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European Strategy As others have rightfully pointed out: there is no unique European greeting custom. Consequently there is no universally acknowledged strategy to avoid awkward situations. I however agree with my fellow travellers here: shake hands with strangers and with people to whom you are not close. Physical contact is strongly linked to intimacy ...


2

As an American, I have never managed to figure this out. To take some examples from the other answers, I've heard people say things like "You should visit us in DC some time" or "I'll owe you a beer" and later found out in some cases that it meant nothing, whereas in other cases they were completely serious. So the only reasonable answer I can offer is that ...


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There are several factors that come into play here. Some cultures have a significant amount of politeness as a social lubricant. Even when it doesn't mean you should, it is still said. A classic example of this is Japan's politeness (though this is simplifying a very large concept). There is an entire school of sociology called politeness theory. ...


18

To me, the key is the specificity of the invitation. The vaguest, of course, say "some time" - this is a bright light signalling that it is not a real invitation. "We should do lunch some time" means absolutely nothing at all. Similarly claims to "owe you" a beer or a coffee do not constitute an offer to deliver that item, nor an invitation to go, now or in ...


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In my experience, if an American says "you should visit me in DC", they mean it. I'm an American myself, born and raised, and this has been my experience for over thirty years. However, I'm from rural New York, and now I live in rural California. In both of these areas, invitations like this are taken to be real. Considering how many upvotes the opposing ...


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There is an essay which explains the difference between "polite" and "direct" cultures. First of all: For members of the Anglosphere like Americans, Britons and Canadians the Germans are using the term "Angelsachsen" (Anglo-Saxons) which is slightly different from the meaning in English, it especially has a more humorous connotation like "Teuton" for ...


191

In general, a genuine invitation is concrete, containing information that helps to make it happen. "Would you like to get lunch tomorrow?" is an invitation, and could be followed up with "Yes, how about [restaurant]?" or "Yes, do you have a place in mind?" to accept. If you responded instead with "No, but we should meet some other time," that could be a ...


2

The answer is yes, and here are my sources: Night Markets in Taiwan on Wikipedia: Carnival-style games are typically available to play for the price of a few coins. The night market in Tamsui is especially well known for featuring traditional carnival games such as balloon shooting, net fish, shooting marbles, and an assortment of mini games that ...



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