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34

My personal experience has been that it's best to get a SIM card for each country I travel in. Local providers almost always have the best deals, and buying SIM cards is relatively inexpensive. Especially in Asian countries (where I have more travel experience) you can easily pick up SIM cards at shopping kiosks almost anywhere, and the rates are really ...


14

It depends on what countries you are travelling to. If the country uses GSM, in most cases the best plan is to make sure you have an unlocked GSM phone, and purchase a pay-as-you-go SIM card in the country you are going to. If you Google for "International SIM" you will see that there are tons of websites selling pay-as-you-go SIMs, and in many countries, ...


14

AT&T has PayAsYouGo SIM cards, you can buy them in the real AT&T stores. You just come in and ask the clerk to sell you one. It costs $20 (as far as I remember). Then there's a $20/200MB (not sure about exact numbers) data plan for this card which is pretty expensive if you really plan to use the internet extensively. T-Mobile also has prepaid SIM ...


13

Well, turns out this is really easy - I just entered a store and asked for a monthly plan which includes unlimited data, and the clerk was happy to offer me a choice between a couple of available plans, without any requirement except a credit card (no need for zip code or credit check or American credit card / address). The store was T-Mobile, but I think ...


12

If she's there for a year, it might be worth getting a contract, as that may well be cheaper overall. As she already has the phone, she'd want a "SIM Only" deal, if she can get it. A carrier store on/near campus ought to be used to international students, so should be able to help if possible. (I've had a sales guy in a small AT&T shop look at me like I ...


12

First off, I would use Skype, Google Voice (through GMail outside the US) or any other VOIP-like provider. They offer a tariff of ~2c/min and ~30c/min (mobile) for calling to Italian numbers. Obviously if the other person has Skype, you only pay for the internet connection. Your only problem then would be to get an affordable prepaid mobile data plan unless ...


12

A possible option is a global sim card, like those from GoSim. They work in nearly every country. Another sneakier method, depending on what you need the data for and how fast it needs to be, is a 3G Kindle. It has free data to download books on Amazon's Whispernet in almost every country in the world, and has a basic experimental web browser on it. With ...


10

My own best way to avoid data roaming fees when travelling is simply NOT to bring a cell phone abroad. Making a phone call is easy from anywhere without a cell phone and internet connections are provided in many places in cybercafés. Moreover, this is one object that you won't get stolen if it stays at home.


9

In many of the big cities you will find department stores that are dedicated to selling electronics equipment. This is the place to buy your plan. The reason is that most of the booths are manned by young people and you are more likely to find someone who can speak English. You need to understand that although Chinese people are trying hard to learn English ...


9

I guess you might be in the UK based on the networks you listed? For within Europe, Vodafone are currently pretty good. Vodafone Passport means it's a single charge to answer/make a call, the rest is at the UK rate. If you're on a £40+/month plan, they'll give you 25mb/day/country of data for free, and 10 free texts a day When I go outside of Europe, I ...


9

While fairly slow to use, the Kindle 3G web browser works well enough for email and some browsing, and the 3G SIM is contract free and works throughout most of the World. Bar the cost of purchase it makes it free to use the internet for a lot of travelling.


8

Was in the same situation a while ago, and found it impossible to find a prepaid sim for my phone in the states. Short answer is: it's easier use open WiFi hotspots instead of purchasing a prepaid sim card. The long answer is that you can get really cheap phones for less than $30 on supermarkets, corner stores and petrol stations, but they all have a sim ...


8

Finally I got a 3 (http://three.co.uk) SIM for 1 pound and unlimited traffic data for 15 pounds. You can get a 10 pounds - 500Mb plan too. All of these things as a prepaid plan and working in less than a minute. You get a ticket with a code to set your SIM card credit and that's all. Take a look at their plans here.


8

Singapore has three mobile phone operators and given the small size of the country, their coverage is fairly similar. Their offerings aren't very differentiated for contract plans, but for pre-pay plans there are some differences. SingTel has a 'Super Surfer Pack' that offers 1 GB of data for S$7 valid for 7 days. StarHub offers a mobile data plan that ...


8

This is NZ we're talking about. It's still lagging with a smaller population in terms of technology up-take and bandwidth capacity. As such, currently, there are no unlimited data plans in NZ for mobile phones (Orcon has introduced them for broadband internet at home). Why? You can read the whole discussion about what might be required for this to happen ...


7

In Germany I recommend buying a pre-paid SIM from a provider called simyo because they allow you to tether (so do a number of other providers, but with simyo I'm 100% positive because I use their service on a regular basis). 39 euros buys you unlimited calling to all landlines and mobile networks within Germany (including text messages) plus unlimited ...


7

Answers to 1b: Depending where you go, you can use FON. The only requirement is that you share your internet connection at home through fon, and you have many wifi access points worldwide.


6

Pre paid cards data connection in Israel can be quite expensive (in my opinion at least). From what I've seen on Orange BigTalk's website (sadly available in Hebrew, Russian and Arabic languages only), data connection on pre paid SIM costs are: 1MB = 4 NIS. You can get those cards in Israel post offices, kiosks, and Orange service points that exists in ...


6

In Europe you still need a separate SIM for every country (unfortunately). In the uk it is really easy to buy a "pay as you go" sim for your phone or a pay as you go dongle for your laptop. If you don't have a 3G modem just buy one of these. Its easy to google some sites that offer comparison: http://www.google.co.uk/search?q=3g+pay+as+you+go+internet The ...


6

Almost always. Getting a SIM in European countries shouldn't be too hard, as there's usually an airport kiosk or something of the sort that sells SIM cards. If not, just pop over to your city's local mall or shopping street and there's bound to be a carrier store (Orange, Vodafone, T-Mobile, etc). The rates offered by the local SIMs is usually a tenth or ...


6

Meteor offer a 500MB allowance for €4.99 or a 1GB allowance for €9.99. See here for details.


6

I just got a vodafone.it prepaid SIM with unlimited (or maybe several GB of) data for less than 30€. I'm fairly certain that was the best data plan available for my travels in Italy. You can get it at a Vodafone store in Italy. The Vodafone network in Como/Garda/Verona is very good. I can confirm that data roaming between Germany, Austria, Switzerland, ...


6

After further research on my own I found an interesting option. The companies simyo and blau.de offer a prepaid roaming plan in Germany for the European Union. See for example here for simyo. You can buy a package for 20 Euros that covers 150 minutes calling 150 text messages 300 MB data valid 8 days You can also buy 50 MB (valid for 7 days) for 5 Euros. ...


6

Is it always the case that every single national border crossing means you need a new SIM card to avoid impractically high fees? Not always, there are some international service providers that charge no roaming fees - in Africa. I'm not aware of any such offers in Europe. Most of the questions I've seen about this are from before the recent EU ...


5

You can find a list of possible pay as you go plans here : http://paygsimwithdata.wikia.com/wiki/Spain .


5

I'd suggest you get a cheap GSM phone (assuming you're not lucky enough to have a GSM phone already), and then pick up a pre-pay (PAYG) sim card when you get to spain. This will also have the bonus of giving you a Spanish number for the duration of your trip, so people in Spain can call you for a sensible amount of money. If you only want data, you may ...


5

Truemove-H is the Best for you, with fastest and most coverage 850MHz 3G Network in nationwide and very cheap price plan. Best carrier coverage in Thailand is AIS but 3G is a few coverage in nationwide. so your mobile might be switch to EDGE when 3G not available.


5

China has three major networks (all of which the government has some stake in, I believe). China Unicom is the one you'll want to go after as they operate a GSM/3G network that's compatible with most international cell phones, as opposed to the others which mainly use CDMA (much like AT&T and T-Mobile vs. Verizon and Sprint in the US). As with most ...


5

Go for the latter: get an unlocked smartphone and a local data plan. By far the cheapest. Also, you could buy the phone in Thailand. That being more of a developing country, you'd be surprised how cheap (mostly Chinese, but not only) smartphones can be. You should easily be able to get a basic smartphone for under 100 USD. Even the low end Samsungs shouldn't ...


5

There is an important distinction to make between the UMTS/3G USB stick, which is the hardware that allows your computer to connect to a base station, and the contract you have with a mobile network provider to allow you to use their infrastructure, embodied by a SIM card that plugs into the USB stick. You need both, and they need to be compatible, which ...



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