks. This is not to say that people haven't lived there or tried to occupy in the past. They've been used at various stages as: fishing islands a ...


13

Unfortunately in this case common sense trumps political pride: entering Taiwan is considered leaving China, and you'll thus need a multiple-entry visa to get back to the mainland. (Incidentally, the same applies to Hong Kong and Macau.) I'm having trouble finding an authoritative source, but this random Chinese visa agent (apparently banned here, replace ...


12

There are 192 members by the UN (193 if you count the Vatican, which is an observer without voting rights). There are 196 that qualify as 'independent countries'. List of countries by capital. Arguments via about.com This is debatable. For instance, I would say Taiwan is a country... many people would disagree with me. Scotland and Wales I would not count ...


10

The situation is very complicated. Georgia says that Abkhazia and South Ossetia are Georgian territories, and you can go there from Georgia by this border crossing: to South Ossetia from Gori - my friends from Germany made a trip this year. If you get into these territories not by these points, you would get problems (fee from $1200 or jail up to 5 ...


9

Having some passport not recognized by some country is not that unusual. It's pretty much certain to happen somewhere for passports of countries with partial recognition. Someone else mentioned passports of Northern Cyprus (which is only recognized by Turkey), which according to Wikipedia, is only accepted in 6 countries. But there are many other countries ...


9

The Travelers' Century Club, or TCC, is a club for people who have visited 100 or more countries. However these guys have their own definition of a country, from Wikipedia: The TCC has a fairly loose definition of what constitutes a country and has established its own list of currently 321 "countries". This includes not only sovereign states but ...


8

I don't think its possible. When we went there last year they insisted on placing a full-page sticker visa into our passports. You might be lucky, but I don't think there is an official way to get it done.


8

The situation is very complicated. Georgia says that Abkhazia and South Ossetia are Georgian territories, and you can go there from Georgia by this border crossing: to Abkhazia from Zugdidi - my friends from Germany made such trip this year. But they say that they got some local help for the border-crossing, because Abkhazia trying to close the border to ...


8

The two most authoritative answers are from United Nations already mentioned, and from FIFA which counts 208 members.


8

I am using the Globetrotterslogbook to keep track of where I have been. Nice feature is that they also distinguish dependencies and overseas territories, making it possible to even track the journey dreamed about in the "most remote exclave" question


7

Yes this is possible 100%. I just came back from a visit to Armenia and Nagorno Karabagh. The visa agent at Nagorno Karabagh will ask you if you want to have the visa on a separate paper. This is very common since most foreign visitors will prefer it this way. That was my experience. If one agent forgets to ask just ask it yourself, they are willing to do ...


6

This story about a man who visited Bir Tawil (and claimed it as the "Kingdom of North Sudan" so his 8-year-old girl could be a princess, but that's another story) says that permission for the Egyptian authorities was required: This research led Heaton to seek permission from Egyptian authorities to travel to the remote, unpopulated plot of sand, ...


6

You can also get a visa in Transnistria, which might be an interesting place to visit for you as you seem to be keen on countries with legal definition problems. The Wikipedia article seems not to be totally up-to-date with that information as it says there are only 2 embassies abroad (Russia and Venezuela). Although I must admit that I didn t see it myself ...


5

One case I know is Northern Cyprus. In the wake of the 1974 invasion, Turkey created a new state that still administers a part of the island. That state is recognized (and strongly influenced) by Turkey. Its situation (generally unrecognized but accepted by another country) is therefore in a way the “reverse” of Israel's situation (widely recognized but ...


4

You might be able to get a second passport from your Government. Some, like the UK, do this due to this problem.


3

People's Republic of China doesn't recognize Taiwan passports (Republic of China passports). Taiwan in turn doesn't recognize passports issued by PRC. See Wikipedia: Mainland Travel Permit for Taiwan Residents


3

There is the Principality of Huttriver, which isn't recognized by the Australian authorities, yet its prince seems to travel on a Hutt passport: BRENDAN HUTCHENS: The Prince still travels abroad on his Hutt River passport, as do the principality's citizens, who have many stories to tell from passport control. Source


3

I tried to get into South Ossetia from Gori, in May 2008. Less than 3 months Before the 5-day-war. When I got to the checkpoint on the Georgian side, the military asked me what I was doing there "Do you know there is a war going on here" he said. Well he was right - 2 month later. So I would like to say. No way you can get into Soth Ossetia from Gori today. ...


3

In April 2012 I entered Abkhazia from Zugdidi on EU passport with a printed Abkhazian permission from their Ministry of Foreign Affairs. You just have to e-mail them and you should get it back within few days. There's a bridge over the Ingur river. You have to walk 1km or so between the checkpoints and then you can catch a local bus forward on. I left to ...


3

Mali has refused to acknowledge the Azawadi Declaration of Independence and so the visa that you get (as per Mali rules) will entitle you to visit Timbuktu (so you can get the visa from Mali Consulate). However, the real trouble will be getting inside Timbuktu on that visa as it is now a part of Azawadi and the local authority might deny you entry as they no ...


3

The David Gareja monastery area is very close to the border between Georgia and Azerbaijan, a few hundred meters away. If you went wandering in the hills, it's quite possible that you might enter Azerbaijan. The border is disputed. While the two countries agree on where the official border lays, Georgia contends that this location was artificially imposed ...


2

Sorry all links but one is in Russian. As far as I can tell the official stance on the Border crossings between South Ossetia and Georgia is that there is none so officially you can't cross between Georgia and South Ossetia be it in Gori or otherwise. The only way you can officially visit South Ossetia would be if you enter through Russia and you can cross ...


2

Updates now state that the MLNA has given up on the Azawadian independence: Whatever happened to Azawad? Wikipedia entry on Azawad After renewed fighting has pushed much of the MLNA into other battles, as well as the African Union refusing to accept it, it would appear that it's a lost cause, and is viewed on Wikipedia as a 'former' rogue state. This ...



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