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11

Company chiefs sent out a memo informing female staff they would be required "to wear trousers during the flight with a loose fitting jacket and a scarf covering their hair on leaving the plane", Mr Pillet said. First off, nobody is obliged to wear any kind of hijab unless they leave the plane: Company chiefs sent out a memo informing female ...


28

I'll try to address this question impartially despite my strong feelings against Mandatory Hijaab for women (I'm a male, born and raised in Iran who lives in United States now) I'll define the terms first and then will mention what is minimally required by the law. Hijaab (means veil in Arabic) is a religious term. It's definition varies across cultures, ...


6

Women in public in Iran are legally required to cover up their hair, to wear long sleeves and long pants. How they achieve this is up to them. So, particularly in urban areas, many women only will wear a scarf to cover their hair, while in often more rural areas, you'll more likely see a chador. Any other clothing for this, like a niqab or burqa, is very ...


7

Legally, they have to wear Hijab, but hijab comes in many different styles, they do not approve of all styles, at least not the religious police. The favorite style for the religious police is called the chādor, which was somehow enforced by the religious police after the revolution in 1979. The Chador looks like the Niqab for the foreigners, but it's ...


18

I visited last year. My pure understanding of the law there obviously isn't perfect as an outsider, but the following of the 'law' seemed very rough, women would wear a covering, but sometimes only over the bob of a pony-tail, for example. However, if in a place of business, eg a hotel or restaurant, you'd regularly see proprietors or staff quickly address ...



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