Hot answers tagged

16

I was in South America (Argentina to Colombia) and in Ecuador & Colombia met a lot of people coming down from (and afterwards friends I'd met travelled up into) Central America. With just one exception (who flew), the others had all gone via the San Blas Islands. http://wikitravel.org/en/San_Blas_Islands Which to me look simply stunning! I'd seen ...


12

Several people already mentioned the sail boat option, but as none of them has done it themselves, I will add my experience from May 2009: As said elsewhere the hostels in Panama city act as intermediaries between travelers and the boats. They have a list of boats leaving on certain dates with prices which ranging from 250 to 350 US dollars. While some of ...


11

When I was in Panama City about 4 or 5 years ago all the hostels had ads posted by private people, sometimes families, that sailed back and forth in their yachts and wanted travellers to come along to help with costs. There was a waiting list for each yacht. At the time the price to sail was pretty much the same as a flight which was in the region of $300 ...


9

Timatic (the visa system used by many airlines) specifically states for a US citizen visiting Columbia : Visitors traveling as tourist are required to hold proof of sufficient funds to cover their stay and documents required for their next destination. Warning: - Visitors, traveling as tourist, not holding return/onward tickets could ...


7

In general, a citizen can't be denied to enter his own country that's sort of the meaning of being a citizen. Since you still have a valid passport there should be absolutely no problems. You are not a visitor, you are a citizen and all you need to do is convince the border guard you are a citizen. Even an expired passport would quite probably work but in ...


7

Asking for Information, the Right Way You ask for a cost-/effort-effective solution to procuring insulin in Colombia. The fact that most authoritative websites on the topic only explain how to pack supplies, and how many to pack (see Diabetes UK for an example) somewhat hints to the fact that you are not guaranteed to be able to always find, and buy, ...


7

Yes you can. If you go on the El Dorado Airport official website, they have a health section where they detail those services. You can get a free vaccine any day of the week between 7 and 7, including yellow fever. Just go to the Fontibon Hospital area on the second floor of the airport. It seems you might need basic Spanish to explain what you want ...


6

I just found an answer on yahoo anwsers (Portuguese). There are boats that take you from Manaus to Leticia. You just buy the ticket directly in the boat, there are no agencies. The schedule is a bit irregular but as a rule of thumb they go out every other day. The journey takes around 5 to 7 days. If two boats depart on the same day (apparently it can ...


5

I've heard several reports that the Darien Gap is quite dangerous due to drug trafficking. Personally, I would fly although I understand it's possible to cross by hopping on small boats on the Caribbean side. One of the Lonely Planet books (sorry I forgot which one) has more details, but they also don't recommend it.


5

Apparently scheduled sea options are very limited or nonexistent. As mentioned, last year when I quickly checked, the flights (via mainland Colombia) I found were really expensive (like 800+ USD)... But now that I'm aware of despegar.com (cheap flight search engine for Latin America), I know a bit better. As Karlson mentioned, the main airport of the ...


5

Currently, no. There is no road connecting the two countries. Briefly and recently, a ferry ran between Panama and Colombia. However, it seems it is no longer available: Their Facebook page is empty, their website is suspended. Outdated information at Wikioverland suggests the ferry didn't run for most of 2015 either.


4

First of all - every contract of carriage I've ever seen says it is the responsibility of the passenger to have the proper paperwork and it is not the airline's responsibility to provide return transportation of you are denied entry to a country. I know this is an old thread but may be useful to others in 2016. I have traveled extensively to Colombia ...


4

I bussed in, but was not asked. However from experience, almost any country 'might' ask you for onward travel, and they seem more likely to ask at airports - as allowing someone into another country without an exit strategy, or allowing you into their country without a way out can lead to someone getting fined (an airline, for example). What I've seen many ...


4

Not sure if ferries are available to St Andres but you can certainly look at the official site for more details but from the Wiki page all I could find is that by sea you can only reach the island on a cruise ship. Of course the island does have an airport so you can get there by plane. Most of the services are via Colombia(Bogota, Medellin, Cartagena) or ...


4

despegar.com is a flight search engine for Latin America that seems pretty good. (I found out about it recently when someone here on Travel SE mentioned it.) You should be able to buy the tickets directly through despegar, but I have no experience of how well that works. Alternatively, just use it to find airlines / schedules / prices, and then book via ...


4

While I don't have any personal experience with this particular scenario, you probably don't need a visa because as a permanent resident in a Schengen country, you can travel to other Schengen countries for three months in any six-month period (and Switzerland is part of the Schengen area, even if it's not a full member of the EU). This is completely ...


4

On one on my last trips, in the immigration counter next to me, the agent was telling a traveler (with issues with dual nationality) that Colombia couldn't refuse colombian nationals the entry to Colombia, but if they want to leave the country again they had to resolve the problem with the colombian passport. So I think that you won't have problems entering ...


4

I can happily confirm that insulin is available for purchase over-the-counter in pharmacies in Colombia. I've bought some myself, I simply asked for it at a pharmacy and paid for it, I required no prescription, or any doctor's note or other evidence that I am Diabetic. I'll reiterate that I did check that my specific types of insulin were available in ...


4

According to the Barranquilla’s carnival 2016 program, the festival takes place at many different locations around the city: So you would have to go to different streets/stadiums depending on which day you'll be there. There is also a detailed plan of the route which is incredibly useful since Via 40 is very long.


4

Barranquilla to Cartagena took me just under 1 hour and 30 minutes a few days ago. I did this by bus for 23000 COP which comes to roughly 9 CDN or 6 USD. A few days before I did it the opposite way for the same price and it took 1 hour and 20 minutes. Taking a taxi you can expect to save time as you wont have to shuffle between the airports and bus ...


4

Just got back from three weeks in Colombia. Here are notes based off my travel in Jan 2016. I'll be comparing prices to US dollars. Exchange rate The exchange rate is approximately 1 USD = 3300 COP at the time of this writing. To estimate prices, you're better off just dividing any price you see by 3000 to get a fair estimate of its USD price after any ...


4

Bus it to Aipe then Taxi Rome2Rio suggests a bus from Salento to Pereira, followed by another bus from Pereira to Aipe, and from there a Taxi to Villavieja. Below is a screenshot of the suggested route: Quoting from the Terminal Pereira website, the scheduled departures for Aipe are: Buses to/from Salento seem to depart/arrive every 2 hours. Public ...


4

Sorry for the late answer. You shouldn't pay any hotel tax in Colombia, even if they insist. Anyone traveling on a tourist visa is exempt from paying taxes on any hotel registered with the National Tourism Register (which I understand is a requirement for every hotel in the country) or a travel package. I own a tourism company in Colombia and cleared this ...


4

Disclaimer: I've not been to Colombia yet, but I have it on good authority that this is one of the most typically Colombian street foods, and I've tried it from Colombian places in other countries and it's pretty distinctive. Arepas They're a kind of stodgy corn (maize) bread, often served with cheese. Surprisingly filling, good for breakfast or after ...


4

Buses seem to be quite reliable in terms of schedule in Colombia. There are plenty of departures and they usually go faster than the predicted time. I took several buses, usually in the evening and always arrived 30min to 1h ahead of schedule. The quoted time could be to account for traffic at other hours. For longer distances, there are overnight buses but ...


3

I took these guys about three months ago and had luggage that was 20 - 25 kilos. It was not a problem whatsoever. And, my luggage wasn't close to the smallest nor lightest of what the passengers were transporting on my trip.


3

Short answer: It depends. Long answer: If you are traveling to important cities (Bogota, Medellin, Barranquilla, Cali). The norm is a 5mbps minimum. In towns far away from main cities, could range from nightmare to 10mb. 3G coverage in most parts of the country is generally good.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible