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16

My parents live in the countryside (in the UK, not Colombia, admittedly), their tap water comes from a natural spring. They don't drink it. The problem is the water like this tends to be in the open have a lot of crap can get in there. Including literal crap, live and dead animals, chemicals from farms and other businesses, etc, etc. The closer you get to ...


13

The city is Fujiyoshida on the NNE side of Mt Fuji. See jpatokal's answer for the exact camera location. From left to right, the marked buildings are: Fujisan station. The glass facade that's visible from street level is quite poorly defined in this photo, but covers the bottom third of the blue frame. The lighter part that's visible in the photo sticks ...


11

I think this is the building: Google Maps street view link


6

The photo is taken from the grounds of Arakura Sengen Shrine in Fuji-Kawaguchiko, Yamanashi, Japan, and appears to be a crop of this image (not the original either, though). The rightmost building appears to be the town hall. Not sure about the rest, but there are a bunch of large hotels and the Fuji-Q amusement park nearby that seem like likely ...


4

You could try https://nomadlist.com/ which compares; The best places to live and work remotely for digital nomads, based on cost of living, internet speed, weather and other metrics. For startups that work remotely and digital nomads. Initially built for, and by, nomads (professionals who can work remotely it can show cost of living for locals, expats ...


4

The bottommost building is labeled as 富士五湖文化センター (Fujigoko Cultural Center) on Google Maps. However, the official website of that cultural center http://www.mfi.or.jp/fcpa/access.htm tells us that the biggest building (which is probably the one you are interested in) is called ふじさんホール (Fujisan Hall). The same complex also hosts a city meeting hall and a ...


3

This probably won't apply to Europe, but I live next to this awesome lake, and a friend of mine actually own a water bottling company! Above is the Kandy lake, which is located right next to a few mountains. We don't even touch this water. However, I still think it's somewhat safe to assume that you can drink water that is right next to a mountain. ...


3

The advice that water in cities is more likely to be drinkable is based on that larger urban water systems tend to have some degree of water treatment (i.e., chlorination, ozone, or UV-based) that will kill bacteria, viruses, parasites, and spores. However, the water source itself may be of questionable quality from the perspective of other pollutants (heavy ...


2

There cannot be a correct way to determine the relative cost of living, simply because each person has a different "basket" of needs. If you like it cool and damp, your HVAC costs are going to be a lot higher in Scottsdale than Seattle; if you like it hot and dry, it will be the other way around. But you did not ask for the correct way; you asked for a ...


2

Here in Colorado just about all the rivers, even little creeks, have giardia spores in them. Giardia is really a tough thing to kill. Just boiling the water won't do it. There are some very tiny filters that can, but you have to be very gentle with them or the filter breaks. The DEA has halted sales of iodine, which could purify water, because iodine can be ...


1

I don't know for sure if they own the building, but the image appears on http://www.cassandra-fp7.eu/page/Workshop_home (on the first section of their slideshow), this could though be beacuse it is a stock image.


1

Just to confirm that what they say above about high crime rates is not true. I've been living for more than 20 years in several cities of that area and i could say that you could feel safe walking in the streets almost at any time of day and night. Of course that there exist places where is better not to go.



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