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12

I was in South America (Argentina to Colombia) and in Ecuador & Colombia met a lot of people coming down from (and afterwards friends I'd met travelled up into) Central America. With just one exception (who flew), the others had all gone via the San Blas Islands. http://wikitravel.org/en/San_Blas_Islands Which to me look simply stunning! I'd seen ...


9

When I was in Panama City about 4 or 5 years ago all the hostels had ads posted by private people, sometimes families, that sailed back and forth in their yachts and wanted travellers to come along to help with costs. There was a waiting list for each yacht. At the time the price to sail was pretty much the same as a flight which was in the region of $300 ...


9

Several people already mentioned the sail boat option, but as none of them has done it themselves, I will add my experience from May 2009: As said elsewhere the hostels in Panama city act as intermediaries between travelers and the boats. They have a list of boats leaving on certain dates with prices which ranging from 250 to 350 US dollars. While some of ...


7

According to the Netindex list, where Colombia is on number 105, the average download speed is 5.45Mbps. The list doesn't distinguish between internet cafes, hostels or flats.


7

Timatic (the visa system used by many airlines) specifically states for a US citizen visiting Columbia : Visitors traveling as tourist are required to hold proof of sufficient funds to cover their stay and documents required for their next destination. Warning: - Visitors, traveling as tourist, not holding return/onward tickets could ...


5

despegar.com is a flight search engine for Latin America that seems pretty good. (I found out about it recently when someone here on Travel SE mentioned it.) You should be able to buy the tickets directly through despegar, but I have no experience of how well that works. Alternatively, just use it to find airlines / schedules / prices, and then book via ...


5

I've heard several reports that the Darien Gap is quite dangerous due to drug trafficking. Personally, I would fly although I understand it's possible to cross by hopping on small boats on the Caribbean side. One of the Lonely Planet books (sorry I forgot which one) has more details, but they also don't recommend it.


5

I just found an answer on yahoo anwsers (Portuguese). There are boats that take you from Manaus to Leticia. You just buy the ticket directly in the boat, there are no agencies. The schedule is a bit irregular but as a rule of thumb they go out every other day. The journey takes around 5 to 7 days. If two boats depart on the same day (apparently it can ...


4

When I flew into Colombia, I noticed that neither the airline nor immigration asked me about return/onward travel. However, during a couple of subsequent trips, my departure ticket was checked: Before issuing my boarding pass to travel to Paraguay, the airline service rep asked for my onward flight number and entered it into her computer. When I got to ...


4

I bussed in, but was not asked. However from experience, almost any country 'might' ask you for onward travel, and they seem more likely to ask at airports - as allowing someone into another country without an exit strategy, or allowing you into their country without a way out can lead to someone getting fined (an airline, for example). What I've seen many ...


4

Apparently scheduled sea options are very limited or nonexistent. As mentioned, last year when I quickly checked, the flights (via mainland Colombia) I found were really expensive (like 800+ USD)... But now that I'm aware of despegar.com (cheap flight search engine for Latin America), I know a bit better. As Karlson mentioned, the main airport of the ...


4

Not sure if ferries are available to St Andres but you can certainly look at the official site for more details but from the Wiki page all I could find is that by sea you can only reach the island on a cruise ship. Of course the island does have an airport so you can get there by plane. Most of the services are via Colombia(Bogota, Medellin, Cartagena) or ...


4

While I don't have any personal experience with this particular scenario, you probably don't need a visa because as a permanent resident in a Schengen country, you can travel to other Schengen countries for three months in any six-month period (and Switzerland is part of the Schengen area, even if it's not a full member of the EU). This is completely ...


3

If the passport number, and the passport number listed on the visa, do not match then this mismatch could cause serious difficulties during travel. For example, a border control officer could conclude that she was somehow trying to use somebody else's visa to enter the country. She should contact the US agency which issued her visa, tell them about the ...


2

First of all, the location description is very vague. You can cross the boarder from Colombia into Ecuador by foot. Those are neighboring countries. I assume therefore that you want to start from a larger city, like Cartagena and go to Guayaquil. However, from Cartagena, you are in for more than 2000km. Panama, on the other hand is still 1500km away. Which ...


1

San Gil is on the way to Bucaramanga, so any bus in the route Bucaramanga <-> Bogotá may stop there. But of course in Colombia it is important to cross check in advance. I found a company called Berlinas that has a line: http://www.berlinasdelfonce.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=80&Itemid=5 Recorrido (route, it ...


1

This is kinda tough... I'm pretty sure there are overnight buses, but San Gil is a small town so it's not going to show as a "destination" stop or "departure" point you can find when you search for fares. Likely you'll have to call the bus company and ask what routes would go near or pass by your San Gil.. and if they even pick up people there. Search online ...



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