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104

As a white, Christian, American person I can definitely say that nobody would (perhaps should) be offended by your dietary restrictions. I have a number of friends who are vegetarians for no reason other than they decided they wanted to be. In my opinion, that is far less sacrosanct than religious reasons, and I have always made sure to accommodate them when ...


59

Not rude here in the UK, or anywhere in the western world so far as I'm aware. It is polite, though, to tell your host at an early enough opportunity that they haven't already bought the ingredients and cooked the meal! Really you don't have to just ask them what's in the meal so much as tell them your dietary requirements - it would be inconsiderate of ...


45

I have requested many times vegan/vegetarian meals. Normally they are pretty well organized and you won't have to ask for the meal. My strategy is just to wait and if I am given the normal food, then I politely remind them I have a special arrangement. In hundred of flights, this has only happened maybe 1 or 2 times. In most airlines, they will deliver the ...


36

I can not answer for the average USA person, but I can answer for the Dutch and likely also for those of Dutch descent who still hold most of their Dutch habits. For us the worst question is the one that is not asked but should have been asked. If you can ask before the cooking is done, like a few days ahead of time when you are invited, your question will ...


33

Last year, I was in the Middle East (in one of the countries where pork and alcohol are available, at least in major hotels) and I invited a colleague to dinner at the hotel restaurant one evening. This person happened to be deeply religious. Before accepting my invitation, he asked me, very apologetically, if I had any plans to consume alcohol at the table, ...


23

I am a Christian born and living in Lebanon which is a country populated with an almost 1:1 ratio of Christians to Muslims. I have as much Muslim friends and as I have Christians and we invite each other for meals all the time, and almost always my Muslim friends ask if the food contain any alcohol or pork. This is very normal to a point that I don't ...


21

No, it would never be considered rude to inquire after the contents of food being offered for your consumption, whether for religious or health reasons, as long as you yourself are not rude in your manner of inquiry. "I'm personally deeply religious and my faith precludes me eating pork, or consuming any alcohol; may I ask if you were planning on using any ...


14

Not rude at all! Even more : the substances you've mentioned are potential causes of an allergic reactions and conditions, so it's nothing bad in asking if there's such a substance in the food you're about to eat.


14

I know this question has been covered pretty extensively, but I thought I would put in my two cents worth: If a dish is prepared with alcohol, and there is just the taste of the alcohol left, sometimes just the taste of alcohol can be deadly to a person who is an alcoholic and is trying to stay away from abusing it. So whether or not it is burned off is ...


10

A a westerner who doesn't eat onions, it's fine to tell someone you can't eat something, but do it in a nice way, and ask far ahead of time.


10

Are Allergies Rude? Imagine you were allergic to, say, garlic. Would you feel rude to mention this to your host? In my opinion you should not. Similarly, should not feel rude when mentioning any other dietary restriction or preference, regardless of the reason behind it. It makes no sense to compare the importance of one dietary restriction over the other, ...


10

A full list of special meals types is available on wikipedia. Not every one is available on every airline, for example here is Etihad's selection. There are quite a number of meal types that are vegetarian, so you don't have to restrict yourself to just the normal VLML, and might want to try one of the others for a change: VGML - Vegetarian Meal (usually ...


8

Here's a site showing various electronic devices and a manual solution (test strips) that seems to solve your problem: https://mysugr.com/diet-drink-really-diet-check-sugar/ 100 test strips for $25 with the suggestion that you can cut them in half to last longer. That would probably last you a few trips and give you peace of mind. Here's another (old) site ...


7

(expanded from my comment above) Background: I am an atheist and will-eat-all-that-stays-in-my-plate. I can also understand that some people find some food disgusting and would prefer not to eat rather than witness that. This can be pork, alcohol, cheese, dogs, reptiles, humans - whatever. My son has an almost-vomit reaction to cheese (and yes, we are ...


7

I'm a vegetarian and in every int'l flight I've ever been on, they hand out the special-diet meals first. It's an extra perk. On my last flight the woman next to me asked why mine was first then figured she'd do the same next time she flew...just to get her food faster :)


6

In addition to this post http://travel.stackexchange.com/a/70930/4584 I also recommend you confirming this when collecting your boarding pass. I once flew with a diabetic mate of mine and despite instructions when booking and confirming again with their customer care, his request for a vegetarian meal was not honored in Delta Airlines. Flying from Dallas ...


6

If you feel too shy for even the suggestions already given, how about, “I appreciate the invitation, but I have too many dietary restrictions to bother you with.”


6

There have been a lot of excellent answers, and I agree with all/many/most of them. However, to simplify matters: it is as rude as informing people of dietary allergies. You can't/won't eat something for whatever reason. Personally, I cannot tolerate mushrooms, simply for their texture. Sometimes I lie and tell people that I am allergic. More often, I ...


5

As others have said if there are items that you must, or wish to, avoid then politely stating so as soon as possible, possibly including giving the host a chance to withdraw the invitation if the restrictions are severe or contrary to point of the invitation, e.g. Shellfish allergy at a clam bake or pork at a hog roast. Do be prepared to need to clarify the ...


5

It's best to take some extra food with you. There may be problems with the food they serve, or it may not be enough. I always do this because I eat way more than average while on planes they serve minuscule amounts of food. On the plane I'll eat whatever is served first, keeping the food I've brought with me as reserve for later.


5

Hmm, I don't think so. By the website wording, I inferred that they want you to contact them. On their website it says (direct quote): If you have a special dietary requirement for medical or religious reasons, or you may be travelling with small children, we can provide a suitable alternative meal if this is requested sufficiently in time - at least 24 ...


4

Happy-cow let's you find vegetarian, vegan and veg-friendly places in Paris and a lot more cities. It shows the results in a map (allowing some interesting options as choosing just those places that are currently open) and a list ordered by distance/rating/price or some other criteria. It also allows you to post reviews, making it easier to choose when ...


4

No, it is not rude (unless the inquiry itself is made in an obnoxious way). People have all sorts of dietary restrictions for any number of reasons (religious/cultural, allergies, interaction with medications, other medical conditions, etc.) After all consuming food is an intimate act and no one should expect anyone to ignore what they are putting into ...


3

You could acclimatize yourself to raw fish now. I am not a big fan of fish and I do not find it hard to avoid fish products when I'm in Japan (although I suppose I could be consuming them unwittingly). In most large, commercial places the Japanese are quite accepting of foreigners' strange requirements, although in the smaller restaurants and bars where ...


3

I request a vegetarian meal for every flight and I highly recommend to make the request by phone. This seems to be the most effective method of ensuring you will actually get a vegetarian meal. When ordering the meal on the airline website, it has happened to me before that my order got lost and I did not get my meal. Simply look up the customer service ...


2

According to La Fourchette, which is a website where you can find all the restaurants in France, the only Vegan restaurant in the 5th arrondissement of Paris is "Le Puits de Légumes". I leave it to you to use La Fourchette to find others! Around the 5th, you have the 6th, the 4th and the 13th arrondissements.


2

Mentioning this at the time of the invitation is indeed ok. The problem might be in mentioning this while eating and causing an awkward situation. The hosts might feel bad if they cooked and then you simply do not eat.


1

The alcohol one and the pork one are, in my mind, different questions. Most dishes cooked with alcohol do not have alcohol in them. Alcohol is only part of the cooking process, but the alcohol itself boils away extremely quickly and 100% thoroughly. You usually can eat a big dish of whatever cooked with tons of booze and never blow numbers. So they aren't ...



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