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I wouldn't worry about it. There are two basic kinds of traditional Chinese teapots: clay and metal. Clay teapots may indeed well use lead in the glazing, but the glazing is always on the outside of the pot, and will not thus come into contact with the tea. But if this isn't enough for you, just buy a simple, unglazed teapot. Metal teapots, at least the ...


2

I can tell you out of my own experience that I (as a caucasian tourist) was not allowed to board a flight in Hotan (Xinjiang province) heading to Urumuqi because I had decorative knives in my checked-in luggage. They were about 13cm long with the grip and very nicely decorated. I did not have any in my carry on. On check-in they X-Rayed the luggage and ...


7

I cannot tell you the exact official position (or the N official positions as the case may be) but I can give you some useful personal anecdotal input. Short: You are extremely unlikely to have any problems at all if you are otherwise sensibly behaved. If you did happen to incur the wrath of the authorities I would not be overly surprised if a statute ...


2

Yes, you can. Nobody is going to check whether you work in China or not. Changing Educational Institution or Employer If you want to study at a different educational institution or work for another employer, it is permitted to do this without having to start from the absolute beginning and get a new visa. The first criterion is that you must ...


2

I haven't traveled to China, but I have traveled extensively through Thailand, India, Indonesia, Pakistan and Nepal. In my experience, the locals really appreciate small American-made things like chocolates and candy. A bag of Hershey's kisses made me the favorite person among all the kids when I was visiting a friend in India. Key here is to buy something ...


6

The holy trinity of Chinese gifting is liquor, cigarettes and local delicacies. In the $15-20 bracket you're presumably not looking to bribe anybody, so a nice bottle of California wine might fit the bill, although they're fragile and a pain to transport due to liquid restrictions. For local delicacies, things like chocolate or candy are pretty safe, and ...


4

Fret not, travel.stackexchange.com works just fine :D For other services, however, currently there are over 2700 sites blocked in Mainland China. Wikipedia maintains a list of popular sites or services blocked in mainland China. Pretty much all Google services, Yahoo, Dropbox, Facebook, Twitter, Youtube and more - see the list for details. I can confirm ...



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