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19

For the general area, there's no dress code - you even see people wandering through in their swimming gear after they've been in the pool! I've been in wearing tshirt and jeans, feeling underdressed until I saw the tourists in their tshirt and shorts with flip-flops. However, you may wish to consider what else you want to do in Vegas, and dress ...


15

In most Muslim countries, keeping the arms and legs (and of course the cleavage) covered would be considered completely sufficient, especially for someone who is visibly a foreigner. Some (e.g. Turkey, at least the bigger cities) are much more tolerant and nobody will feel offended by bare arms or legs. The strictest dress code exists in Saudi Arabia, ...


13

There is for example this company that has a website where they list all the coin-laundries (コインランドリー). You will have to know how to read addresses in Japanese at least to use this. There are tons of others, also usually found in remote areas: coin-laundry.co.jp ciao-net.jp mocomoco-jp.com super-laundry.net (google for コインランドリー 店舗一覧 to find more) In ...


12

Here are some of the 'hacks' that I've used: It's winter, there's often a heater on, or heatpump, or fire. Try and hang the clothes near to (but not on) the heater. Turn them frequently - you don't want them getting too hot or burnt. Use air - moving air. Hang in a doorway for the internal flow, or if possible, outside during the day. Beware to take ...


11

There is indeed some statute suggesting something like that, namely § 132a StGB (which means “paragraph 132a” in the penal code): (1) Wer unbefugt […] inländische oder ausländische Uniformen, Amtskleidungen oder Amtsabzeichen trägt, wird mit Freiheitsstrafe bis zu einem Jahr oder mit Geldstrafe bestraft. which could be translated as “A person ...


10

Whenever I go to Europe I am struck by how differently the European men dress than North American ones. First and foremost, their feet. They almost never wear running shoes. Their shoes are small and fit close to the foot. They are never white, and if you see the same man on several different days he may very well wear a different pair of shoes each day, to ...


9

TL;DR Use weatherspark to find the time-of-year that weather in your hometown corresponds to the weather at the time and place you'll be visiting. Compare Historical Data with a Place You Know It used to be a real pain to try to figure out how the weather was likely to be at a new-to-me destination at some future time. In the last few years, however, I ...


8

Generally there is no strict dress code on the casino floors (within reason), so Jeans and T-Shirt would be just fine. There is a blog entry on the subject from Las Vegas Direct and also on TripAdvisor. There is also a somewhat decent FAQ regarding age restrictions. If you get into an exclusive area where stakes are rather large you might be required to ...


8

When I hiked through Japan in 1999 I mainly was guided by the Lonely Planet edition of that year. Every hotel/inn/B&B I stayed had modern (western style)- do it yourself - washing machines. I never experienced any problem. I don't know the situation when you get of the lonely planet track


8

For Kuala Lumpur you should dress however you are comfortable (okay, not naked, you need to have some level of modesty); you'll be okay walking around the city in a sleeveless t-shirt, shorts and flip-flops/thongs. You probably won't be dressed appropriately for some venues, but you're fine for standard tourist activities. This dress is a bit uncommon for ...


8

Layers. Bring several. The average temperatures you quote are very misleading. Two years ago I was there in July and, while I would concur with the average, temperatures varied between 4C and 20C. That means that I used a thin long-sleeve top and was slightly hot around noon and was quite cold with a jacket, sweater plus long-sleeve top at night. Light ...


7

No, it is not illegal, but it is still not advisable if not applied very carefully. The highest German civil court, the Bundesgerichtshof, has defined the rules to §132a, at March 15th, 2011 (4 StR 40/11): Allerdings ist der Tatbestand des § 132a StGB in beiden Tatvarianten nur erfüllt, wenn es sich bei der jeweiligen Uniform bzw. dem Amtsabzeichen um ...


7

You'll definitely want a pair of sturdy water-resistant hiking boots. If possible, break them in before your trip. And some thick, warm socks. Coming from a hot country and going to a climate where it's -5 °C, you might want some long underwear to wear under your clothing when you're outside. You didn't specify what dates you'll be there or how active ...


7

Nah, you should be fine in Europe. Fashion change all the time. In winter I often wear waterproof jacket, that has some bright colors, and don't think that is something, that stand out. It depends on the jacket itself, but especially in autumn and winter, in cities, wearing bright colored hiking or skiing jackets would be something completely normal. Thus ...


7

Staffed laundries are more common in Japan than laundromats, but hotels, ryokan and minshuku will often have washing machines you can use as well. Washing machines are fully automatic, the cold water is compensated for by more aggressive detergents. So it could be that detergent you bring along would not be effective.


7

You did not really specify where exactly you want to go, but since you mentioned Jungfrau region, I assume that you're talking about Jungfraujoch. As Kathryn Hill already mentioned, it can get very cold up there. But this is not only the case in winter. Since it is around 3500 meters above sea level, it is cold year round up there. Even now in autumn, it ...


7

To speed up drying of clothes (particularly if staying in hotels where you have laundered towels), you can wring your clothes as dry as possible, place them (individually) on top of a towel and then roll the towel/clothing article up as tight as possible. Then stand on this roll. The aim being to absorb as much water as possible out from the clothes into ...


5

England's Medieval Festival is the largest of its kind in the UK. This year it will take place at Herstmonceux Castle East Sussex, UK on the 24th, 25th and 26th August 2013. Held annually since 1992 over the three days of the August Bank Holiday Weekend, England's Medieval Festival at Herstmonceux Castle is Britain's largest and most magnificant ...


5

A brief Google turns up Carisbrooke Castle and the Bodiam Castle for a start; the National Trust are big on recreating authentic experiences at their places. If you've got some special interest I'm sure they're pretty approachable by email too, in case they only normally get the chain mail out for crushing children on school visits (how people fought in ...


5

This might seem obvious to some, and completely out of the question to others, but it's what I do: Wash your laundry before going to a new hotel. I do it in the hotel sink at night before going to bed, and by morning my clothes are usually completely dry. Of course, this can depend a lot on your clothing, and the material from which they are made. I make ...


5

I just got back from Panama, and while it technically wasn't yet the rainy season, it was getting there. Here are some thing that might be helpful. Rainy season doesn't mean it rains all the time. It means frequent thundershowers. In between it can be warm and sunny It's very warm. The main difference that makes is that even if you get wet, you won't get ...


5

My recommendation - dress like you normally would. What matters most is being comfortable - if you want to avoid drawing attention to yourself as to avoid pickpocketers...don't scream at everyone in English and keep your head up! Always be aware of your surroundings - pay attention to a map and know where you are at all times. Not "acting" like a tourist, ...


5

So generally, no, there is almost no country that has an issue with particular clothing of any kind. HOWEVER, there are two major caveats: sports teams, and gangs. For example, wearing a La Boca soccer jersey at the La Plata stadium in Buenos Aires could see you in a bit of trouble. And wearing the wrong gang's colours in another gang's neighbourhood in ...


5

I would suggest a thin jacket to protect you from cold wind and a thin sweater that you can put over whatever you are wearing. Both together should protect you enough. The temperature might drop end of December/January some more so the later you come the colder it gets, sometimes down to 8 degrees. Right now it's 25 for example. What I have to tell you ...


5

In addition to the weather, you need to also consider social and cultural norms. For example, you may be obliged to keep your knees covered in a place that is warm enough for shorts, or need to cover your head when normally you don't. You may be going to restaurants that demand men wear ties, or forbid beach shoes. To investigate these norms, a suggestion ...


4

The other answers cover the legal part pretty thoroughly. Being German, here is some personal experience: As long as you don't show any sign (country flag, badge, any other affiliation) you are pretty much on the safe side, especially if the cut of the clothing does not resemble uniforms currently in use. I know several people who use old police jackets as ...


4

Don't worry too much about the bright jacket. I've traveled and lived in Europe and you see all kinds of clothes — everything from sleek and modern to huge puffy coats. And a lot of the countries you're going to visit will be pretty rainy during that time of year so a good rain jacket is a must. I recommend that you just enjoy your time in Europe!


4

I would recommend you to go to one of the malls in the area. The malls in the 3rd tier cities have more and more factory outlets inside where you can buy quite cheap branded (genuine) goods. Personally I have never seen used clothes shops in China either. What you can try alternatively are "wet markets" or street markets. There is no guarantee of course if ...



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