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48

In the US, it really depends on where you are staying. In a big hotel in a city, it would be expected that you wear street clothes or even casual business wear in the public areas. Granted you could get away with wandering down the hall to get some ice or a soda from the vending machine in your pajamas, but lounging in the lobby or a reading room and ...


29

Well, about changing clothes in Kerala, to stay fresh and hygienic you will need to do it twice in a day to be frank. Once after taking bath, and once may be before going to bed. So there is no way you could not get stinky without changing clothes after every bath. Doing laundry by hand is not such a bad thing. Maybe this is the time when you can learn ...


28

What people usually do is putting on their boxers/underwear in the shower cubicle then come out and put on the rest. Some people do what Burhan described in the other answer as well.


26

Whilst Google has a few references on the topic (most of which date back a couple years ago), some of which do mention some sort of implicit association between white trousers and being gay, I think this belief is no more than a metropolitan legend. I lived in London for a long time, I have several gay friends, and I have never heard them mention this, as ...


23

You don't need a hat. If you're traveling for business and are in the IT industry, you'll spend all your time in air-conditioned offices, hotels and taxis, and will spend very little time outside. As a rule, only the poor walk in India, and the campuses of Indian IT firms are generally in suburbs that are virtually unreachable by public transport anyway. ...


22

In the olden days you did do laundry with bar soap - but it was laundry bar soap - harsher and unscented. You can still get it in Mexico and probably lots of places. I guess "hand soap" as it is (or was) usually called differs mainly by being more expensive and probably has ingredients to be less harsh on the skin, and it's usually scented. Whether any of ...


21

The most common rules (may vary of course): you have to remove your shoes. men: trousers, not shorts women: long skirt (or trousers) women: shoulder and arms cannot be exposed women: scarf (sometimes)


21

From Saint-Peter's Basilica site:


21

For the general area, there's no dress code - you even see people wandering through in their swimming gear after they've been in the pool! I've been in wearing tshirt and jeans, feeling underdressed until I saw the tourists in their tshirt and shorts with flip-flops. However, you may wish to consider what else you want to do in Vegas, and dress ...


21

Wrap a towel around your waist (or use a dressing gown/shower gown and face the locker) and then change your trunks/shorts.


20

Rick Steves has a post on this and his answer comes down to: Interpret hoteliers’ reticence as “I have lots of good furniture and fine floors in this room, and I don’t want your drippy laundry ruining things.” But as long as you wash carefully and are respectful of the room, go right ahead. It's also possible they want to save on water, but then ...


20

It varies, and flight attendants will often alter it over the course of longer flights as well (for example, on overnight flights they often turn up the temperature by a degree or two). Often there are drafts from the air conditioning, although it's hard to predict exactly where unless you often sit in the same seat on the same plane. The traditional and ...


19

Funnily enough, there's scientifically exact solution to this - it's known as the Knapsack problem and is considered to be NP-complete - it is expected that no algorithm can be both correct and fast (polynomial-time) on ALL cases. But naturally there are tips and suggestions to help guide you towards an optimal solution. Running shoes, it's good to ...


19

The only realistic answer to this question is that there is no answer. Standards of dress in the US are not standardized, except in certain contexts like prisons, the military, certain types of business, Catholic schools, and fancy restaurants. Circa 1960 was the last time in the US when there was some kind of general consensus on what was proper dress in ...


18

Vegas is a dry heat--while this is often scorned by those who don't understand the difference it means that your body can do a much better job of cooling itself than you might expect. Your body sweats, it very quickly evaporates and you are nowhere near as aware of the heat as you would think. As others have said, bring plenty to drink--although since you ...


18

Short answer: no. In North America, public spaces require public dress. You would not, for example, wear a swimsuit to the restaurant. Asia is a bit more relaxed - you can walk around a Japanese resort town in what amounts to a housecoat.


17

In most Muslim countries, keeping the arms and legs (and of course the cleavage) covered would be considered completely sufficient, especially for someone who is visibly a foreigner. Some (e.g. Turkey, at least the bigger cities) are much more tolerant and nobody will feel offended by bare arms or legs. The strictest dress code exists in Saudi Arabia, ...


16

It's all about layers and weight. As long as you can lose or add layers as you go, you'll be fine. So thermals/polyprops, then tshirts (lightweight, quickdry are the best), then a light jersey, followed by a jacket - ideally waterproof. Same for legs - polyprop, then some of those light trousers which tear off into shorts as well and are quick dry. ...


15

Clothing restrictions in mosques often vary from country-to-country, and even within mosques in a country. Everyone is asked to take their shoes off at an entrance area. For men, no shorts are allowed; for women, no skirts or bare shoulders, in addition to this some countries also mandate women to wear a scarf. Those are the basics, but how 'welcoming' a ...


15

There is for example this company that has a website where they list all the coin-laundries (コインランドリー). You will have to know how to read addresses in Japanese at least to use this. There are tons of others, also usually found in remote areas: coin-laundry.co.jp ciao-net.jp mocomoco-jp.com super-laundry.net (google for コインランドリー 店舗一覧 to find more) In ...


14

The problem with dirty clothes is they will take huge space when packing them again (if not done correctly), logically the clothes are the same but after packing the dirty ones the space is not enough. Usually this is due to packing them in an ugly way like the ways you mentioned (ball them or putting them in shoe bags). The best thing I have always been ...


14

As mentioned in other answers, the rules against shorts should be understood as rules against normal clothing, so you can't just jump in with the clothes you were wearing when outside the pool. But swim trunks are very common for recreational swimmers. An example of the dresscode of a random public pool in Belgium explains what I mean (these are the allowed ...


13

Roll, don't fold your clothes. It is much easier to make a tight roll than it is to make a tight fold. This doesn't mean not to use the "bundle wrap" method mentioned in other answers, but after you've done that, roll your boxers, remaining shirts, etc, and stuff them in the corners and nooks and crannies that remain.


13

You may want to look into buying clothing specifically marketed as keeping you cool. I regularly ride my bike 15 km in 30 C heat. In a white cotton tshirt, sweat runs down my arms and I have trouble gripping the handlebars. In a long sleeved "performance " shirt I feel much cooler (even in a dark blue one) and sweat far less. I also drink less water in those ...


13

Skirts specifically are not required, but modest dress certainly is, mostly in religious sites: churches like St. Peter's in the Vatican, major temples in Thailand and India, mosques pretty much anywhere if they're even open to visitors, etc. From the Vatican's official site: Access to Vatican Museums, Sistine Chapel, Vatican Gardens and Saint Peter's ...


12

Fleece tops are great because they're warm, dry fast, and can be squished down a lot in a backpack. If you take a fleece top and a lightweight, waterproof jacket, you'll be fine in terms of outerwear. I agree with Mark Mayo that quick-drying t-shirts and pants that tear/zipper off into shorts are perfect for cutting down on travel. However, you might want ...


12

If you come from a tropical country, the jacket your've linked to is surely not enough. I'm from Saint-Petersburg, and even I would add something to this jacket. I suggest you wear a long jacket to cover your back, something like this: FjällRäven is not very cheap, but it is lightweight and made with durable materials - I use this brand, and that is why ...


12

There is indeed some statute suggesting something like that, namely § 132a StGB (which means “paragraph 132a” in the penal code): (1) Wer unbefugt […] inländische oder ausländische Uniformen, Amtskleidungen oder Amtsabzeichen trägt, wird mit Freiheitsstrafe bis zu einem Jahr oder mit Geldstrafe bestraft. which could be translated as “A person ...


12

Here are some of the 'hacks' that I've used: It's winter, there's often a heater on, or heatpump, or fire. Try and hang the clothes near to (but not on) the heater. Turn them frequently - you don't want them getting too hot or burnt. Use air - moving air. Hang in a doorway for the internal flow, or if possible, outside during the day. Beware to take ...


12

I'm resident in Canada and occasionally travel to Dubai to visit my parents. I am in Dubai right now and it was 44 degrees Celsius this afternoon. Note that I am used to wearing shorts even when it is lower than 0 Celsius while in Canada. Here is what I have for you: Clothing Absolutely avoid long sleeved clothing Wear shorts instead of jeans or other ...



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