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25

If you define safe as 'not contracting a water-borne disease', then yes, you will be safe from contracting typhoid, jaundice, etc when you drink tea/coffee from street-side vendors. Boiling during the preparation effectively kills of the disease-causing germs, even if kept in covered kettles/pots as they usually are. A dirty clay cup would not cause a ...


13

Anything boiled should be safe to drink, and the dust on the cups shouldn't really be a problem, either. In my experience, most things in India tend to have a layer of dust on them no matter how fastidious you are. :) I disagree with @hippietrail about using "popular" places to judge their safety - popularity can be an indicator, but it's not a guarantee ...


12

There are combination French press/coffee mug thingies which are very practical. You only need coarsely ground coffee and *Just Add (Boiling) Water (tm). If you shudder at the thought of pre-ground coffee, you can complement this with a small manual coffee grinder. Bonus points: you can use the same device to make tea as well.


10

In general, you have to be careful. Like @hippietrail already mentions in the comments, the more popular the place is, the more safe it will be. But... it's not always because it's safe for the locals that it will be safe for you! Especially if you're only traveling there for a couple of weeks, and you're not used to foreign food, I'd advice you not to ...


10

Have you considered an Aeropress? I've been using one for around two years now, and I'm very happy with the quality of the coffee it produces. As far as travel suitability goes, I think it would be a good fit for hotel room brewing, provided you have access to hot water and coffee grounds. It's compact enough to fit in luggage, easy to use and clean, and ...


8

In big Polish cities be prepared to pay around 10 PLN, which is about $3, in Starbucks and similar for a black coffee. In McDonalds you will pay around half of it. It goes down to around $1 in smaller cafeterias outside of the city center. But as usually, it highly varies.


7

I will recommend you to avoid any such food which has been prepared in open while you are in India, there are lots of reasons for it: preparation in unclean situation by people with unwashed hands. bad quality raw materials, very unclean utensils they serve it in. Many people living and travelling to India can suggest to you that nothing wrong will ...


7

Nothing as subjective as what a decent cup of coffee constitutes. Some shiver at the thought of instant coffee, others (like me) shiver at the thought of cold brewed coffee. If you like instant coffee life is easy as most hotels (at least in Europe) come with complimentary instant coffee and teabags. For the grain coffee lovers, getting your daily shot ...


6

I'm not sure that any caf├ęs will have this on the menu to be honest. What you could try doing is purchasing a bag of the beans and then taking it to a good barista and ask them to brew it for you. No guarantees that will work, but it might be worth a try. Particularly if you catch them when they're not too busy. If you are on a quest to taste some great ...


6

I would head to your local outdoor / camping store and see what they have. "Cowboy" coffee is no longer good enough for camping (not that it ever was). I have a one-cup Lexan French press that makes very good coffee, and has the benefit of giving you a place to store a zip-loc bag of fresh grounds. I couldn't find an exact match, but here are some ...


5

Certainly in the UK there are many coffee shops which can provide lactose free lattes. The most common is the use of Soya milk instead of real milk. So this includes Starbucks in many countries, but also smaller coffee chains, and some local coffee houses.


4

I guess this question is quite different from people to people and place to place as well. For example, if you're travelling in Asia there will be not much choices anyway because most of the local coffee shops are not that great. In that sense, I'd stick with Starbucks because of all the facilities; Internet, bathroom, etc. But if you're up for something ...


4

I think the answers are the same as on the other question, but let me try and be coffee specific. I should also note that I have about that exact situation and I still go to Starbucks everyday and have never tried the other places, but I know I like Starbucks coffee (and I know not everyone does and there are probably better places). Assuming I had wanted to ...


4

You can buy an electric moka which only requires some current and fresh water: The coffee from mokas is stronger than coffee people usually drink in USA (or other countries outside EU/Latin America), since it passes through the ground coffee at higher pressure (about 1.5 atmospheres I believe). You can read more information on the wikipedia page. They ...


4

Really cheap. It depends on the exact place you take it, but though it's not difficult to take a coffee for less than $.50 in a city center (I was at Poland last April). Of course, if you go to Starbucks, it will be more expensive, but in general it is cheaper than a Starbucks in USA.


4

Although nowhere near as ubiquitous as in the US, coffee shops are relatively common in major Thai cities, especially those with high tourist numbers (eg, Bangkok, Chang Mai). In addition to over 100 Starbucks stores around the country you'll also find countless McDonalds, many of which have "McCafe" and - depending on the area - many western style coffee ...


4

As mentioned in Choster's comment, there are some wild coffee plants in Ethiopia, you can go and pick coffee cherries for sure. Anyway, that's not the case for drinking the coffee you picked. It needs to be processed. Processing coffee has few different methods, the one that is mostly used in Ethiopia is called "dry process", this method can take up to 4 ...


3

The first question to answer is if the people of the country normally do coffe. No - we don't normally drink coffee here The best bet then is to look for an american-looking chain. This may still suck but is likely the best bet to get something decent. Even better (but rarer) is to look for one of the Italian coffee brands like Illy or Segafreddo sometims ...


3

First of all, globally speaking, lactose tolerance is the deviation and not lactose intolerance. Just about one fourth of the world's population keep the ability to digest lactose after growing up/breast feeding, an ability achieved through genetic selection and most prominent in the cattle keeping population of northern Europe. In Sweden, only 2% of the ...


3

In my opinion the first time you eat the street food & drink you can get sick but after that you get used to it. The second thing to be aware of is that if you does not want to use street food & drink, you can use other costly places where all the food & drink is made cleanly & tidy. It depends on you, otherwise street food is good in taste. ...


2

My best tip for La Paz would be to find a decent taxi driver and ask him to take you to some place where they have the beans. Offer him a bonus if he makes you happy. Remember not to wrap the beans in plastic. They should be stored somewhere dry and cool. I forgot to take some beans I bought out of their plastic bag and ruined them. Also remember that ...


2

There are many, many coffee places here at the moment. Thailand goes through full-on phases - last year there was the fish massage parlours (i.e. you put your feet in a tank full of fish that eat the dead skin) - it was such a good business for 5 minutes that every other shop became one (they were even in Tescos!) - now they are all but gone. Right now ...


2

For a start, Starbucks Thailand exists. So if you're desperate, at least you know you can get a recognisable drink and service at that. It's like McDonald's, as a tourist you don't usually want to have it, but at least you know what you're getting. And they do have cappuccinos ;)


2

Some 30 months since it was part of the accepted answer I'd like to disagree with A dirty clay cup would not cause a disease either as that's not the route for transmission of most of those diseases The good news: It is not generally appreciated that just bringing water to about 90 degrees C will kill almost all pathogens instantly (as stated in the ...


2

In addition to @RoryAlsop's answer Starbucks and Dunkin Donuts provide lattes and other caffeinated drinks with Soy Milk in the US. Most of the smaller coffee shops in the US do too.


1

Yes, you can bring the coffee maker and coffee. provided they are within your import limit of Rs.35000. You may please refer the link for further details. http://www.cbec.gov.in/trvler-guide_ason22may2013.pdf


1

I always use Foursquare by searching "coffee" in whatever is the local language and then choosing the place with the biggest number of mentions. Starbucks is the obvious choice in most countries since it provides pretty much the same level of quality everywhere.


1

Tea & coffee is boiled, thus safe. This is true at any altitude tea is served . I have lived by this many months in Leh, same altitude as Lhasa, and on the road there with tea stalls a thousand meters higher. Water is safe by mouth long before it reaches 100 degrees, given time. See here for more on this, with sources.


1

Surely there are variety of places in India on what you can eat and cannot. Look for something Hygienic Place to start with ( Now a days there are lots of them). Food is cooked ( Do not eat in hurry. You need your stomach in good condition in India). Use Known Mineral Water Only ( aquafina, bisleri, eg.). If you are visiting any villages and have done ...



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