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19

For the general area, there's no dress code - you even see people wandering through in their swimming gear after they've been in the pool! I've been in wearing tshirt and jeans, feeling underdressed until I saw the tourists in their tshirt and shorts with flip-flops. However, you may wish to consider what else you want to do in Vegas, and dress ...


17

Funnily enough, there's scientifically exact solution to this - it's known as the Knapsack problem and is considered to be NP-complete - it is expected that no algorithm can be both correct and fast (polynomial-time) on ALL cases. But naturally there are tips and suggestions to help guide you towards an optimal solution. Running shoes, it's good to ...


16

It's all about layers and weight. As long as you can lose or add layers as you go, you'll be fine. So thermals/polyprops, then tshirts (lightweight, quickdry are the best), then a light jersey, followed by a jacket - ideally waterproof. Same for legs - polyprop, then some of those light trousers which tear off into shorts as well and are quick dry. ...


16

In the olden days you did do laundry with bar soap - but it was laundry bar soap - harsher and unscented. You can still get it in Mexico and probably lots of places. I guess "hand soap" as it is (or was) usually called differs mainly by being more expensive and probably has ingredients to be less harsh on the skin, and it's usually scented. Whether any of ...


15

In most Muslim countries, keeping the arms and legs (and of course the cleavage) covered would be considered completely sufficient, especially for someone who is visibly a foreigner. Some (e.g. Turkey, at least the bigger cities) are much more tolerant and nobody will feel offended by bare arms or legs. The strictest dress code exists in Saudi Arabia, ...


13

Roll, don't fold your clothes. It is much easier to make a tight roll than it is to make a tight fold. This doesn't mean not to use the "bundle wrap" method mentioned in other answers, but after you've done that, roll your boxers, remaining shirts, etc, and stuff them in the corners and nooks and crannies that remain.


13

There is for example this company that has a website where they list all the coin-laundries (コインランドリー). You will have to know how to read addresses in Japanese at least to use this. There are tons of others, also usually found in remote areas: coin-laundry.co.jp ciao-net.jp mocomoco-jp.com super-laundry.net (google for コインランドリー 店舗一覧 to find more) In ...


12

Clothing restrictions in mosques often vary from country-to-country, and even within mosques in a country. Everyone is asked to take their shoes off at an entrance area. For men, no shorts are allowed; for women, no skirts or bare shoulders, in addition to this some countries also mandate women to wear a scarf. Those are the basics, but how 'welcoming' a ...


12

Fleece tops are great because they're warm, dry fast, and can be squished down a lot in a backpack. If you take a fleece top and a lightweight, waterproof jacket, you'll be fine in terms of outerwear. I agree with Mark Mayo that quick-drying t-shirts and pants that tear/zipper off into shorts are perfect for cutting down on travel. However, you might want ...


12

Here are some of the 'hacks' that I've used: It's winter, there's often a heater on, or heatpump, or fire. Try and hang the clothes near to (but not on) the heater. Turn them frequently - you don't want them getting too hot or burnt. Use air - moving air. Hang in a doorway for the internal flow, or if possible, outside during the day. Beware to take ...


11

Gloves I currently reside in Sweden and the locals, especially up north, use two pairs of gloves. The most important point is that the big one-finger gloves (aka mitts) are very warm, but will prevent precise manipulations (such as taking pictures, finding something in your pocket, zipping and unzipping, etc.), while the five-fingered ones usually are ...


11

One quick and easy tip - if there are sights there, like, let's say - Machu Picchu in Peru, do a Google Image search for Machu Picchu tourists (if you don't say tourists you just get nice shots of a mountain), and see what the people in the photos are wearing. It gives you a good guide of what might be suitable. Even add in a month to your search - for ...


11

I wore my kilt (heavyweight one) round Germany and I can heartily recommend it - I made many friends, had lots of drinks bought for me and got invited to a lot of events and parties as people could spot the Scotsman a mile off. I'm assuming you are Scottish - if not, you may get some hassle, potentially, for pretending to be one :-) In the summer it can be ...


11

There is indeed some statute suggesting something like that, namely § 132a StGB (which means “paragraph 132a” in the penal code): (1) Wer unbefugt […] inländische oder ausländische Uniformen, Amtskleidungen oder Amtsabzeichen trägt, wird mit Freiheitsstrafe bis zu einem Jahr oder mit Geldstrafe bestraft. which could be translated as “A person ...


10

If you come from a tropical country, the jacket your've linked to is surely not enough. I'm from Saint-Petersburg, and even I would add something to this jacket. I suggest you wear a long jacket to cover your back, something like this: FjällRäven is not very cheap, but it is lightweight and made with durable materials - I use this brand, and that is why ...


10

Whenever I go to Europe I am struck by how differently the European men dress than North American ones. First and foremost, their feet. They almost never wear running shoes. Their shoes are small and fit close to the foot. They are never white, and if you see the same man on several different days he may very well wear a different pair of shoes each day, to ...


9

Typically there is very little amount of snow in Tbilisi which usually melts in a day or two in most parts of the city but it can also pile up and go icy (in 2008 we had snow for about three weeks). Wind and rain is more common. I'm not sure what you mean by 'special winter clothes' but a sweater and a coat should be enough most of the time. You will also ...


9

I'm Italian and I visited Rome as a tourist myself about one year ago. The image which mouviciel so usefully linked is self-explanatory, but it is not true for Rome or Vatican City only, all the churches in Italy have something similar being displayed IF they are regularly visited by tourists (otherwise, the same rule holds but there is no specific ...


9

TL;DR Use weatherspark to find the time-of-year that weather in your hometown corresponds to the weather at the time and place you'll be visiting. Compare Historical Data with a Place You Know It used to be a real pain to try to figure out how the weather was likely to be at a new-to-me destination at some future time. In the last few years, however, I ...


8

All of those places are touristy, and as such they're completely used to seeing tourists wearing all of the described clothing. One thing to note, however, is if you're taking the train down to Aswan/Luxor overnight, it can get rather chilly in the desert at which point you will most certainly want more than just t-shirts and shorts. In fact I had my ...


8

It's true you might not actually need hiking boots but you have to decide. Personally I didn't like the kind of backpackers that seemed to have all the expensive brand name gear whether they needed it or not. Felt a bit phoney to me when I was younger. So while others had $200 brand name hiking boots I had my cheap supermarket sneakers. I also felt the ...


8

That's the kind of gear I'd use when going to hike well into subzero temperatures. Attempting to hike in such a gear at +20°C, especially in humid air, you'll not be comfortable at all. It's a total overkill. Especially the pants. What I'd use for such a hike: t-shirt, preferably non-cotton stay-dry kind; soft shell fleece jacket (Windstopper or ...


8

Generally there is no strict dress code on the casino floors (within reason), so Jeans and T-Shirt would be just fine. There is a blog entry on the subject from Las Vegas Direct and also on TripAdvisor. There is also a somewhat decent FAQ regarding age restrictions. If you get into an exclusive area where stakes are rather large you might be required to ...


8

When I hiked through Japan in 1999 I mainly was guided by the Lonely Planet edition of that year. Every hotel/inn/B&B I stayed had modern (western style)- do it yourself - washing machines. I never experienced any problem. I don't know the situation when you get of the lonely planet track


8

For Kuala Lumpur you should dress however you are comfortable (okay, not naked, you need to have some level of modesty); you'll be okay walking around the city in a sleeveless t-shirt, shorts and flip-flops/thongs. You probably won't be dressed appropriately for some venues, but you're fine for standard tourist activities. This dress is a bit uncommon for ...


8

Layers. Bring several. The average temperatures you quote are very misleading. Two years ago I was there in July and, while I would concur with the average, temperatures varied between 4C and 20C. That means that I used a thin long-sleeve top and was slightly hot around noon and was quite cold with a jacket, sweater plus long-sleeve top at night. Light ...


7

Generally it would be said to you if you need to do some specific - rules are various from country to country and even from town to town. I can't remember something applied to all except that you really should not eat or sleep there, or something like that :) Dogs are banned too. Calm, peaceful and polite non-Muslim will not attract negative energy during ...


7

After many miles put on my old sneakers, I wear hiking boots whenever and wherever I travel now. There is nothing so miserable as getting a hole in the sole of your sneakers in a snow storm. Now, I always wear a pair of brown leather hiking boots that have some class when I travel, so I can wear them to dinner or on a hike. I have another set of boots that ...



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