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63

Oktoberfest is a major international tourist festival in a modern, progressive country. No one will question your attendance, no matter how you look. The only reason it would be awkward is if you told everyone that you didn't like German beer! [The only suggestion of racism I could find was where an Asian customer was asked to move from a table at ...


55

Taking Complimentaries Home I would say that it all boils down to how cheap you want to look, in the eyes of the hotel management. If you don't care, and probably you shouldn't, then there are some things you can take with you upon check-out. Taking Consumables As a general rule I would say: you can take anything that is single-serving. For the purpose ...


50

Aniket basically said the right thing but let me clarify a few things. There are many regions/groups of people in India but for myself the Bengali example is the best. It is very common for Bengalis to have two names, one of which (bhalo naam) is the legal name used on all official documents. The other (dak naam) is a colloquial name used by family and ...


47

To deal with your various questions: Yes you can bring your car into Amish country. While the area is home to many Amish families it is not run along Amish lines. There are roads and shops and all the usual things you would find. If you have actual business on an Amish farm then they are OK with you driving onto it, just as you would visiting any other ...


38

Here's an excerpt from Wikitravel: Although many visitors, especially Americans, may feel apprehensive about visiting Hiroshima, it is a friendly, welcoming city, with as much interest in Western culture as anywhere else in Japan. Tourists are welcomed, and exhibits related to the atomic bomb are not concerned with blame or accusations. Bear in mind, ...


33

TL;DR: It's complicated, but in practice, yes, building snowmen is still allowed for everybody. A fatwa is not a law, it's a ruling by an Islamic scholar that's technically only binding on the person who issued it, not all Muslims in Saudi Arabia, much less all people there. This particular fatwa does not appear to originate from the Permanent Committee, ...


30

Let me first state that I've lived in Dubai for a solid 19 years (years 0 to 19). In these 19 years, I have done almost everything there is to do in Dubai and been almost every place there is to go (including going to night clubs even though I was under age). At the outset, let me clarify this: I'd wish to visit Dubai with my girlfriend, but after ...


30

What people usually do is putting on their boxers/underwear in the shower cubicle then come out and put on the rest. Some people do what Burhan described in the other answer as well.


29

Munich local here. We welcome everyone at Oktoberfest, doesn't matter where you're from or how you look. The only things you really have to be careful about is getting excessively drunk (the beer is strong and plentiful), and getting into drunk arguments (which can get nasty when everyone has large, heavy glass steins in reach).


28

I'll try to address this question impartially despite my strong feelings against Mandatory Hijaab for women (I'm a male, born and raised in Iran who lives in United States now) I'll define the terms first and then will mention what is minimally required by the law. Hijaab (means veil in Arabic) is a religious term. It's definition varies across cultures, ...


26

I stayed a long time in rural Aceh, so here are my tips: First of all, do not think of Indonesians as very religious. They are usually traditionalist (some may say conformist). This is different. Cover yourself You should both wear pants below the knees and shirt with sleeves, no cleavage, no belly button displayed. Nobody will throw rocks at you if you ...


23

As Jonathan's answer mentions, pretty much all police officers open carry firearms in the U.S. (pistols on their belt.) Other than that, however, seeing people visibly carry their firearms is very rare in the U.S. (unless you're at a gun range or some such thing.) I live in one of the most gun-friendly parts of the U.S. and I almost never see a firearm ...


21

Various online sources (Lonely Planet, Tripadvisor, USA Today, Dubai FAQ) seem to agree that as long as you don't start making out in public and telling people that you're not married, or attract the attention of the police in other ways, you'll be breaking the law but are very unlikely to get into trouble. People in general, and hotel staff especially ...


21

Wrap a towel around your waist (or use a dressing gown/shower gown and face the locker) and then change your trunks/shorts.


19

It is perfectly fine. The call to prayer is frequently televised so there is nothing wrong with recording it and posting it on youtube. It is done often. However, do not go to the mosque during prayer and start recording there. Its not that its not allowed, its just that you'll have to have prior permission and you may be a distraction to the congregation.


18

Hitchwiki has: Hitchhiking is done in Iran by waving one's arm at an oncoming car, or by dribbling one of your hands. I have not seen this myself (experience only of Tehran) because taxis seemed virtually free there anyway but I think I recognise the "dribbling hand" gesture as something that looks to me like an accelerated version of a 'slow down' ...


18

Every single police offer in the US carries a visible firearm as a part of their uniform. Therefore it is extremely likely that you will see multiple handguns during your visit as most urban areas are regularly patrolled by policemen.


18

I visited last year. My pure understanding of the law there obviously isn't perfect as an outsider, but the following of the 'law' seemed very rough, women would wear a covering, but sometimes only over the bob of a pony-tail, for example. However, if in a place of business, eg a hotel or restaurant, you'd regularly see proprietors or staff quickly address ...


17

It's perfectly fine. I've been to both Hiroshima and Nagasaki in my (Japanese) high school trip including multiple sessions with hibakushas. There is really no animosity in general. The emphasis of these museums and parks are solely on how horrible nuclear attacks and war is, and how we need to achieve world peace and eliminate all wars. I think most ...


17

I actually listened to a podcast on the Amish a couple of weeks ago, based on this article on Howstuffworks. I'd recommend it for some solid background. They're not idiots - they do have education, and they know fully what a camera is, but choose not to use them. They generally would prefer you not to take photos - as DJClayworth said, imagine tourists ...


17

A fatwa is not a legal opinion, it is a religious opinion and it only sometimes has to do with the law. This distinction is important if the country's legal system follows the Sharia, and typically in those cases, the rulings are done by a central committee (as in Saudi Arabia) and not just any goof with mouth. In Saudi, there have been some insane ...


17

The Oktoberfest is a strongly German cultural event. It is for this reason that you are likely to be welcome there (rather than otherwise). The Germans are looking to "spread the word" (regarding their culture) to people from other parts of the world. In this context, the fact that you are obviously "different" is a positive rather than a negative. Just go ...


16

Absolutely not an issue. Just to give a first-hand perspective (though the other 2 answers both excellently cover the 'why not'), I visited the Nagasaki Atomic Bomb Museum and the Peace Park a few years back, and at no point did I feel any ill-will or awkwardness. As with any similar place as long as you are respectful you are welcome - the staff were as ...


16

A quick scan of Wikivoyage's guide to Hiroshima sights indicate that memorials and museums to the attack have English-language information. If they didn't intend non-Japanese to visit the place, they wouldn't have such information. I seriously doubt that they'd regard the USA differently from other non-Japanese countries in this context, even though the USA ...


16

I've found regardless of destination, that people are far less offended by cultural faux pas-ses then by behavior that would be rude anywhere. In India, I've accidentally paid with my left hand, and I've seen the person in return get a little uncomfortable, and accept the money with his right. What I did, however, is just apologize and ask, at which point he ...


16

Your good name is basically your first name. It's a throwback from our British colonial days... where a gentleman would ask another who is not of acquaintance and would like to be friendly - "May I ask your good name, sir?" or something on those terms. And if they ask for your full name - well you tell your full name. In India, it's preferable to use ...


15

Young Indian traveller's perspective here - every year many students (~700 - 1000+) from India's premier graduate and undergraduate colleges go on European student exchange semesters or internships around this time of year. I would say close to 60% of those students visit Oktoberfest, and I have seen Facebook feeds overflowing with Oktoberfest pics. Apart ...


13

You're not dealing with idiots or religious fanatics. Them not participating in modern conveniences doesn't mean that they don't know what those are. There are sites like: Lancaster PA PA Dutch Country and various reviews and posts on Trip Advisor that will help you to plan your trip. And just for kicks Amish are not a uniform group, so there are ...


13

Things like towels, bathrobes and slippers are not there to be taken, they are to be left behind. Small toiletries like soap, shampoo, lotions, toothbrush are yours to keep if you so desire. And while hotels assume a single guest will use only one set, they won't chase you down if you take the second set.


12

Having grown up in a similar conservative Anabaptist community and now living near a large Amish community, here is my $0.02. Rental car--absolutely! As other answers point out, members of Amish communities own their homes/farms but not the roads. Of course, be aware of the alternative transportation modes you will see, and slow down for buggies, scooters, ...



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