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90

I live in a very corrupt country - Ukraine. Let me give you some advice. First, try to avoid looking like stranger. Try to look like the locals. That is often difficult, I know. It's the only advice about how to avoid corrupt police. They often search for strangers just to get some money from them, because strangers are easy meat. All the other advice is ...


38

First, in problematic places I would try to avoid interacting with the police as much as possible. Another strategy is patience. Usually, corrupt police are just trying to make quick money off an easy victim. Tourists are an obvious target because they tend to have more money and are more likely to be unfamiliar with the local language and customs. If you ...


31

Follow the steps: Remain calm. Ask for identification before going anywhere with them or giving them anything. Don't sign anything without a lawyer present. If they start accusing you of anything, state that you require they then contact your embassy to help you with a lawyer. Generally if they're scamming, they don't want documentation or third parties ...


18

To avoid getting harassed? Avoid the police in places where they have a very bad reputation, like Mexico City. In my experience at least in Mexico City the corrupt ones always look evil. The ones that look nice actually are nice. Look in their eyes and you might be able to see it even from a distance. (I'm really not kidding) When you can't avoid the ...


12

The key tactic no one else mentioned - relax and do your best to not look like a foreigner. I can't explain it, but whenever I notice a strange well dressed person that person turns out to be a foreigner - he has some concentrated+excited look and behaves largely different from local people. Again, I can't explain it in full - foreigners while being ...


11

Oh, I found a good suggestion in the Barcelona tourist guide "I'd like to warn your users about an all too common scam which is unfortunately being used on the streets of Barcelona. This happened to me on 18 May, and I think you'll be doing your users a great favour by alerting them to this attempt to steal goods and possessions. It works like this: A ...


11

You can stay without registration for up to 3 months after you arrive. But you need to have a document that confirms that you are leaving (airplane or train ticket will work). If you want to stay longer, you'll need to get a temporary registration in the police. That may be painful, because this registration is bound to a place where you live and should be ...


10

A key here is "networking," that is, "playing the influence game." Policemen respect "authority." They may pick on you if you appear to have no "authority," particularly if you're "young" (in your teens or twenties). Thus, it helps to know people that they would respect. Or at least give them the impression that you do (this happens more easily if you look ...


8

There are no international rules that forbid that. There are numerous stories on the Internet about people whose driver's licenses were conficsated in EU countries. Here is an official guide for British drivers driving abroad. It says: If you break French driving laws you can also have your UK driving licence confiscated by French Police. Similarly, ...


8

There is no need to hand over money to any officials to bribe them. There are now anti-corruption units all over the country that will arrest on sight for such activity. Officials now fear taking bribes and fear foreigners in particular because they know they can go a step further to expose them. Personally i do not support corruption and it I have seen how ...


6

I've been told to register if you're in a place for 7 days or more. Simply put, hostels should be able to do this for you, it takes a day, and is very simple. Just ask them when you get there. Nobody checked mine, however upon exit, but when I return to Russia I'll continue to register - it's one thing you don't want to get caught short on.


5

In Romania the police is also corrupt but fortunately the bribe is working VERY well especially with old generation of cops. The policeman in Romania will not take you to the police station for minor stuff because it involves way too much paper work. Just enter into discussion with them, smile and show your intention to pay a small bribe by holding your ...


4

Others have already provided correct answers but it might be useful to note that the very way you framed the question is at odds with the way international law works. The relevant law in a such a situation is first and foremost the local law. Beyond some limited things like the right to request that your consulate be informed of your situation when arrested, ...


3

In addition to tips on right behaviour, I would recommend using some digital resources to get your way out of trouble. Dropbox is great for saving copies of your ticket/IDs/docs for emergency purposes. Bribespot, an app that was already mentioned by Mark Mayo, is an app that allows you to report corruption and browse bribe stories submitted by other people ...


2

My strategy is to not avoid getting shaken down by corrupt officials. I don't think the average corrupt cop enjoys being a corrupt cop; he finds it humiliated and demoralizing. On the other hand, he has to eat. So, treat it as an ordinary business transaction or government fee. Inquire about the price, pay up cheerfully, and thank him for his ...


2

I have to agree that behaviour and dress go a long way. If you can't blend in as a local because of your cultural features at least try and look like you live there. Move with confidence, don't stand around looking lost with a map in your hand, dress like locals or 'non-touristy'. For example, it is my second time in Kathmandu and I don't walk around in ...


1

Passports and drivers licenses are governmental documents of which you are the holder. Since the Mexican police are the official representatives of the authorities in Mexico your drivers license actually is their property, so legally they have all rights to take your license. When they confiscate your license they say that you are not fit to continue ...


1

My only experience renting a car in Fiji worked out fine. We drove from Nadi down to Sigatoka and back. This was prior to the 2006 coup but after the 2000 coup. Things will have changed since then, but the Fijian people are very friendly to outsiders and I would not have any concerns renting a car.


1

Just to add to the examples of it's happening, there's one case that aired on TV: The TV show, The Amazing Race had the teams in IIRC New Zeland and one was driving the speed limit in mph when the signs were in kph. That was far enough over the limit that the cop took his license on the spot. They were only allowed to continue with the teammate doing the ...


1

IANAL, but when you're on Mexican soil, you're legally subject to their authority. Therefore, they can legally confiscate your driver's license, and I know of no international treaty that prohibits that action. However, they can only prohibit you from driving in Mexico. I think only the US state DMV that issued the license can suspend or revoke your ...


1

I was in Zimbabwe a long time ago at a better time... While in South Africa, a police officer tried to extract money from us by a "fine" for a non-existing offense, but my brother (who is in a wheelchair) was able to convince him to let us go. So, bribery can unfortunately happen at any time, but on the other side this was the only attempt during our long ...



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