Hot answers tagged

45

This may be due to the long Time To First Fix. Indeed, I recently learned that recent smartphones use mechanisms called "Assisted GPS" in order to get a location based on GPS reception. The idea is that if you use your GPS in an area you haven't been before, the GPS would take some time to find and interpret the signal, mostly because of the slow download ...


38

IKeelYou's answer is excellent for the general case, but I'd like to add some specifics, since you mention this is in China. This guy was trying to sell you transportation service. This is a very popular way for people with cars to make money, because just getting tags (i.e. current stickers, registration, license plates, etc.) is both expensive and ...


38

This is very common in many airports around the world, someone who is trying to make a living by driving people form the airport and offering their services. Usually they are tourist traps and they will try to take as much as they could from you, unless you know how to deal with them. Their services vary, they can be taxi drivers, they do offer ...


31

Vince covers the likely explanation, but unfortunately there are several more sinister possibilities as well. Long story short, China's legislation on GPS is both really vague and in part secret: by some readings of the law all use of GPS devices is technically prohibited, and not a few cameras and other GPS-enabled devices go so far as to disable GPS ...


23

Finding suitable souvenirs for office distribution (会社用バラマキお土産) is a problem of every Japanese traveller, but this article in Japanese has lots of tried and tested ideas for Beijing. To quickly summarize: China-only variants of Japanese candy, like banana milk or wine & chocolate Pocky. Even Chinese packaging of "normal" Japanese candy is unusual and ...


17

I've been to China with a UAE stamp in the same passport. No problem was raised. I don't particularly see why there would be a problem? China and the UAE have pretty good relations. So in answer to your question - yes, it IS possible to travel to China with a UAE stamp in your passport.


9

Since you're not using an agency, you'll need a credit card with a big enough limit. In order to get the confirmation in order, they will need to get the charge approved and posted to your account. When you cancel, you'll get a credit from them. Time it so that the debit and credit fall within the same billing cycle to avoid having to make a payment or ...


9

It's because China manages its air traffic by routing flights along relatively narrow air corridors. For a discussion, see https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/explained-flight-delays-china-todd-siena.


8

Many good answers here already. But I have been to China before, and used GPS with a very good precision, and with Google Maps. Also, dealing with the coordinates and mobile device GPS is part of my profession, so let me pitch in. GPS satellites are nothing more than a satellite network that spreads a signal of a timestamp that mobile phones or any GPS ...


8

Here is the official visa page for the Chinese embassy in Saigon. You can download a Word doc with English instructions; for the same information in HTML form visit the Chinese consulate in Vietnam's official site, last updated 2008. Here is the English version of visa application form (PDF, direct link). In addition to the obvious forms, photos, money and ...


8

Even if flexible return tickets are more expensive, it could be cheaper than two One-Way tickets, due to the way how airlines calculate their OW fares. You could also try to get a good fare which is not completely restricted (e.g. changing the date for a fee like 100$), which could still be cheaper than flexible ones, even if you add the fee.


8

The area next to Hong Kong-China Boundary in Hong Kong is Frontier Closed Area. Only permitted people can access it. If you want to cross the boundary, the cheapest way is Huangbus (皇巴士) from Huanggang Port to San Tin Public Transport Interchange. It costs $9 HKD, paid by cash or Octopus card. Dont expect to hitchhike in GuangDong. Each year many drivers ...


8

No, you can not do this, at least on most trains and as long as you want to do everything officially. You will need to go to a ticket office and buy an additional ticket for the needed segment. There are many reasons for this, but one is very simple: the conductor simply has no means to find out whether there are any tickets left on the second segment, or ...


7

PS: I am a Hongkonger which often goes to Mainland China and I am living with two friends which are Chinese and Hongkongers who often live in Mainland China First of all, plan on no access to Google services, not just Google search but also Gmail, and other service, even for Google Play store. Other western social media like Facebook and Twitter are not ...


7

Well this is a shocker for me but it seems like Australia got around to implementing this much more quickly than I would've expected. An article I just found on an expat forum states that China was added to the list exactly one week ago: Australia has added China to the list of countries whose citizens are eligible for Work and Holiday Visas. ...


6

I'm a Chinese student who just came back to China from US a month ago. As most VPN protocols have their own characteristics, GFW is able to detect VPN connections and reset/block VPN connections. Although VPNs can be blocked, if you use your own server and don't have a very heavy traffic, you might still be able to use it. One of the most popular methods ...


6

Because this question appears as one of the first suggestions on Google, I thought I would give an updated answer as of October 2015. You cannot access any Google services in China without a VPN or a proxy service. The only site that works is www.google.cn which I do not think many foreigners would want to use considering even the domain itself is not ...


6

Long ago I took a fairly simple GPS (coordinates only, this was before the idea of a GPS with a map existed) to China--and found it couldn't cope with all the tall buildings. In a large park it would work. Once I managed to get a fix with it sitting on a windowsill high up in a building but at street level with buildings around I never got enough ...


6

Current information for Chinese visa application process in Ho Chi Minh City (Saigon), Vietnam as of 8 April, 2015 First the bad news. They only issue single-entry thirty-day tourist visas in HCMC, and I get the impression this will be the case also in Hanoi. (There may be a chance Vietnamese or US citizens can get other types of visas here, since those ...


6

When you land at 3:00 AM, you should probably take taxi. It'll cost you around $55. (I've checked the rates over a site that i own, so i'm not sure if i should share the URL. Because i don't want to get marked as SPAM) When you land at 11:00 AM, you should probably take the bus and following are the choices taken from ...


6

Speaking from experience (2 double-entry visas for me, and a few multi-entry visas for someone else), there's definitely both an entry and an exit stamp for each entry. Of course, there can always be exceptions - I don't think passport stamps are ever 100% reliable - some border agents may not know all the rules, etc. Some border crossings can be really ...


6

A bit of advice to choose and use a good VPN in China: Don't pick the most famous VPN services, since they get blocked more often Choose one that offers different protocols to switch between. Register to the VPN before going to China. If it is free, the bandwidth probably won't be very good and might be unstable. So yes, it is worth paying for it. ...


6

I crossed back in 2012 using the Shenzhen metro (I believe it was to Lo Wu/Luohu), then walking across the checkpoint, then taking the MTR train to downtown Hong Kong, just as user Gagravarr mentions in comments. It was super-fast, easy and cheap, no Chinese language knowledge required. I do recommend getting a 1st-class MTR ticket though - it's slightly ...


5

Here's a community wiki to add to if there are more than these two: Embassy in Hanoi, as expected: 46 Hoang Dieu Rd, ☎ +84 4 3845-3736. Consulate in Ho Chi Minh, as expected: 175 Hai Bà Trưng, District 1, ☎ +84 8 3829-2463, fax: +84 8 3827-5845 These first two answers are from Wikivoyage. I went through each page for each city in Vietnam and did not ...


5

This is unsubstantiated. I worked in the UK for several years (IT worker) and met a few people who had worked in China (teaching English, among other things) and they had zero issues getting visas. It's one of those cases where you hear stories about visas (you hear a LOT from expats, it's just one of those things) and the rule is - until you see it written ...


5

Two days ago I took the Weidong ferry from Qingdao to Incheon, while both the Lonely Planet book and the ferry company web site state 775 CNY as the cheapest fare (economy bed) plus 30 CNY port tax = 805 CNY, the actual ticket was just 458 + 30 = 488 CNY Both China and South Korea have National holidays soon, so I don't think this was an off-season price. ...


5

Your question is how to find one, and not to make a direct referral of a translator/guide. I have assumed that you want a trustworthy and reasonably high quality daily escort. Mark Mayo added 'credible and/or official sources to the question. To research an answer I sent out five emails (I made it clear that I intended to pay the fair market rate for that ...


5

I am sure such question can not be answered with any reasonable detailed place. first of all if such place would be known to a broad audience, most probably it would be known to law enforcement and would be closed (like asking on the forum for a suggestion where to find gold in Alaska. It is useless because if people knew where to find it, all of it would ...


5

Generally speaking, you will need to have proof of onward travel within the time limit set by your visa to enter China. Airlines are preferred, though I personally have never had issues at the overland Hong Kong crossings without proof of onward travel. But on the flip side, I know people who have, and where you enter the country makes a difference in this ...


5

Looking at my passport, I can assure you that the standard is to stamp on each entry and on each exit - on the first empty page of the passport, not (necessarily) on the opposite page of the visa. Since multiple entry visa can last a year, and you might travel to other countries between your first and last visit on the visa, there might be other stamps and ...



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