Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

17

Vegas is a dry heat--while this is often scorned by those who don't understand the difference it means that your body can do a much better job of cooling itself than you might expect. Your body sweats, it very quickly evaporates and you are nowhere near as aware of the heat as you would think. As others have said, bring plenty to drink--although since you ...


12

You may want to look into buying clothing specifically marketed as keeping you cool. I regularly ride my bike 15 km in 30 C heat. In a white cotton tshirt, sweat runs down my arms and I have trouble gripping the handlebars. In a long sleeved "performance " shirt I feel much cooler (even in a dark blue one) and sweat far less. I also drink less water in those ...


12

Here are some of the 'hacks' that I've used: It's winter, there's often a heater on, or heatpump, or fire. Try and hang the clothes near to (but not on) the heater. Turn them frequently - you don't want them getting too hot or burnt. Use air - moving air. Hang in a doorway for the internal flow, or if possible, outside during the day. Beware to take ...


11

There is indeed some statute suggesting something like that, namely § 132a StGB (which means “paragraph 132a” in the penal code): (1) Wer unbefugt […] inländische oder ausländische Uniformen, Amtskleidungen oder Amtsabzeichen trägt, wird mit Freiheitsstrafe bis zu einem Jahr oder mit Geldstrafe bestraft. which could be translated as “A person ...


11

I'm resident in Canada and occasionally travel to Dubai to visit my parents. I am in Dubai right now and it was 44 degrees Celsius this afternoon. Note that I am used to wearing shorts even when it is lower than 0 Celsius while in Canada. Here is what I have for you: Clothing Absolutely avoid long sleeved clothing Wear shorts instead of jeans or other ...


9

TL;DR Use weatherspark to find the time-of-year that weather in your hometown corresponds to the weather at the time and place you'll be visiting. Compare Historical Data with a Place You Know It used to be a real pain to try to figure out how the weather was likely to be at a new-to-me destination at some future time. In the last few years, however, I ...


8

Layers. Bring several. The average temperatures you quote are very misleading. Two years ago I was there in July and, while I would concur with the average, temperatures varied between 4C and 20C. That means that I used a thin long-sleeve top and was slightly hot around noon and was quite cold with a jacket, sweater plus long-sleeve top at night. Light ...


8

We are Vegas locals, and love hiking. If you are going to hike in the hills, take tons of fluids. More than you think. Only because running out, cuts the fun short. Consider a hike in Mt Charleston. 20-30 degrees F cooler than downtown. Also consider hiking in Red Rock Ice Box Canyon (hint, hint -- the name). We like to trail run in the evening, after ...


7

No, it is not illegal, but it is still not advisable if not applied very carefully. The highest German civil court, the Bundesgerichtshof, has defined the rules to §132a, at March 15th, 2011 (4 StR 40/11): Allerdings ist der Tatbestand des § 132a StGB in beiden Tatvarianten nur erfüllt, wenn es sich bei der jeweiligen Uniform bzw. dem Amtsabzeichen um ...


7

You did not really specify where exactly you want to go, but since you mentioned Jungfrau region, I assume that you're talking about Jungfraujoch. As Kathryn Hill already mentioned, it can get very cold up there. But this is not only the case in winter. Since it is around 3500 meters above sea level, it is cold year round up there. Even now in autumn, it ...


7

You'll definitely want a pair of sturdy water-resistant hiking boots. If possible, break them in before your trip. And some thick, warm socks. Coming from a hot country and going to a climate where it's -5 °C, you might want some long underwear to wear under your clothing when you're outside. You didn't specify what dates you'll be there or how active ...


7

To speed up drying of clothes (particularly if staying in hotels where you have laundered towels), you can wring your clothes as dry as possible, place them (individually) on top of a towel and then roll the towel/clothing article up as tight as possible. Then stand on this roll. The aim being to absorb as much water as possible out from the clothes into ...


7

Don't think you can walk at your normal pace when it's much hotter than you're used to. Take it easy and allow longer than you think it'll take to walk anywhere. Force yourself to walk more slowly any time you catch yourself going quickly.


6

Hydrate and cover your head, yes. Lightweight clothing, yes within reason but not gossamer see-through stuff. Colour is less of a big deal than you might expect but all else being equal you'll be a bit warmer in darker clothing, so avoid it. karancan already mentions sunscreen. I find that sunburn is orders of magnitude more uncomfortable than just missing ...


5

No, there are no dress codes at temples or shrines. The Japanese attitude to religion is very relaxed... and simultaneously strict, as entry to anything even vaguely holy is generally entirely prohibited. That said, the prevailing Japanese opinion is that men's shorts above the knee are for elementary school students and the beach, although nobody will ...


5

In addition to the weather, you need to also consider social and cultural norms. For example, you may be obliged to keep your knees covered in a place that is warm enough for shorts, or need to cover your head when normally you don't. You may be going to restaurants that demand men wear ties, or forbid beach shoes. To investigate these norms, a suggestion ...


5

I would suggest a thin jacket to protect you from cold wind and a thin sweater that you can put over whatever you are wearing. Both together should protect you enough. The temperature might drop end of December/January some more so the later you come the colder it gets, sometimes down to 8 degrees. Right now it's 25 for example. What I have to tell you ...


5

There is a store in Itaewon called DMZ. The guy there sells pretty much everything an if something is not available in the shop he can get it for you within hours. I was there recently and can confirm that he sells these boots. Someone even made a video how to find this shop, and you can watch it here http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aqKEQ6B2b6s It is not ...


5

So generally, no, there is almost no country that has an issue with particular clothing of any kind. HOWEVER, there are two major caveats: sports teams, and gangs. For example, wearing a La Boca soccer jersey at the La Plata stadium in Buenos Aires could see you in a bit of trouble. And wearing the wrong gang's colours in another gang's neighbourhood in ...


4

The other answers cover the legal part pretty thoroughly. Being German, here is some personal experience: As long as you don't show any sign (country flag, badge, any other affiliation) you are pretty much on the safe side, especially if the cut of the clothing does not resemble uniforms currently in use. I know several people who use old police jackets as ...


4

There is very little in terms of online information on where US Army surplus stuff is available in Seoul. The best information available is a thread on the Waygook Forum and similar threads on ESLCafe Forum, and Airsoft Korea. I could not find any references to these shops to have online presence, so walking into a store carrying Army Surplus items might ...


4

I would recommend you to go to one of the malls in the area. The malls in the 3rd tier cities have more and more factory outlets inside where you can buy quite cheap branded (genuine) goods. Personally I have never seen used clothes shops in China either. What you can try alternatively are "wet markets" or street markets. There is no guarantee of course if ...


4

According to WHO reports, there are a substantial number of Malaria cases in Peru and Panama, and Costa Rica suffers from Dengue fever so it would seem advisable to be careful there. I don't think there are diseases spread by mosquitoes in Patagonia, but they can be very annoying nonetheless.


4

The weather in south it is often wet and windy, the north slightly less so, but can get some nasty cold spells, although it shouldn't be too extreme in July. For going high up in the mountains or travelling in the mid-interior you would need of course to be prepared for much lower temperatures and sometimes extreme weather. The main thing to think about is ...


4

My wife and I have done many trips where the extent of our washing of clothes has been done in the bathroom sink. If you're in a location for a couple of days it's very easy to do washing the first day and leave them around your room to dry (after wringing them out of course), and it's best (as choster commented) to take clothes that dry quickly. There ...


3

In many parts of the world, including remote villages of 3rd world nations, people have a special set of clothes, their "Sunday go to meeting" outfit. Clothes that they wear only on special occasions, a village ceremony, going to the temple, the marriage of their children or the death of their parents. Sometimes these outfits are simply a nice sarong or a ...


3

My trick is to observe what locals do, humans tend to change their clothing style and sometimes diet to adopt better to their climate. For example, in the Middle East where it is hot and sunny people usually wear white cotton clothes, cover their heads and wear loose clothes. In other hot countries like far east they wear shorts and sleeveless clothes ...


3

The general advice is to choose clothes that dry quickly. These are made of synthetic fabrics. Onebag.com has many sections about clothes and laundry: Choosing clothes Doing laundry A packing list: Wardrobe


3

I live in Edinburgh and in August I'm sweating if I go out wearing jeans in the daytime, especially if it's sunny but often even if not. I'd advise wearing thin/loose trousers and a T-shirt, then take several layers (thin jumper and maybe a waterproof of some kind) so you can layer up if the wind picks up or it begins to rain. A light waterproof jacket is ...


3

Many others have mentioned the clothing, especially the color. I am also of the long-sleeved fraction, but! I don't think that sports clothing is your best bet. It is made from synthetics, and they cause a bit of greenhouse effect and don't wick sweat that well, despite the manufacturers' promises. In the really high heat, it's best to wear linen. It has a ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible