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26

Requiring an extra visa or exit permit from citizens is not very common today but historically, that's why passports were invented (and not to restrict immigration) and the reason for that is simple: a large population was seen as the bedrock of power. You need many young people (and especially men) for labor-intensive industries and for the army. In many ...


15

Here is a really interesting site that attempts to explain all the problems that Chinese citizens suffer in order to travel abroad: http://www.why-so-hard-chinese-travel-abroad.com/ Much of it seems to be down to difficulty and cost of acquiring a passport and visas. Passport acquisition: Requires multiple visits to home province irrespective of where the ...


10

As a Chinese national, you can stay within Helsinki airport up to 24 hours whilst in transit without a visa - however you will need to remain in the international "air-side" area. There are two hotels in the airport (GLO and Hilton), however both are outside of security so you will not be able to access them without a visa. There are also a number of other ...


10

Your question appears to be answered by FAQs 13 and 15: I am resident in one of the countries covered by the Programme but a national of another country. Can I avail of the Programme? Only passport holders of those countries are included in the scheme. Residents in those countries, who are not nationals of that country, are not covered. ...


9

Hopefully this wont provoke any politically charged responses, but I believe it (at least to some minor extent) has to do with keeping Chinese people in China. It's very well known that the living conditions in some parts of China, and in some professions (think factory workers) are very bad compared to most of the western world. If you look at ...


8

What you have is a common format residence permit. It looks very much like a Dutch national ID card (same format and general appearance, but the colours are different) and is actually a valid ID for many purposes within the Netherlands. It even says "Identiteitsbewijs" on the card itself, which is arguably a little confusing. What EU law calls a "national ...


7

It turns out the information is indeed on the Azerbaijan Ministry of Foreign Affairs website, just the link does not stand out well and the page contains at least one other broken link. The countries applying the visa-free regime page has a section II group. For the holders of any kind of passports (Diplomatic, service, (official/special) and ...


7

Well this is a shocker for me but it seems like Australia got around to implementing this much more quickly than I would've expected. An article I just found on an expat forum states that China was added to the list exactly one week ago: Australia has added China to the list of countries whose citizens are eligible for Work and Holiday Visas. ...


6

Karlson's anwer is correct in that if you stay 'airside' you do not need a visa. I would however like to point out that since Copenhagen's airport mostly services flights within Schengen, most of the airside area is going to be inaccessible to you. In fact, only a very small part of the airport will be accessible to you without clearing passport control. ...


6

My reading of that -- and I'm obviously not a Chinese immigration bureaucrat -- is that she's probably OK without the visa, as long as you can make the trip out to be Malaysia->China->Malaysia via Hong Kong on both legs. From Malaysia to Hong Kong, as long as she claims to be going to Shenzhen or wherever, she is "in transit through Hong Kong" and "will go ...


6

Let's get something straight from the beginning... This is a horrible refusal notice. I'm actually embarrassed just looking at it. The formulae is bizarre and doesn't show up anywhere in the operations manual. This immediately raises the question of authenticity. User 'Relaxed' (to whom thanks) asks if a third-party handled the application (like a ...


5

The short answer is 'no', there are some provisions in UK law that cover emergency cases but attending a funeral is not covered. There are no short cuts. Even if the Chinese Ministry of Foreign Affairs asks them to facilitate an application, it still goes through the whole rigmarole. For reference purposes, your case is governed by Paragraph 41 of the ...


5

You'll have to apply for a visa - it can be done online if certain requirements are met. Otherwise, you may have to visit the embassy or one of the consulates of Sweden in the USA. They should also be able to answer questions authoritatively.


5

So I've got bad news and good more bad news. The bad news is that, as Doc explains, you need to get a visa or you'll be stuck in the international section of the airport, which is quite small: (~8 gates, duty-free shop, cafe and that's pretty much it -- but at least the wifi is free. Also, since Finland is a member of the Schengen area, there's no concept ...


5

Information from the page of Russian Consulate in Sydney Dear non-Australian visitors! Please be advised that all non-Australian applicants may apply for visa to the Consulate General of Russia in Sydney only upon presentation of proof of residence in Australia or work/study permit issued by Australian authorities valid for at least 90 days. One of the ...


5

There is nothing that says you have to have a transit visa if you don't leave airside, however, if you do you will need another full fledged Schengen short term visa as Chinese nationals are required to. You can also review the list of all agreements regarding visa issuance by Denmark. And if this is not enough you can visit the VFS Global site for China ...


5

Sri Lanka does not know or care that you have multiple nationalities, so using your UK passport will be fine. Immigration can ask pretty much anything they want to, but I can't recall ever having to show my boarding pass on arrival. If they did, and they noticed the name is different, there is nothing wrong with showing your Chinese passport as well. That ...


5

You can't get a visa per se, since Taiwan, ROC and China are considered by both governments to be the same country, but you may be able to get an entry permit (which, of course, is a defacto visa). The requirements are listed in detail at this website. In part, badly google translated below (for 'job applicant' = employed applicants- students, unemployed and ...


4

Unfortunately, there is no way to definitively answer this question. Visa outcomes depend from embassy-to-embassy and case-to-case. From what you are describing, it appears the mistake was made by the German embassy rather than by you - although you should have taken the prerogative to check a visa of the correct length had been issued, but there's not much ...


4

Earlier today, UKVI issued an announcement which is reproduced here in its entirety... I am writing to update you on further improvements to the UK's visa service in China. Today the UK and Belgian governments have announced a new pilot scheme that will streamline the visa application processes for Chinese nationals wanting to visit the UK, ...


4

Yes indeed there is a simple way for Chinese nationals to get a UK visa at the same time they get a Schengen. This question/answer pair reveals the details Obtaining a UK and Schengen Visa in a Single Application or Single Step in China Upon reading the article, you will find that the procedure extracts fields from a UK application and puts the information ...


4

A great resource for this can be found at Visa requirements for Chinese citizens (Wikipedia has a page like this for every country). On this page, you can see that although Chinese citizens do not need a visa for Azerbaijan to visit up to 30 days, a visa is required for all the other countries on your proposed itinerary. Similarly, you can find additional ...


4

Based upon what you wrote, the big mistake was getting in touch with UKVI. That should have set off alarm bells and red flags. For your question about how to understand what the ECO wrote, you asked for something that they are not allowed to issue, hence '...not satisfied that you qualify...' It's the literal meaning of the words and nothing more. You did ...


4

Strange choice of transit but not mine. There is no visa required for transit as long as don't leave the terminal. All international departures happen in terminal D and the visa information from Timatic is as follows: China - Destination Passport Passport required. Document validity rules: Passports and other documents accepted for entry ...


4

Nice observation! This is a 'known problem' within UKVI that the online form did not sync up after the rule change last April. Regardless of what you enter, your application will be considered against Appendix V of the rules and if you are successful, you will receive a 'standard visitor visa' (or to be exact, 'entry clearance'). Based upon what you wrote,...


4

Yes, she can. (Friends on an H-1B got single entry Canadian visa.) She will have to show proof of status in the US. You have to create an account here, upload all the required documents (tax returns, proof of status, itinerary, etc), pay a fee and wait for a decision. After decision is reached, she will be able to mail in her passport. Take into account ...


3

When I applied for my 1st Chinese visa, I was like you a Canadian citizen residing in the US (Seattle area). I used a company to facilitate the process and to do it by mail ( http://mychinavisa.com/ ) and everything went smoothly (and the application was actually processed at the San Francisco consulate - that's what it says on my visa). There was never any ...


3

How much stuff do you have? You will not be able to move personal effects (term customs uses for your stuff) between countries without a residence visa. If you show up at the Peace Bridge border crossing with a rented truck they will deny you entry as it looks like you are moving down there (which you are). Note that the rented truck is no problem at all, ...


3

Not really. For example, Uzbekistan has a 2x72hr transit visa, but that really doesn't give you time to do much at all. You need to get a tourist visa, and a Letter of Invitation. It's probably the hardest one to get (although Kazakhstan took me a long time when I was in St Petersburg). The 'best' resource online for this at present is probably ...


3

The existing answers treat China as if the situation there is very fundamentally different from other countries (like the US). However, residents from both countries have areas that they need a visa for, and areas that don't need a visa/permit at all. Sure, the no-visa country list is shorter for China than the US, but the chinese list will likely keep ...



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