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104

As a white, Christian, American person I can definitely say that nobody would (perhaps should) be offended by your dietary restrictions. I have a number of friends who are vegetarians for no reason other than they decided they wanted to be. In my opinion, that is far less sacrosanct than religious reasons, and I have always made sure to accommodate them when ...


59

Not rude here in the UK, or anywhere in the western world so far as I'm aware. It is polite, though, to tell your host at an early enough opportunity that they haven't already bought the ingredients and cooked the meal! Really you don't have to just ask them what's in the meal so much as tell them your dietary requirements - it would be inconsiderate of ...


36

I can not answer for the average USA person, but I can answer for the Dutch and likely also for those of Dutch descent who still hold most of their Dutch habits. For us the worst question is the one that is not asked but should have been asked. If you can ask before the cooking is done, like a few days ahead of time when you are invited, your question will ...


33

Last year, I was in the Middle East (in one of the countries where pork and alcohol are available, at least in major hotels) and I invited a colleague to dinner at the hotel restaurant one evening. This person happened to be deeply religious. Before accepting my invitation, he asked me, very apologetically, if I had any plans to consume alcohol at the table, ...


23

Only barely. Vegetarianism in general and veganism in particular is very poorly understood in Japan, and this r/japan thread goes into gruesome detail on what a world of pain you're about to find yourself in.The one vegetarian sushi place I'm aware of in Tokyo (Potager) has now closed. The only vegan items you are likely to encounter in the average sushi ...


23

I am a Christian born and living in Lebanon which is a country populated with an almost 1:1 ratio of Christians to Muslims. I have as much Muslim friends and as I have Christians and we invite each other for meals all the time, and almost always my Muslim friends ask if the food contain any alcohol or pork. This is very normal to a point that I don't ...


22

Seafood allergies are a big issue in Japan, vegetarianism is often hard to deal with, a strong allergy to shrimp will cause problems unless you know what not to eat and are prepared to tell the waiter your needs in Japanese. If you rely on English skills only and do not avoid special types of food, you will have a problem, guaranteed. My first ...


21

No, it would never be considered rude to inquire after the contents of food being offered for your consumption, whether for religious or health reasons, as long as you yourself are not rude in your manner of inquiry. "I'm personally deeply religious and my faith precludes me eating pork, or consuming any alcohol; may I ask if you were planning on using any ...


19

My wife is also allergic to seafood and found the last time we went a pain due to dashi (literally stock, but for the most part fish / seafood stock) finding its way into a whole load of unexpected places. My Japanese isn’t awful but I don’t trust myself to be able to explain this properly to a waiter/waitress. This time we’re taking explanatory flash cards ...


17

You (as well as PLL, who commented and RoboKaren, who answered) need to straighten the confusion here. On the one hand, there is "sushi" (let's call this sushi1), which is an American food, hinted from Japanese cuisine and originated in California, and is usually served by Korean-Americans, Chinese-Americans, or other Americans. It uses normal rice, and is ...


17

Vegan is more than possible in Japan. There are a number of blogs on the topic that I suggest you look at. In terms of the specifics of a sushi restaurant, the vegan basics are: Kappa maki - cucumber roll  カッパ巻き Natto maki - roll with natto 納豆巻き Abokado nigiri/maki - avocado nigiri or maki アボカドにぎり Ume shiso maki - Plums paste with shiso herbs -- see ...


15

Having been to both during Ramadan: In all reasonably touristy areas in Thailand, including the southern resort islands, you basically will not notice Ramadan at all -- pretty much everything is open as usual. Malaysia, though, is a different story. While you certainly can get drinks and food, most places that stay open do so a little discreetly, with ...


14

Not rude at all! Even more : the substances you've mentioned are potential causes of an allergic reactions and conditions, so it's nothing bad in asking if there's such a substance in the food you're about to eat.


14

I know this question has been covered pretty extensively, but I thought I would put in my two cents worth: If a dish is prepared with alcohol, and there is just the taste of the alcohol left, sometimes just the taste of alcohol can be deadly to a person who is an alcoholic and is trying to stay away from abusing it. So whether or not it is burned off is ...


10

Potatoes are gluten-free and Peru is known to be the origin land of potatoes. It is still a basic element of Peruvian food.


10

A a westerner who doesn't eat onions, it's fine to tell someone you can't eat something, but do it in a nice way, and ask far ahead of time.


9

In the UK, there are a wide variety of non dairy "milks" for sale, and all chain coffee shops offer soy. There are also lactose free dairy milks in stores. Unsure about the other countries in the list, but would anticipate major supermarkets stocking it


9

There's an interesting read on what to expect at VeganCuba.com It's more towards Vegans than just vegetarians, so some of it may be relevant to you. The Havana Times newspaper has published a great piece a couple of years ago entitled "A Vegetarian in Cuba" (I'm hearing that to the tune of Sting's "Englishman in New York"). It's written by a local, and ...


9

In all the countries you have listed, soy milk is easy enough to find; most supermarkets will sell it. In France, you should be able to find it in Super U, Auchan, and Carrefour, and maybe in some Aldi and Lidl too if they're big enough. In Switzerland, I got many links to Reform Haus; you can find those in most of the northern part of the country. In ...


9

Are Allergies Rude? Imagine you were allergic to, say, garlic. Would you feel rude to mention this to your host? In my opinion you should not. Similarly, should not feel rude when mentioning any other dietary restriction or preference, regardless of the reason behind it. It makes no sense to compare the importance of one dietary restriction over the other, ...


8

I hope these links from the official Korea Tourism Organisation website, visitkorea, will help you: Muslim Food Guide Religious concerns / Halal Restaurants in Korea


8

If you were willing to pay approx. 8–9 euros for lunch, there would be lots of good options. For example: Satkar Kamppi (Nepalese restaurant, tripadvisor, home page): vegetarian options in the lunch menu for 8.40 euros. Note that the quoted prices in the lunch menus are precisely what you will pay (assuming you drink water). There are no additional taxes ...


8

Yes, I've seen it (and various other non-diary milks) in markets (even smallish ones) in the UK, the Netherlands, and France — coincidentally, because I don't actually drink soy milk. So I'm thinking if it's so common that I remember seeing it even though I don't look for it, it must be fairly common. It may be useful to take a list with you of ...


8

I went to Japan on Feb. 2014, I am allergic to shellfish. I did a lot of research. First thing, it is illegal to bring an epi-pen to Japan and almost impossible to get a special permit to get them in the country. I got the printed card and also a pandora charm that said I was allergic to shellfish. I carried with me Benadryl everywhere. Server at restaurants ...


8

Here's a site showing various electronic devices and a manual solution (test strips) that seems to solve your problem: https://mysugr.com/diet-drink-really-diet-check-sugar/ 100 test strips for $25 with the suggestion that you can cut them in half to last longer. That would probably last you a few trips and give you peace of mind. Here's another (old) site ...


7

Either you've been misinformed, or we're travelling on different airlines... For a flight I have next week, I've just logged into the "Manage My Booking" section of the airline's website (BA). Once I pick the flight, I see this: By picking the Special Requirements link, I can request a special meal, and additionally on the right hand menu of special ...


7

Airlines provide special meals as an accommodation for special needs (religious, medical, etc), not as an a la carte option. As such they make it something you have to request direct, to indirectly limit it to those who really need it. Allowing passengers to essentially order a la carte online makes catering the flight more difficult and more expensive. ...


6

I just remember, that I was actually vegetarian when I was on Cuba in 2004. I did a package tour for one week and we ate at tourist restaurants where they always had vegetarian options, but most of the time it was an omelette! Some of the black beans with rice were really tasty but you get tired of them after a while. Fried plantains and basics salads were ...


6

If you feel too shy for even the suggestions already given, how about, “I appreciate the invitation, but I have too many dietary restrictions to bother you with.”


6

(expanded from my comment above) Background: I am an atheist and will-eat-all-that-stays-in-my-plate. I can also understand that some people find some food disgusting and would prefer not to eat rather than witness that. This can be pork, alcohol, cheese, dogs, reptiles, humans - whatever. My son has an almost-vomit reaction to cheese (and yes, we are ...



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