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-4

But, as you're traveling through states in America and are pulled over for a traffic violation, cops can seize your assets (cash) for no other reason than you are carrying more than $2,500. America wants its citizens to be dependent on the banks so they make laws that disincentivize its citizens from carrying cash. America is turning into a Dictatorship. If ...


2

If you read the description of the rules on importing goods from outside the EU on the official website, you will notice that: To qualify for the tax/duty free allowances you also need to meet the following conditions: You must transport the goods yourself. The goods must be for your own use or as a gift. So duty-free allowances in the EU ...


6

In general the way it works is that you pay duty when you import something permanently to a country. If you are visiting a country, you generally do not pay import duty on something you are bringing in temporarily. That's why you don't have to pay duty on things you bring with you when you visit a country as a tourist. The issue is that they have to believe ...


3

There is no limit on buying duty free items, but there are limits on how much you can bring in duty free when you come home to the UK. As far as Hong Kong is concerned you can buy as much as you please. The limits on importing items into the UK will be per person, so you and your girlfriend each get an allotted amount and if you exceed that amount then ...


1

The best practice is not to keep sensitive and/or business critical data in a portable computer or device. The hard drive could fail anytime, the computer would be lost, broken, stolen. The best scenario is to host the data on any secure counter or server, which would be accessed either thought a VPN as @BurhanKhalid suggested or to be put somewhere in the ...


3

There are cases of customs and immigration demanding the passwords to phones or laptops, and then taking them out of sight of the passenger to use them and search them. Apparently by law you must provide these passwords when asked, and you may not follow the officers around to see what they do with your devices (such as putting USB sticks into them to copy ...


1

I am based in Bangalore, India and when I click on the link in your question, I see this: I guess if Amazon is allowed to ship it to India, then you are allowed to carry it with you. If you have any concerns, then you can order it on Amazon and request delivery in India. BTW, this item is widely available in India, at least in the larger cities. I have ...


3

https://www.gov.uk/duty-free-goods/arrivals-from-outside-the-eu You can bring in goods worth up to £390 duty-free.


3

Literally in answer to your question -- no, don't declare it or mention it. If you honest to God know it should not be declared (i.e.: you have, simply, owned it for years), then you have nothing to declare. If you have nothing to declare: that's the end of it. Note that you literally could not 'declare' it because --- it is not declarable!!!!! You own it, ...


1

Both Canada and US have a procedure for documenting your existing ownership of items that might be deemed new and dutiable if you leave the country with them and then bring them back home from a trip http://www.ezbordercrossing.com/the-inspection-experience/clearing-customs/jewelry-and-valuables/#.VDiIcGctCpk I found it most useful when I took a bunch of ...


4

Don't know if that's the answer you are looking for but another possibility is to approach the customs administration before leaving. There is often some procedure you can follow to facilitate re-entry, sometimes it's as simple as a form to fill in at the airport, without any fee. But you need to do it on the way out, not on the way back. Whatever you do, ...


0

In general, if it looks new, the customs guys may be very suspicious, but if it is used, probably not so much. If you are at all concerned, take the original receipt with you. This gives you a quick and easy solution. It's not perfect, by any means, but means customs have a way of checking if necessary.


9

To add the other answers (the one by Relaxed is spot-on - customs officers use their intuition), here comes some information about the legal situation, adapted to your case (Germany). Note that IANAL - so this is information is all only to the best of my knowledge. Legally, it is enough for the German Customs officers to suspect that something is imported ...


14

There are several tell-tale signs (condition, packaging, receipts, having several identical items, having things you would not typically need on a trip abroad) that might suggest an item has been bought during a trip. Beyond that, I guess customs officers follow (unpublished) guidelines or use their own judgment but they do in any case have a lot of ...


2

In some cases the custom officers can see if something is bought on your trip or brought by you from home, by looking at the serial number. Quite some electronic devises keep a log of serial numbers, country where it was sold, etc. However in most cases, it all is very subjective and probably dependent on personal decision by custom officers. The only ...


1

I don't think you will find a concise answer and even if there was one, Customs & Immigration Departments would not want it known publicly. In very generic terms ... They Observe. They are trained to read your body language, to interpret the way you answer, to go beyond the surface. They look at how you dress, what you have, where you were, how long ...


0

You don't have to pay anything unless if you overstayed. Depending on how long you overstated, they will let you know how much. We said we didn't have money then they told us we should pay on our next visit. We did our return but they never charged us.


9

I am not a lawyer, but from looking at the instructions to travelers by the Canadian Government, as well as from my personal experience, it seems that the following should work: You are allowed to bring items with you for your personal use when you enter Canada from the outside. This includes, for example, a laptop, or jewelry. Thus, you should not even ...


2

I checked this out for Canada, and the rules seem to be deliberately vague. As a visitor, you can bring certain goods into Canada for your own use as “personal baggage”. Personal baggage includes clothing, camping and sports equipment, cameras and personal computers. [...] You must declare all goods when you arrive at the first CBSA port of entry. [...] ...


1

According to the US Customs and Border Protection Prohibited and Restricted Items page, Food Products (Prepared) You may bring bakery items and certain cheeses into the United States. The APHIS Web site features a Travelers Tips section and Game and Hunting Trophies section that offers extensive information about bringing food and other products ...


10

First of all, what you intended to do and what you actually did, seem to go in two different directions. For all relevant legal definitions of "import", you did try to import the ring to the UK and had the ring not been found before you had opted for the green lane (and thereby making a legal statement that you have nothing to declare), you would most ...


8

You're generally not supposed to declare the stuff you already paid for and imported legally but you might be required to prove you did not buy them abroad, otherwise the regular import rules apply. The details will depend on the specific country and a few other things (e.g. whether you are a resident, currently moving to the country, etc.) but you are ...


5

You are only allowed to bring into a country x amount of good(s) (this varies per country). For example: The UK law for arrivals from non EU countries states: You can bring in other goods worth up to £390 without having to pay tax and/or duty. Bringing in items worth more than this amount is liable to tax, again e.g.: ...(if) you go over your ...


2

What surprised me about the other post is that while countries may levy duty on returning residents’ jewelry purchases, they generally allow visitors to bring in (as long as they take out) reasonable amounts of personal property. Not just jewelry, but also computers, videocameras, etc. In some cases a bond is required, or at the least serial number ...


9

I avoided this particular issue by having it made at the destination. That may not be an option for you, but it worked out for me. In any case, good luck! ...and she said yes! ...after initially thinking I was dragging her through an elaborate joke; me not realizing it was actually April Fool's Day. The lesson here is to consider more than just the ring ...


8

I actually did this over a fairly large journey (UK to NZ) and had absolutely no problems. It was in my carry on alongside my laptop - this was a mistake as everytime I took my laptop out I'd have a panic about the ring falling out. If it's inside your carry on it's unlikely to cause any issues.


28

USAToday actually wrote an article on this a while back. The key points were: Keep it in its box, safe and secure. (It may actually make it clearer on an xray) Avoid wrapping the box. Security may ask you to unwrap wrapped packages. Attach a small note - eg "Engagement ring inside, please be discreet". Put it in a clean sock or similar, as an extra ...


20

I would say worry only about hiding it from the recipient - keep it somewhere that person won't look - and if you happen to get a customs search, and they're clearly going to look in your bag and find it, one of two things will happen. If your beloved is with you, ask the customs officers to give you a moment, and then propose right then and there. After ...


13

Security is not an issue, a ring in a pocket of a backpack or briefcase would not raise an eyebrow from the security examiners. If you are going somewhere that absolutely requires you to declare everything in your possession to customs or somewhere that you think might do a customs search, you can always write a note to pass to the inspector while your ...


5

I arrived in the UK ... carrying a piece of jewelry So you intended to import an expensive, dutiable bauble into the UK. They discovered the jewelry while searching my bags You did not declare the bauble to HM Customs upon arrival. because the intended recipient is an EU citizen currently living in the UK And intend to give said bauble to a ...


1

If you are stepping out of the airport in Columbia then you might have a problem as you will be required to go through customs there. As far as taking the phones into Argentina it depends. Usually you are only allowed ONE device per device class(i.e. cellphone, tablet, camera, laptop) per person. So legally if you bring more than that in you will either ...


1

Its a risky proposition. Depending on which Airport you are landing in, customs can scan your bag before exiting the airport and any electronics inside will be visible to them. E.g. in Mumbai, they actually scan ALL check-in bags BEFORE they reach the baggage belt and if its suspicious they mark a big "X" on with with white chalk. Thats a the flag for the ...


2

When you come back into the country where you live (as a permanent resident or citizen), they have to let you in - eventually. But they may want to ask you a few things first, for a variety of reasons: they want to be sure you're really you, not someone you met in Pakistan and handed your passport to (or someone who robbed or tricked you), as a way to ...


2

If you are challenged at a CTA port (which is unlikely), they will scan it and if nothing flags up, you can proceed. You might get some stick about upgrading to the newer ID's, but that's reasonable. Keep your DVLA reference number handy. If you are an ROI citizen you are covered on UK side by the Ireland Act 1949 ...


2

This is common if you are visiting not only from Pakistan but other countries as well. You are in your 20s this happened also to a friend's father who was a retired UN officer (of Pakistani origin) residing in the US for the past 40+ years. So, take heart that its not only you. As Pakistan is a country that people visit to transit into Afghanistan and ...


2

It's the job of customs and immigration to establish your purpose for visit, and whether you're doing what you say you're doing. If they have any doubts, questions or are merely curious, they can and will as part of their job, ask you questions. Naturally this should be only about your plans in the country - if they start asking personal, potentially ...


0

As far as I am aware if you have a Uk warrant of arrest, it doesnt also mean that you have an EUW, EUW are only issued if the fellon is suspected to be in the EU (proof to the judge must be shown or good cause to beleive) and even then it has to be a serious crime as it involves alot of paper work, some countries like spain ive been told generaly dont care ...


3

You only have to do this if you have overstayed your visa and there are penalties levied. Otherwise there is not such tax on departure.


3

On his previous entries when he overstayed, did he receive an I-94 (paper or electronic) upon entry? Canadian visitors are usually not given I-94s. One generally only starts accruing "unlawful presence" after staying beyond the date on the I-94. If he did not get an I-94 (as is usual for Canadian visitors), then he does not automatically accrue "unlawful ...


3

Yes, I have done this twice for the same reason (but with an Israeli passport). Check into the flight with your SA passport There is no passport control on the way out of the US Enter Brazil on your SA passport Check into the return flight showing your US passport Exit Brazil on your SA passport Enter the US on your US passport Sometimes the airline will ...


0

The penalty for an overstay of six months to a year is a ban on entry for 3 years. The penalty for more than a year is a ban on entry for 10 years. That's why it's important to be precise about the time of overstay. I don't know how a second offence would be viewed. You can apply for a waiver of this period, but with two offences I wouldn't hold out much ...



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