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34

I'd ask if she had any blank cheques (checks) with her. A common trick is to remove a cheque or two from the middle of a book so it isn't immediately noticed. With a perfect sample of her signature, she could be set up to lose thousands of dollars from her chequing account. This was no accident. On the positive side, the motives are more likely those of ...


15

Check out Read Your Own DHS Travel Dossier (archive.org). The *.doc files don't work anymore but the *.txt files do. It's basically a template letter requesting the information they have on you, pursuant to the Privacy Act. Check out Criminal History Summary Checks on fbi.gov as well. That's FBI and not DHS / TSA, but it might give you some insight ...


12

The passport has been SIGNIFICANTLY damaged. Normal wear and tear is generally acceptable, but missing pages or vital data or stamps missing - that's considered significant, and you'll need to get it replaced. As a source, from the official FAQ page of the US Department of State and Travel: If your passport has been significantly damaged, especially the ...


12

As her passport has been "modified" (or damaged) it is no longer valid, and thus needs to be replaced if she is traveling internationally again. Many countries will not grant you entry if a page has been removed as they believe it may be an attempt to hide previous stamps. Further, a US passport is not valid if it is not signed, so as the signature page ...


7

The Schengen agreement is entirely unrelated to customs and goods, it's only about the movement of people. The UK isn't in the Schengen area and maintains its own visa policy but as a full member of the EU, it's part of the common market, which means you can import any quantity of alcoholic beverages from other EU countries (for personal use). Conversely, ...


7

The Antarctic Peninsula is a part of the sector of Antarctica claimed by Argentina. If you are taking a ship that goes only there (and not to the Falkland Islands, for example), you are technically not leaving Argentina at all. I went to the Antarctic Peninsula from Ushuaia last November. The crew took my passport before I boarded the ship, and returned it ...


6

It might be very difficult to get off one of those lists though. There's a very recent court ruling, regarding a case where someone was placed on a nofly list by accident and wanted to get off that list, which was way more complicated then it sounds. The court file may hold some leads for you. Also see this news article discussing up the problems.


6

First, your baggage will be checked through, and if you miss the connection, Lufthansa will put you on a later flight at no extra cost. Since you arrive early and there are many flights between Munich and Paris, it will probably be only an hour or two later. You will have to go through immigration and possibly security, but at 6 AM there probably won't be ...


6

Looks like you have been victim of fraud/identity theft. You should contact your government immediately. Although not all of the passport is gone, you might want to look at instructions for people who have had their whole passport stolen to get an idea of who to contact. If you've lost a document and don't know where it is, you cannot be sure that it has ...


6

If you really would rather be safe than sorry, you should follow the advice on the page you linked to, as it is advice I've followed in the past: A valid prescription or doctors note is required on all medication entering the U.S. Now practically we all know that's not really the case. Bringing in paracetamol/tylenol, or Imodium, or asthma medicines, etc, ...


5

You may use the transit facility of Swiss Customs. This is probably the most easiest way to transit with wine without problems. Alcoholic beverages that exceed the allowances and are destined for transit through Switzerland must be declared upon entry (see also Alcoholic beverages). The same applies for tobacco goods (see also Tobacco goods). A ...


4

You can make a request for entry/exit records (出入国記録) from the Japanese Ministry of Justice, but for foreigners records are only available from November 1st 1970 onwards. The process looks bureaucratic in the extreme (details here, Japanese only) and you'll almost certainly need to engage someone in Japan to help you, since the application forms are all ...


4

I'd go with what LaurentG has written. Declare it, pay the deposit (by credit card! Anything else will result in a for you completely useless CHF refund with according fees if you change it to USD) and get refunded upon leaving. There are flights departing from either secor, the French and the Swiss. Therefore, depending on where your gate lies, you might ...


4

I've crossed the border hundreds of times (if not thousands), so they can basically ask you anything. There's no reason to be nervous about the questions, unless you have something to hide. If that's the case, then do not attempt to enter the US lying otherwise you will be in a world of trouble. I'm a US Citizen (naturalized) so my English is a bit ...


3

When talking to a customs or immigration officer, the most important thing to do is tell the truth. This includes "I don't know" if that is the answer you have. The second most important thing to do is to show that you have planned and prepared, so that you trot out "I don't know" as little as possible. The questions start like this: who are you? what is ...


2

Yours spider is not listed by CITES, so it is not forbidden to bring your pet to one off the member states if you comply with the local import rules. It seems that your friend would need to apply for an import permit: For species not listed, the requirements are not known. However, exporters wanting to ship livestock or germplasm whose requirements are ...


2

From the fact the you do not identify the country of the passport (and perhaps the fact that you don't travel often :)), I will assume here that the passport in question is a U.S. passport. The other answers contains some useful and some useless information. I hope that the following is entirely useful AND may be urgent: So far, only the U.S. ...


2

If the booking system offered the connection, it is doable. Also, if I remember correctly, LH is using the same terminal for all their flights, so you would not have to change terminal. The connection is tight, and there are chances that you won't make it. You will then be automatically booked on the next available flight. If the baggage makes it but you ...


1

Timatic (the visa system used by most airlines) does not mention any requirements to show details of accommodation. Many countries will ask for details of accommodation on entry, generally as one of their multiple check to confirm you are a legitimate tourist, and that you will be staying in approved accommodation. In your case, you will be able to show ...


1

From Visa Information For Foreigners: Cameroon: [...removed info for diplomatic passport holders...] Ordinary passport holders are required to have visa to enter Turkey. Ordinary passport holders with a valid Schengen or OECD member's visa or residence permit may get their one month period single entry e-Visas via the website www.evisa.gov.tr. ...


1

You will arrive and depart in Terminal 2 which was specifically designed for short transfer times down to 30 min. There are even extra cars which take you directly from plane to plane (via security) if needed, see: http://www.munich-airport.de/en/consumer/aufenthalt_trans/airportstop/minconntime/hcc/index.jsp Most likely you will arrive in Terminal 2, ...


1

You'll manage it, otherwise Lufthansa wouldn't have offered the connection. Since yours is a long-flight from Mumbai to Munich, there is a chance that you come earlier, and in reality you have 1 h. The only caveat is that from my personal experience, your checked-in luggage possibly won't manage to catch the next plane. Missing baggage after connected ...



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