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1

I think the consumables in the rooms are well covered in the other answers. The thing I miss in most of them is the food at breakfast (and maybe other buffets.) In Norway there are extensive breakfast buffets in hostels, when I was there most of those had a notice that you could eat as much as you liked but were not allowed to take food out of the room. ...


-1

You can take away daily consumables, which you have used and which cannot be used again or given to others like soap, shampoos, shaving kit, sponges etc. and you can also take pens, magazines and note pads. I do suggest to take away towels if it's necessary during your travel, because some of the hotels consider it as scrap. They won't mind taking that with ...


4

I found the above answers to be unclear. So: 1) You can and should take as many pairs of the cheap slippers as you can grab (the single-use ones with a logo, wrapped in plastic). These are really handy and cool! 2) You can and should (if for some reason you want to) take all the toiletries: that is to say the small bottles of shampoo, etc., and similarly ...


3

Tourists are absolutely welcome in Munich. The city is doing a lot to get tourists from all over the world to visit (and to bring money with them). Sales people from my company (close to Munich) bring customers from all over to the Oktoberfest every year and they love it.


14

Young Indian traveller's perspective here - every year many students (~700 - 1000+) from India's premier graduate and undergraduate colleges go on European student exchange semesters or internships around this time of year. I would say close to 60% of those students visit Oktoberfest, and I have seen Facebook feeds overflowing with Oktoberfest pics. Apart ...


10

To add to the other good answers: I am Bavarian, and in 2007 I attended the Esala Perahera in Kandy. It will be a similar experience when you visit the Oktoberfest. Some people might gaze at you out of curiosity for not looking like the majority. But over all, it is a celebration, and people are there for a good time (be it rooted in religion or not). This ...


7

Of course you're welcome. You don't even need to drink either. It's all pretty mellow and I've never heard of or seen any trouble. Just be aware of the cultural difference that some Germans, even when being what for them is considered relaxed and friendly, are still quite reserved. Some tents seem to be more corporate networking or hardcore drinking in ...


30

Munich local here. We welcome everyone at Oktoberfest, doesn't matter where you're from or how you look. The only things you really have to be careful about is getting excessively drunk (the beer is strong and plentiful), and getting into drunk arguments (which can get nasty when everyone has large, heavy glass steins in reach).


16

The Oktoberfest is a strongly German cultural event. It is for this reason that you are likely to be welcome there (rather than otherwise). The Germans are looking to "spread the word" (regarding their culture) to people from other parts of the world. In this context, the fact that you are obviously "different" is a positive rather than a negative. Just go ...


58

Oktoberfest is a major international tourist festival in a modern, progressive country. No one will question your attendance, no matter how you look. The only reason it would be awkward is if you told everyone that you didn't like German beer! [The only suggestion of racism I could find was where an Asian customer was asked to move from a table at ...


1

You might want to checkout the Wedding Ceremony Sequence on this link and it will give you an idea or an overview on how a traditional Catholic wedding ceremony is done in the Philippines. For dress code, since you are already in the Philippines, try wearing their national dress for males which they call, the Barong Tagalog.



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