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22

I can't say that I completely understand your situation (I am, after all, of European descent), but you should not be surprised to find out that Some people are stupid have prejudices I have indeed been treated sometimes differently for being Eastern European (and proud of it!), and the thing that I found works best is to just ignore them and pretend that ...


21

The short answer is: no, you can't, but it's really not a problem. I assume your profile picture is accurate, and you are a white male. The Western notion that everybody should get an even break, regardless of background or appearance, just doesn't exist here in Japan. The Japanese feel entitled to judge according to appearances. White men have a role ...


19

It's a pub staffed by Filipina hostesses. All offer drinks and conversation, most do karaoke (Filipinos love their karaoke!), some have dancing and shows. The term itself doesn't connotate sexual services, although the virtue of some ladies may well be negotiable after-hours. The phenomenon started when the bursting of Japan's economic bubble led to a ...


14

Japan is a much more culturally and racially homogeneous society than the US, and within the Japanese population, people enjoy lower barriers to trust because of these shared norms. I remember once when I was a kid, me and my family were flying to Japan, and my Japanese mom started chatting with a Japanese lady in the seat next to her. A few hours later, the ...


12

Not at all. I lived in Georgia from November 2011 to May 2012 and there were lots of people visiting from nearby Muslim and Arab countries. In fact Georgia seemed one of the easiest countries to travel to for various Muslim and Arab countries going by conversations I had with people I met while working there in a backpacker hostel. I think in terms of ...


12

It's hard to make general statements about this issue because it's different for every region, business and individual. I'll just list some points: In general, explicit discrimination (i.e. a sign "Japanese customers only") is rare, I don't think there are any "places where a significant proportion of establishments discriminate against foreigners". The ...


10

Wasn't aware of any discrimination what so ever when I traveled in Japan. I was told that foreigners weren't allowed in some hotels. Personally I was never rejected. My guess it is as common as in any other country. Maybe I am just too thick to have noticed any. In that case you have your answer, just be as thick ;) Actually I would say the opposite. People ...


8

Namaste MeNoTalk! In my experience, and my opinion, behaving in a friendly and respectful AND assertive manner goes a long way. I am a what people would call a "white South African", and have travelled in Turkey, Greece, Egypt and Indonesia, to name a few. In spite of dressing modestly (long skirts, arms completely covered and hair covered) I was ...


7

I will speak on this topic based on my own experience of having lived here in Japan for 8 years as well as being familiar with the experiences of many other non-Japanese people: One of the most important things to note here is that Japanese society strongly encourages people not to give voice to judgements they have about people who are not in their ...


7

There is explicit discrimination in some places, but these are based on the behavior of the foreigners in the past. When you try to rent an apartment, sometimes foreigners are explicitly rejected (sometimes in written form in advertisement). The reason varies for different nationalities of people. The major concern a landlord has with Westerners, ...


6

I lived in Japan for a year and a half in the mid 90's. I was, at the time, fairly fluent in Japanese and very respectful of their customs. I remember one night, a few friends and I were out on the town and we stopped outside a bar and started talking to the doorman. After several minutes of friendly chatting in Japanese, we started to walk inside. ...


6

This trip, I stayed in Sapporo, Zao Onsen, Sendai, and a few nights in Tokyo. Outside of the adult entertainment industry, and a store that sold weapons inter alia, I didn't face any discrimination on the basis of race or nationality. I went to bars in all of these locations, and didn't have any problems. I went to onsen in Zao Onsen, Tsuru no yu onsen, and ...


6

First of all, reading Debito.org will give you quite a misleading picture of Japan. The guy's on a crusade to ferret out every piece of discrimination and "discrimination" he can and, while I respect some of the stuff he's done, he goes way overboard at times. So the good news is that as a white guy, you've very unlikely to run into overt discrimination. ...


6

I'd like to preface this with saying that I don't agree with the prejudice but I acknowledge the fact that it exists and with that painful point in mind here are my thoughts and advice. The bad news is without actual interaction, it's really hard to change somebody's silent prejudice. To put people at ease around you that you are not going to actually speak ...


5

What criteria would you use to label people xenophobic? And would these criteria really reflect your own experience visiting these places? In an article on xenophobia in European cities published in "Business Insider", the criterion is the answer "strongly/somewhat disagree" to the statement "The presence of foreigners is good for the city" in the EU survey ...


5

While a different type of attention, as a blond Caucasian people would stare when I was walking around South America, and point, and you'd hear "gringo, gringo" and often some choice words after that. A few cheery words back in my awful Spanish would get a laugh and they'd carry on as per normal. I had a friend who was of Sri Lankan descent, who grew a ...


4

There's no hard/fast way to measure this. Do you do it on race? Or just foreigners? Or how they're treated in their country? Or the distribution of race in a country? One international means of 'measuring' might be to look at the "Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination" - a document with 86 signatories and 175 parties. Several ...


4

One does not simply measure xenophobia. There is this long forum thread: Name the most/least xenophobic countries. This article, These 20 cities may be the most xenophobic in Europe, uses a survey (PDF in article). A black friend of mine told me that it was not possible for him to go to Russia because of racism, some internet research backs that up. ...


3

1) Yes, they still exist, if you google for the term you will find websites of such bars. 2) They are essentially normal bars with elevated prices. It is not directly a part of the sex industry since the bar as such is not directly involved in prostitution. But I guess one can debate what the definition of "Sex industry" is. Please note that there are tons ...


3

In this museum in India, different fees are charged for Indians versus foreigners (₹10/150), and there's a fee for using a camera (₹50), which foreigners are more likely to do than locals. I assume that fees are based on the ability to pay, and foreigners are more likely to be able to pay more. At Yuransen Onsen in Japan, there were different onsens for ...


3

The sign you're looking for: (source - although the image weirdly isn't showing up there, the post is, and I found it through google image search, but giving the site credit anyway)


3

Well...this is difficult to answer, because how many is 'common'? However, I've stayed in hostels in Australia, New Zealand, all over Europe, Central and northern Asia, USA/Canada and South America, and I can't recall a time that I've seen them charge EXTRA for female dorms - EXCEPT when there were fewer beds. Now, it's fairly common to charge more for ...


2

As a traveler, you will not experience discrimination in Japan. Japnaese are clever people, and can tell if you have lived in Japan for a long time. If they feel you are a "gaijin" meaning you live in Japan but your not Japanese, then they will treat you as an outcast. gaijin means outcast or outsider; it has its roots in an ancient caste system leftover ...


2

One of the assumptions I had was that banning a subset of a group (eg Russians) is less discriminatory than banning the whole group (eg all foreigners). That may have been an incorrect assumption. When all foreigners are banned, it's like "we like nihonjin", whereas if a particular group were banned, it'd be like "we remember when your mates trashed the ...


2

It used to be very common in China. One time I had been there long enough that I read the Chinese price on a sign first without paying attention to the English, and handed over the (I thought) appropriate amount. The poor girl had to explain that I had to fork over 10x as much as a gweilo. These days the price seems to have gone up at most places to the ...


2

This is very common in Thailand, so much so that there's an entire website devoted to the topic: 2PriceThailand.com. This is particularly easy to do in Thailand, since the Thai script has a native set of numerals. This means you can have ENTRANCE 100 BAHT right next to the Thai sign saying ๒๐ บาท, and the vast majority of farang visitors won't even realize ...


2

It's common enough in Australia, with very sensible reasoning behind it - the tourists are only going to visit your attraction once. The locals can keep coming back (and often bringing visitors as extras) because they don't have the travel cost. Skyrail is an example that springs to mind. Although they don't advertise it on their website, they have ...


1

I think you looked at the first page only. The first question on the second page of the form you linked to is Name and nationality of mother.


1

I think this is quite common in some Asia countries. For example here in Thailand it is the same, even though my parents are now long dead I have to list them on various forms. In the case of India I think they love bureaucracy, it is an old habit and keeps lots of people in jobs I guess. Blame it on the Brits I suppose, though overall I think they helped.


1

I don't know why India asks for it - but I do know that in some countries the name of the guardian (either the husband for women or father for males and unmarried girls) is part of your passport identification page. This is checked when you are traveling - for example, if I am to sponsor my wife's visa, her passport must state my name under ...



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