Hot answers tagged

83

If you're willing to pay a bit to avoid hassle, Frankfurt Airport has 5 shower facilities scattered throughout its terminals that can be rented for 6 euros. The stalls aren't exactly luxurious, but they're fully separated, private and kept very clean, so you can change in comfort and take a shower if you feel like it. Most larger airports worldwide offer ...


50

JPatokal gives the answer for FRA, but in every restroom in every US airport there is a handicapped stall, where it is easy to change, and typically two clothing hooks to help you.


48

Given that some airlines even give you a complimentary pyjama when flying in first class I'd say that it would be perfectly legal for you to wear one on the plane regardless of which class you're flying in. Worst case scenario you'll get some looks from other passengers. Go ahead and fly comfortable.


41

Right after security checks (at least in the terminal I used) there were two changing rooms that are probably used for extra security checks. I asked the security staff if I could use it to get changed and their response was "sure, of course" so I went ahead and did. Indeed nobody even seemed to care. The changing room featured a chair, enough space and ...


29

I'll try to address this question impartially despite my strong feelings against Mandatory Hijaab for women (I'm a male, born and raised in Iran who lives in United States now) I'll define the terms first and then will mention what is minimally required by the law. Hijaab (means veil in Arabic) is a religious term. It's definition varies across cultures, ...


22

Yes, you can wear your pajamas during a flight. You might get some strange looks, but there is nothing wrong with wearing them. Other options would be a 'sweat suit' with elastic at the waist and a t-shirt and hoodie for the top.


20

I visited last year. My pure understanding of the law there obviously isn't perfect as an outsider, but the following of the 'law' seemed very rough, women would wear a covering, but sometimes only over the bob of a pony-tail, for example. However, if in a place of business, eg a hotel or restaurant, you'd regularly see proprietors or staff quickly address ...


20

I think you have covered all the typical reasons; I would also avoid T-Shirts with images of guns, explosives, etc. The link you shared with a woman with very short shorts could be seen by some as underwear. But back in the day, Southwest Airlines in the United States used to have their "Stewardesses" wear hot-pants.


17

That depends on the cultural background of the country you are flying (from and to), and how relatively conservative or liberal the decision maker is. Generally, if it gets you in a good restaurant (in that country), you will have no problems on the airplane. Edit: I should have said 'medium level restaurant', I didn't mean 'upscale', just not 'cheapo' ...


15

Unless you're concerned about your appearance prior to boarding the flight for some reason, I see no reason not to take @cgcampbell's advice. I have to wear a metallic brace for an arthritic knee, so I either wear comfortable shorts, or a pair of (equally comfortable) zip-off pants so I can easily show the brace to security agents (TSA here in the US). I ...


13

I am a Brit that lives in NZ, and I can tell you there is nothing quite like Primark. The closest would be The Warehouse or kMart, (Farmers is more expensive than both, but quality and range is larger). However, these still aren't as cheap, the range is a lot smaller, (given that clothing is only a small part of what they offer) and the quality isn't the ...


13

A few suggestions of various locations which might work depending on your situation and locale: Find a local gym or hotel or any other place that may have a changing room or private space, and ask if you may change in a private area at their facilities. Being polite and asking nicely will go a long way. For gyms you may have to pay for a day pass, but this ...


12

You should buy your clothes in Kiruna. There are plenty of excellent outdoor stores in the city centre. Although it is regularly -25°C to -30°C in the valleys outside the city (where tours such as sled dogging tours take place), it's not cold in the city centre, where temperatures rarely drop down below -20°C (you might be surprised that a dry, calm, and ...


11

Do not pack the suit! why spend time ironing/pressing the suit at the hotel/accommodation while you can carry them as they are with you? Put them in a travel suit bag, something like this: Once in the plane, ask a cabin crew member to hang it for you, in every plane there is a coat compartment and they will be happy to do that for you. This is what I ...


11

I'm not familiar with Primark, but in New Zealand you can find inexpensive clothing at The Warehouse, Kmart, possibly Farmers, and probably others. In general, goods available in New Zealand will not be as cheap as you might be accustomed to. There are many reasons for this (not the least of which is NZ is a small, remote market), but it all adds up to ...


11

As of today (March 17, 2016), there are no H&M, Zara, Primark, or Uniqlo stores in NZ. There is one Topshop, though, at 203 Queen St, Auckland, and H&M will be opening an Auckland location in 2016, too. Maybe the Google search for [new zealand fast fashion chain] will yield more useful information. You can also check Wikipedia's list of fast ...


11

Company chiefs sent out a memo informing female staff they would be required "to wear trousers during the flight with a loose fitting jacket and a scarf covering their hair on leaving the plane", Mr Pillet said. First off, nobody is obliged to wear any kind of hijab unless they leave the plane: Company chiefs sent out a memo informing female ...


9

Preface: I'm not a designer or a clotheshorse so these descriptions may be a bit rough Abaya just means "cloak"; there are many kinds of abaya, just like there are many kinds of jackets/coats. Just like most other things, the interpretation of the abaya varies differently from one region to the next. For example in the UAE abayas have large flowing sleeves ...


8

For men, shorts aren't acceptable in public areas. T-shirts are ok (except in mosques). The only place were you will see people wearing shorts is around beach areas. So men's legs have to be covered... In mosques, men usually have to wear long-sleeved shirts rather than t-shirts.


8

It is easier to answer the question the way you worded it than the other way around. Finding a list of items that will get you kicked out of a plane probably depends on local customs and the pilot's mood! What will not have you kicked out of a plane is easier. For men, trousers without holes which cover entirely undergarments. A woman can wear pants too but ...


8

It's not a rule on paper that decides what's allowed, it's a human with their own history and beliefs who has that authority - if you can't board the flight it doesn't exactly help you that the airline apologizes to you afterwards because the decision to throw you off was clearly wrong. People get thrown off flights for the most ridiculous reasons, so my ...


7

as someone who only wears sweatpants/sweatshirts on planes, nobody will question it. I show up in them, but changing in the bathroom shouldn't cause an issue as long as you can stuff your other clothes into your carry-on. Just make sure, as @Joe Blow said, your pajamas don't let anything illegal out.


7

It's actually really easy and common, it turns out. Pity, as I bought a suit in Canada in advance. If you come out of Sa'adi metro station, and walk west - between the station and Ferdowsi avenue on both sides, there are a LOT of suit hire places. Many of them have tuxes as their show pieces in the window, but have regular suit hire too. I've seen it ...


7

Legally, they have to wear Hijab, but hijab comes in many different styles, they do not approve of all styles, at least not the religious police. The favorite style for the religious police is called the chādor, which was somehow enforced by the religious police after the revolution in 1979. The Chador looks like the Niqab for the foreigners, but it's ...


6

One thing to be careful of is that many laundry machines in Japan are now the super-high efficient kind that need very low or non-sudsing detergent. Detergent that's now sold in Japan is fine, but if you bring detergent from your home country, it may be high-sudsing -- which can cause the machine to overflow with suds or even damage it. So regardless of ...


6

Quebec city has a tough winter but, while I have never spent a winter in Ohio, I suppose you might experience something similar. The temperature in Quebec city in February is probably more in the -10/-20F (-20/-30C), the 5F (-15C) are usually reached as soon as December and Wikipedia lists 5F (-15C) as the average morning temperature. It is probably worth ...


6

The key is not magical trousers, but long winter coats. You can get these long and parka-style down to the knees (random example), and they let you keep warm while wearing basically normal office/home wear underneath. Alternatively, many women opt to just wear a "normal" parka, leggings and warm boots and minimize the time they spend outside, since all ...


6

Women in public in Iran are legally required to cover up their hair, to wear long sleeves and long pants. How they achieve this is up to them. So, particularly in urban areas, many women only will wear a scarf to cover their hair, while in often more rural areas, you'll more likely see a chador. Any other clothing for this, like a niqab or burqa, is very ...


5

The most likely answer is: whatever the check-in employees think. For example there's a well-known video by Jaktogo.com where a man succesfully transforms a bag into a 'coat', allowing him to bring it on-board (on Ryanair!): If you can convince the airline employees that your 'bag' is a 'vest', you're good to go. If you can't, you'll have to pay extra or ...


5

Vince is right about the temperature range, -20 is more plausible, don't forget to factor windchill as Quebec City is relatively flat, but you should know that coming from Ohio. The most important thing to remember is that you'll be standing still for a long time. You should opt for thick soles to isolate you from the ground and protect extremities. I ...



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