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25

Google reverse image search locates the original of this picture. It is the Fausto Theatre in Havana. The ants were a temporary exhibit.


18

That is the Teatro Fausto, on the corner of Prado and Colon, in Havana Cuba. The "ants" you see in the photo were an artist's exhibit in 2012 for the Havana Biennial. They are no longer on the building.


14

Coaches in Cuba - Astro and Viazul There are two main coach companies providing island-wide transport in Cuba: AstroBus and Viazul. Astro caters mostly to Cuban residents and intrepid travellers. Most of the seats are available for purchase only to residents with a valid ID, and just a few are available for foreigners albeit at higher rates. Overall its ...


11

A little bit of history: (from the top of my head, there is very little to find about this on the web I think, even in Spanish): At some point during the Cuban Revolution and before I was born, being in possesion of any foreing currencies in Cuba became illegal (unless you had a special permit from the government). Many Cubans spent time in jail for this ...


11

You've got it more or less backwards. The restrictions are essentially aimed at controlling the rate at which hard currency (i.e. USD / EUR) leaves the country, so goods which are imported are only available with CUC. Therefore there is high demand among Cubans for CUC. As a rule of thumb, if you manage to get sufficiently off the beaten track that people ...


9

It's the Fausto Theater, as identified on this photo blog. More information on the history of the theatre found on cinematreasures.org. Located in the Habana Vieja (old town) district of Havana, on the Prado at the corner of Esquina Colon in the Jaruco neighborhood. The Cine-Teatro Fausto was built in 1938 and designed in an Art Deco style, by ...


8

According to the US Department of State, Tourist travel to Cuba is prohibited under U.S. law for U.S. citizens and others under U.S. jurisdiction. Legally traveling to Cuba as a US Citizen requires a reason specified under one of several types of licenses to do so. General & Specific Licenses for Travel: The U.S. Department of the Treasury’s ...


8

Like any medical specialists, in any country, advance booking is likely a necessity. You could walk in but if they're busy or on leave, you wouldn't be able to see anyone. So I'd recommend contacting a few in advance. This is relatively easy to do online: The Frank Pais Orthopedic Hospital in Havana (I saw this when I went through the city in July) has ...


6

I stayed in Cuba last summer. Accidentally, I found a reliable, safe and at the same time cheap casas particulares network. I wrote about it in my Spanish blog (sorry for the SPAM, but I thing it could be interesting to read it in Spanish or using a translator). To sum up: The 'head' of the network is in the Hamel Hostel (La Habana). It will cost 5 USD per ...


6

I ask myself after travelling to Cuba. All places I visited were free of charge, including Varadero and other major spots like Guardalavaca. Before I visit Cuba I read that you have to pay for access to the beaches, but this information is outdated or false: you don't have to pay for access anywhere. Interesting snorkeling sites I visited include: Coral ...


6

Strictly speaking travelling to Cuba isn't illegal. The US doesn't have exit controls, so it's citizens are allowed to travel wherever in the world they want. What the US does have is a very strict embargo with Cuba. Effectively this means in order to travel to Cuba a US citizen or resident needs a licence to spend money there. These licences, which ...


5

There is a small musical instruments store in Havana, in a place called "El Boulevard de San Rafael", it's a pedestrian street and the store is about 300 meters from Hotel Inglaterra. If you prefer, you could also post an add on the website revolico.com before traveling there (this is similar to kijiji, craigslist etc, very popular in Cuba) saying "busco ...


5

Well, yes it sounds weird because it is weird. The 50 CUC on "Kometa" is round trip (see here) that includes a transfer from bus station to Port as far as I can tell but as mentioned on the page: "expect a lousy ride". On the bus that is. The flights are available too. Served by Cubana for $82/pp round trip. So it's up to you what you would like to do. ...


5

The official place to exchange currencies is CADECA, this entity purchases and sell certain currencies according to Cuban Central Bank Rates. These rates are updated daily. You can find CADECAs in the airport, and in major cities. Exchange rates should be the same country wide. Note that you will be exchanging your GBP for CUC and not for Cuban Peso, ...


4

If you look through Delta's SkyMiles partner rules for Aeromexico, they state that flights to/from Havana do not earn miles. http://www.delta.com/content/www/en_US/skymiles/earn-miles/earn-miles-with-partners/airlines/aeromexico.html No idea why, but likely due to US trade restrictions against Cuba.


4

As you have apparently found, due to the fact that the trade embargo with Cuba remains, you can't book on any US websites, nor any US based websites. That means not only the obvious "US version of Foo.com", but also "any other country like the UK's version of US-based Foo.com". (Insert many major hotel booking websites here). If you try, you either can't ...


3

This doesn't exist. Per Wikivoyage Internet cafes can be found at ETESCA (the state telephone company) offices, in Hotel Habana Libre, Hotel Inglatera (cheapest but slowest), Hotel Nacional and at the Capitolio. The Wikipedia article on ETECSA: The cost of Internet access is CUC$4.50 per hour (or CUC$0.60 for domestic intranet access and CUC$1.50 ...


3

Just to provide the answer by @user31253 some flavor since it's a direct quote: From official website of one of the Ferry Companies CubaKat Experience Passenger Ferry Service to Cuba from Florida In early May 2015, the U.S. government, through the Department of Treasury, began issuing licenses to American ferry operators to provide service to Cuba. ...


3

I've only ever done all-inclusive in Cuba, where the best way to exchange money is at the resort - more because it's the only reasonably simple way to do it than because you get the best rates. Cuba likes to keep control of the exchange process. I doubt that exchanging money at the airport is substantially worse than exchanging it at a hotel. Cubans really ...


3

(...)talk about a tax of 3 CUC per day(...) Actually it's not a tax, it's a regular service fee. The information you are requesting can be found on the company website (in Spanish): Etecsa - Mobile Phone Services- Contract and Activation The service charge is 3 CUC (+- 3 USD) per day The minimal duration of a contract is 3 days You need to pay all the ...


3

It's highly recommended you bring gear, not only for yourself, but to leave behind for the local Cubans. CubaClimbing.com, PlanetMountain and others all pretty much say the following: To sustain the local climbers, please pack extra climbing gear and leave it all behind. The Cubans need climbing equipment, as it's impossible to get it locally. The ...


3

Since the restrictions from the US embargo to Cuba are being relaxed slowly, AirBnB has recently started to expands its services to Cuba. I think you will not find anything more reliable than that at this moment. I have personally used estanciahabana.com and revolico.com in the past, but I have relatives in Cuba who visit the place and meet the owner in ...


2

Although you would need to secure a visa through the Cuban consulate, you might also wish to check with the US Consulate. US citizens may not go as tourists but may visit, without penalty, for the following reasons: family visits; official government business; journalism; professional research and meetings; educational activities; religious activities; ...


2

The hospital Cira García in Havana is specialized in offering medical services to foreigners in Cuba. You can contact them by phone or email. Note that phone calls to Cuba are usually very expensive.


2

According to Timatic you don't need a visa if you have a confirmed ticket and leave within 72 hours: TWOV (Transit Without Visa): Visa required, except for Holders of confirmed onward tickets However, according to a Lonely Planet discussion on the same subject: According to this website you don't need a visa to Cuba when transit is under 72 ...


2

india to Cuba, Best route ans cheapest will be from Delhi to Moscow and then Moscow to Havana by Aeroflot Airline.



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